CFP: VIEW Journal

Open Call for Article Proposals or Full Articles
Besides our regular themed issues, VIEW Journal now accepts article proposals and full articles for its first open issue. We encourage scholars and audiovisual archivists to use this open call to provide (suggestions for) articles and audiovisual essays, as well as other forms of reflective thought.

Aims and Scope
VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture is the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of European television history and culture. It offers an international platform for outstanding academic research and archival reflection on television as an important part of European cultural heritage. The journal is open to many disciplinary perspectives on European television – including television history, media studies, media sociology, cultural studies and television studies. The journal acts as a space for critical reflection on the cultural, social and political role of television in Europe’s past and present. It also provides a multi-media platform for the presentation and re-use of digitized audiovisual material.

In bridging the gap between academic and archival concerns for television and in analyzing the political and cultural importance of television in a transnational and European perspective, the journal aims at establishing an innovative platform for the critical interpretation and creative use of digitized audio-visual sources. In doing so, it challenges a long tradition of television research that was – and to a huge amount still is – based on the analysis of written sources.

Submitting an Article Proposal or Full Article

For our forthcoming open issue (publication in spring 2021), co-edited by Mari Pajala and Liam Wylie, we invite both creative article ideas in the form of extended proposals and full articles for peer review.

  • Send in your article proposals in the form of extended abstracts at the latest by Feb 1st, 2020, via e-mail, to journal [at] euscreen.eu. Selected abstracts will receive an invitation for full articles within a few weeks.
  • It is also possible to submit full articles up until Jun 1st, 2020, at the very latest. Please submit full articles via the VIEW Submissions form

Audience

The journal aims at stimulating new narrative forms of online storytelling, making use of the rich digitized audiovisual collections of television archives around Europe. Authors are encouraged to make use of audio-visual sources to be embedded in the narrative of the articles: not as “illustrations” of a historical or theoretical argumentation, but as problematized evidence of a research question.

VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture addresses the scientific community as well as a wider audience interested in television as a cultural phenomenon. Broadcast historians, media studies scholars, audiovisual archivists, television professionals as well as the large group of enthusiastic fans of “old” television will have the opportunity to dive into the history and presence of European television by means of multi-media texts.

Contact

If you have questions about the process, do not hesitate to get in touch with managing editor Rieke Böhling or co-editors Mari Pajala and Liam Wylie via the journal’s main contact address: journal [at] euscreen.eu

We are looking forward to receiving your creative proposals (through e-mail) or full articles (here)!

CFP: Symposium on Emergency Planning in Libraries and Archives

Call for proposals for a Symposium on Emergency Planning in Libraries and Archives, held in New Orleans, LA, Friday, July 10, 2020.

We invite you to share your knowledge, expertise, and experiences at a symposium on emergency planning in Libraries and Archives hosted by the Loyola University New Orleans College of Law Library & the Cardozo Law Library. Proposals are welcome on any part of the emergency and disaster planning process, from policy creation to implementation. Libraries and archives have always been vulnerable to weather events that can strike at any time and in multiple forms such as fires, earthquakes, hurricanes, or pest and mold infestations. The ascending effects of global warming have the potential to increase these devastating occurrences and perhaps others unforeseen in the years to come.

This program strives to bring professionals together from all types of institutions and organizations to discuss these threats, how to prepare for them, and share lessons learned.

The program committee invites submissions for 45 or 60 minute sessions on any aspect of emergency or disaster planning including, but not limited to:

  • Policy creation.

  • Policy implementation.

  • After the disaster: lessons learned.

  • Tips and tricks for disaster clean up.

  • Community outreach for personal emergency preparedness.

When submitting proposals please have ready a session title, program abstract up to 250 words, names and contact information for all presenters, the type of session format being  proposed (panel discussion, lecture, lightning talks, open forum, etc), and any A/V needs.

The proposal deadline is midnight, Friday January 31, 2020.

Proposals can be submitted here.

A google spreadsheet is available for those seeking collaborators here .

