CFP: Connecting Collections as Data: Transforming Communities, Sharing Knowledge, and Building Networks with International GLAM Labs

DUE JANUARY 31, 2020

Submissions and instructions are available via this google form: https://forms.gle/cis5C9BzSE6ZiXfC8

The Library of Congress Labs will host ‘Connecting Collections as Data: Transforming Communities, Sharing Knowledge, and Building Networks with International GLAM Labs,’ May 4-6, 2020 in Washington, DC. This event builds on conversations the British Library and the Royal Library of Denmark hosted around the hopes, dreams, and practicalities of fostering digital innovation in traditional heritage organizations with limited resources. The discussion and output from these meetings, which included state and university libraries across European and Gulf regions resulted in a BookSprint project and the open access publication, “Open a GLAM Lab”. The buzz from these events created a community (https://glamlabs.io) of “labbers” and the lab-interested which has grown to 250 participants from 20 countries.

The Library of Congress Labs team will host this emerging community in the United States for the first time to connect with the active and robust digital library, digital scholarship, digital humanities, and collections as data communities active across North America to share knowledge and expand the network. The meeting will be an opportunity for participants to advance an international community of practice and to exchange strategies and methods for advancing the development of innovative services for cultural heritage audiences.

Brief proposals are sought from individuals and groups who are interested in contributing to the program. Submission will be accepted until January 31, 2010 for:
1) 10 minute lighting talks (that may be grouped into themes), or
2) panel proposals that address a single theme with 3 to 4 speakers and a facilitator, or
3) full or half day workshops, datathons, or other hands-on working session.

Submit proposals via the form linked above.

There will be no registration fee for attending the event. Pre-registration via the Library of Congress Eventbrite system will be required, a link will be shared when registration opens in February 2020. A limited amount of honorariums may be available for speakers who need financial support to participate in the event. Due to regulations, honorariums are paid after the event, and support is not guaranteed for all speakers.

Draft Schedule
May 4: Digital Transformation Workshop – facilitated with the Liberating Structures method (maximum 75 people)
May 5: Connecting Collections as Data Conference (maximum 150 people)
—–Five themed sessions consisting of three or four lighting talks followed by a panel discussion (60 mins/panel)—-
May 6: Datathons or other hands on work sessions in breakout rooms (maximum 100 people total)

Note: Morning coffee will be provided but lunch will be on your own. There is a cafeteria adjacent to the meeting room and numerous restaurants in the neighborhood.

Questions about the proposal process or the event can be sent to LC-Labs@loc.gov .

Proposed themes for presentations, panels or workshops:

– User focused digital/data/innovation/lab tools, services and experiences, online and in physical space
– Supporting digital scholarship partnerships, digital and data reference services in a local and international context
– Supporting diverse users and including users in designing digital/data/innovation/lab programs
– Artificial intelligence and GLAMs, including community guidelines, operationalizing workflows, and practices around sharing data
– Expanding user engagement with crowdsourcing volunteers, leveraging expert crowdworkers, and combining crowd/human and machine learning workflows
– Collections as data, collection-readiness, preparing and using data sets
– Digital scholarship project lifecycle in context with community needs around access to tools/technology
– Balancing technical debt, open access, scholarly publishing, and open source software
– Digital transformation and organizational culture
– OR, propose your own theme

The Library of Congress Labs has hosted a Collections as Data themed event, in different formats, since 2016.

Agendas and livestreams from other events in the Collections as Data series are accessible via https://labs.loc.gov/events, summaries are below.

EYEO Code + Libraries Summit (June 3, 2019) was a day-long open summit co-hosted with EYEO Design Festival to explore ways that libraries and the creative coding community can work together to create new forms of collaboration, to empower learners and to strengthen communities in a un-conference format.

Inside Baseball Labs Showcase (July 13, 2018) capped off a week-long user-centered flash build facilitated by JSTOR Labs and in collaboration with the National Museum of African American History and Culture that produced prototype tools, presentations about the process, and a discussion about the history of baseball in the American cultural memory.

Collections as Data: Impact (July 25, 2017)
More relevant, more accessible, more visual, and more useful–these are some benefits of making digital collections available as data and ready for computational analysis. The Library of Congress hosted a day-long event that featured case-studies and impact stories of applying digital methods to analyzing and sharing collections. Presenters shared how using collections as data reactivates the holdings of libraries and other centers of history and art to make deeper connections to the communities they serve.

Collections as Data: Stewardship and Use Models to Enhance Access (Sept 27, 2016)
The rise of accessible digital collections coupled with the development of tools for processing and analyzing data has enabled researchers to create new models of scholarship and inquiry. The National Digital Initiatives team invited leaders and experts from organizations that are collecting, preserving and providing researcher access to digital collections as data to share best practices and lessons learned. This event will also highlight new collaborative initiatives at the Library of Congress that seek to enhance researcher engagement and the use of digital collections as data.

CFP: Archival Issues

Archival Issues is currently seeking submissions for its next issue.

Archival Issues is published twice each year and has an international readership. The journal is one of the premier outlets for archival literature, and its scope extends well beyond the Midwest. The Editorial Board of the Midwest Archives Conference strives to publish articles that will interest and educate a broad range of information professionals. Acceptable topics for articles cover the full range of archival activity. The journal also publishes reviews of current books on archival theory and practice.

Although Archival Issues publishes contributions from well-established professionals, the Editorial Board particularly encourages submissions from archivists who have not published previously. Editorial Board reviews of articles are conducted in a blind review process, and authors are usually informed of publication decisions within six weeks.

Archival Issues accepts submissions throughout the year. To be considered for issue 40.2, please submit your manuscript by February 1, 2020 to Editorial Board Chair Brandon T. Pieczko at bpieczko@gmail.com.

More info is available at: https://www.midwestarchives.org/archival-issues

New Issue: RBM

Vol 20, No 2 (2019), Fall
Table of Contents

Editor’s Note
Richard Saunders

Research Articles
Teaching Creative Writing in Special Collections
Alison Fraser

The Positive Side of Eliciting Negative Emotions: Survey Results of Visitor Responses to a Library Exhibit
Meg Frost, Caitlyn Towne-Anderson, Kendal Ferguson

An Independent Study Course by an Academic Library Department: Teaching with the Gems of Special Collections
Judy L. Silva, Barbara McIntosh

Book Reviews
Trevor Owens. The Theory and Craft of Digital Preservation.
Dan Noonan

Gerald Vizenor. Native Provenance: The Betrayal of Cultural Creativity.
Ricardo L. Punzalan

CFP: 2020 National Humanities Conference

CALL FOR PROPOSALS
2020 National Humanities Conference
Indianapolis, Indiana
Thursday, November 5, 2020 – Sunday, November 8, 2020

Deadline for submitting proposals: February 21, 2020

The Federation of State Humanities Councils and the National Humanities Alliance are excited to announce the 2020 National Humanities Conference, which will be held in Indianapolis. This annual conference brings together representatives from colleges, universities, state humanities councils, cultural institutions, and other community-based organizations to explore approaches to deepening the public’s engagement with the humanities.

Indianapolis is nicknamed the “Crossroads of America” because of its historic location along the old National Road and current site where four major interstates intersect. The conference convenes days after a presidential election, which like all national elections, is a crossroads, offering the opportunity to reflect on how we have arrived at this point and where we are heading. In this spirit, we invite proposals that explore the generative, exciting possibilities of public humanities work that happens at the crossroads.

Crossroads as decision points. When and how can the humanities and humanities practitioners help communities wrestle with tough choices? What difficult decisions face our own institutions—and how do we decide which way to go? Where have we taken risks, even if we failed—and what did we learn? When we’ve found our organizations at a difficult crossroads, how did we navigate rocky terrain and what happened as a result of our choices?

Crossroads as freedom. There’s a rich tradition of expression that associates crossroads with freedom—a place where multiple opportunities open up in front of you.  How can the humanities help communities discuss, even reimagine the meaning of freedom for all? In an increasingly partisan landscape, where should the humanities and humanities practitioners enter such conversations that may have unequal power dynamics?

Crossroads as uncertainty. In many cultures around the world, the crossroads is a liminal, uncertain space that is outside of normal time and space. A place that is neither here nor there, the crossroads and its uncertainty can be part of a process of becoming something new. Are there times in our own practice where we experience uncertainty and disorientation? Are there times when our programs create uncertainty and disorientation among their participants? What, if anything, is generative about doing humanities work where uncertainty is foregrounded?

Crossroads as intersections. When we reframe the crossroads as an intersection, some connotations fall away and others emerge. Interesting, good, complex work happens at the intersection of ideas, disciplines or methods. Are there outstanding models of interdisciplinary public humanities projects we can learn from? Where have unusual partnerships yielded new, urgent, meaningful public humanities work? We’re particularly interested in sessions that help us learn about public humanities initiatives or programs that address the following intersections: STEM/humanities, race/class/gender, arts/humanities, urban/rural, public/private.

We hope these questions are broad enough to spark session proposals that reflect the full range of work humanities organizations, practitioners, and scholars do: create and deliver public programs, form community partnerships, educate students, communicate with and convene publics, advocate for funding, cultivate donors, make grants, and build audiences.

In the spirit of the crossroads—places of coming together and exchange—we especially encourage session proposals that bring together humanities practitioners (state humanities council staff, museum workers, podcast producers, community historians, etc.) and scholars/academics. See examples from the 2019 conference here.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING PROPOSALS: February 21st, 2020

Formats

We invite proposals that model best practices in the public humanities. In other words, session leaders design lively, even fun ways of presenting information and participants are engaged as co-creators of knowledge. To that end, we encourage:

  • Sessions that model public humanities program design: dynamic, inclusive, and, where possible, participatory or hands-on.
  • Presentations that are concise and employ accessible language. We encourage moderators to ensure that presentations conform to predetermined limits: at least half of each session should involve audience participation.
  • Actionable takeaways that others can apply to their own practice or organization.
  • Sessions built around a problem, tension, or challenge in our work, with time for reflection and solutions-oriented discussion.

Indiana Humanities, the host council, is committed to creating an indelible experience that makes the most of our host city. If you have ideas or questions about opportunities to take your session off site or to identify local practitioners in order to strengthen your proposal and deepen learning and exchange, please contact Leah Nahmias, director of programs at Indiana Humanities (317-616-9804 / lnahmias@indianahumanities.org). Please note in your proposal if you need more than the standard 75-minute block of time for your session.

Session Proposals

EXPERIENTIAL HUMANITIES PROGRAM: These sessions engage conference attendees in actual humanities programming, modeled on successful programs carried out throughout the year. Sessions that draw on the city or the surrounding area and/or convey a sense of place are especially encouraged. Examples from the 2019 program can be found here.

FACILITATED DISCUSSION: One or two facilitators drive a conversation on a topic with a group of conference attendees. Conversations can broach themes of common interest, common challenges or points of tension within the humanities community. Topics for facilitated discussion should appeal to a wide range of conference participants in order to bring diverse voices into the conversation.

INTERVIEW: These sessions feature free-form dialogue between a humanities professional and an interviewer.

WORKSHOP: A hands-on session that teaches a particular skill set associated with program development, communications, collaboration, assessment, development/fundraising, cultivating new audiences or any other aspect of humanities programming.

ROUNDTABLE: Roundtables consist of a group of experts discussing a topic in front of an audience, rather than each presenting discrete remarks. A moderator leads the discussion and poses questions, but all participants speak equally about the topics. These sessions are limited to four discussants and one moderator.

PANEL: This traditional format includes a moderator and no more than three presenters. Presentations are timed so that at least half the session consists of moderator questions and discussion with the audience.

WORKING GROUPS: Working groups are seminar-like conversations of at least eight people that explore, in-depth, a subject of shared interest. Working groups will be accepted even if they do not have eight participants, but additional participants will need to be recruited after the session is accepted. The working group convenes for a session at the conference, but also converses before the conference and develops a product after. Each working group will have a facilitator, responsible for organizing the pre- and post-conference exchanges and facilitating the conversation at the conference itself. Working groups can open up for audience observers or confine participation to the members of the working group.

Individual Proposals

We invite proposals for individual flash presentations (5 minutes) that relate to one of the key crossroads themes outlined above: 1) decision point 2) freedom 3) uncertainty 4) intersection. The program committee will curate lightning round sessions of similarly themed presentations.

To submit a proposal:

Please submit session proposals via the online form here. Please submit proposals for individual flash presentations via the online form here. The deadline for proposal submission is Friday, February 21st, 2019.  For questions regarding the online submission form, please contact events@statehumanities.org.

The Federation of State Humanities Councils

The Federation of State Humanities Councils, founded in 1977, is the membership association of 56 state and territorial councils. Through its conferences, collaborative projects, information services, and communications to members, legislators and others on issues of public interest, the Federation supports the state humanities councils and creates greater awareness of the humanities in public and private life.

State humanities councils are independent, nonprofit organizations that support grassroots humanities programs and community-based activities in each state and US territory. Created by Congress in the early 1970s, councils receive an annual Congressional appropriation through the National Endowment for the Humanities, which for most councils is supplemented by state and private funding. Councils are run by small staffs and governed by volunteer boards drawn from academia and the public.

The National Humanities Alliance

The National Humanities Alliance (NHA) is a nationwide coalition of organizations advocating for the humanities on campuses, in communities, and on Capitol Hill. Founded in 1981, NHA is supported by over 200 member organizations, including: colleges, universities, libraries, museums, cultural organizations, state humanities councils, and scholarly, professional, and higher education associations. It is the only organization that brings together the US humanities community as a whole.

Call for Applicants: Associate Editor, Case Studies on Teaching with Primary Sources

Call for Applicants

The Teaching with Primary Sources sub-committee of the Reference, Access and Outreach Section of the Society of American Archivists is accepting applications for the role of Associate Editor for the Case Studies on Teaching With Primary Sources series. For more information about the series, visit https://www2.archivists.org/publications/epubs/Case-Studies-Teaching-With-Primary-Sources.

The Associate Editor works with the Editor to maintain the Teaching with Primary Sources Case Studies as a contribution to the professional scholarship and illustration of the application of the Guidelines for Primary Source Literacy. The position, in collaboration with the Editor, coordinates the review process and works with peer reviewers. The Associate Editor role shall become the Editor when their term expires, requiring a two-year commitment.

DUTIES

  • In consultation with the Editor, identify potential authors and solicit proposals
  • Assist in coordinating the peer review process, working with peer reviewers to provide timely feedback
  • As directed by the Editor, communicate reviews and feedback to authors
  • Promote recently published case studies to the RAO membership and broader community of practitioners

Applications will be accepted at twps-casestudies@archivists.org until February 1, 2020. Applicants should submit a statement of interest explaining their experience editing; a writing sample; and a resume/CV. Questions may be addressed to Jen Hoyer at twps-casestudies@archivists.org.

Book Recommendation: How to Write a Lot

Paul Silvia, How to Write a Lot, Second Edition (American Psychological Association, Washington DC: 2019)

For anyone looking for a short, easy-to-read book with basic tips about writing, this is a good one. Silvia’s writing is friendly and practical at the same time. The book is a broad overview of all aspects of writing, from starting a project through submitting an article or finding a book publisher.

As a psychologist, he spends time dispelling the myths that haunt many writers. In particular, I was intrigued by his dissection of “writer’s block.” He proposes that it doesn’t exist; that it’s a fallacy to explain why writing doesn’t happen. Basically, the only way through it is to write.

Much of his advice is similar to other books about writing, but he writes it without adding fluff or extensive explanations. He integrates examples and distills his advice in ways that make you think “of course I can do that!”

Unique to his book is a chapter about writing grants. Because he comes from academia, this focuses more on getting grants to bring in funding research projects. However, archivists can glean some good advice by thinking of grants as writing projects. Grants are ways to practice writing good context, being concise, and refining language.

This is a great book for new and early writers. It breaks down the writing process in a way that archivists likely did not learn in graduate school. Its simple and practical approach will coach writers through the obstacles and make the process achievable.