If you have questions, please contact the organizers:

 

Podcast: Material Memory, CLIR

In theme-based seasons, Material Memory explores the effects of our changing environment—from digital technologies to the climate crisis—on our ability to access the record of our shared humanity, and the critical role that libraries, archives, museums, and other public institutions play in keeping cultural memory alive.

Episode Zero introduces the podcast through a conversation with CLIR President Charles Henry about the threats to our cultural record, what is at stake if it’s lost, and what can be done to protect it.

Season One celebrates the UN-designated Year of Indigenous Languages. In each of six episodes, host Joy Banks speaks with people involved in the work of restoring audio and audiovisual recordings of indigenous languages and their sometimes Herculean efforts to make these recordings accessible to the communities they represent.

Season Two, to be released in spring 2020, will explore the wicked problem of ensuring that born-digital material remains accessible for future generations.

Season Three, to be released in summer 2020, will look at the many ways in which the climate crisis is posing new risks to the survival of our human record.

Call for Participation: Research Survey About Reference Staffing and Scheduling Practices

Good morning, and apologies for any cross-posting –

You are invited to participate in a research survey about reference staffing and scheduling practices in the archives and special collections field (IRB exempt). Survey participants from all types of archives and special collections institutions are encouraged to participate. However, please try to coordinate with your colleagues to ensure only one survey is submitted per institution or library.

lsu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2a8cIMDhPAzQEMR

The survey will close on January 31, 2020.  Please contact me with any questions about the survey or methodology (ahawk1@lsu.edu). Thanks for your time and consideration –

Amanda

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Amanda Hawk
Head of Public and Research Services
LSU Special Collections
Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, LA
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New Case Study: SAA, Teaching with Primary Sources

“Seeing Through Risk in the Special Collections Classroom: A Case for Flexibility” by Marc Brodsky, public services and reference archivist at Virginia Tech, describes a collaboration between special collections and a history class that emphasized engagement with primary sources. A class of 50 students participated in a transcription project involving 120 letters written by a local soldier serving in Europe during World War I that were addressed mostly to his wife in Blacksburg, VA. The project proved especially relevant given the centennial of the United States’ involvement in WWI. Read all about it here.

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SAA Headquarters
Society of American Archivists
Chicago IL
(866) 722-7858
saahq@archivists.org
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CFP: Call for Chapter Proposals on Data Literacy

Dear colleagues,

Do you ever help students or faculty with data? Does that work involve helping them to understand:

  • How to find and interpret data?
  • How to be a critical consumer of data?
  • How to be an ethical producer of data?
  • What it means to decolonize data?
  • Why it’s important to document and share research data?
  • Any other form of data literacy?

Then you are invited and encouraged to submit chapter proposals for an upcoming book to be published by ALA Editions, tentatively titled Teaching Critical Thinking with Numbers: Data Literacy and the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Each chapter should be between 4,000 and 6,000 words, and should include a discussion of the ways in which you and/or your colleagues and institution are incorporating data literacy into your work. Possible topics for these case studies could include, but are not limited to, methods for incorporating data literacy into information literacy instruction, experiences promoting data literacy in digital scholarship projects, or strategies for getting community buy-in for data literacy across your institution. If you have any questions about a topic you are considering, you are encouraged to reach out to Julia Bauder (bauderj@grinnell.edu) to discuss it before submitting a full proposal.

To submit a proposal, please e-mail the following to bauderj@grinnell.edu by February 3, 2020:

  • An approximately 400-word summary of the proposed chapter.
  • For each author:
    • Name, institution, and current title.
    • A list of previous publications.
    • If no previous publications, please include or link to a writing sample.

Timeline:

February 3, 2020: Chapter proposals due.
February 21, 2020: Authors notified of acceptance of chapter proposals.
July 1, 2020: Chapter drafts due.
August 14, 2020: Chapter drafts returned to authors for revisions.
October 17, 2020: Chapter revisions due.

Thank you for considering submitting a proposal. Please, if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to me.

Julia Bauder, editor, Teaching Critical Thinking with Numbers: Data Literacy and the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education

New Issue: Archives and Records

Archives and Records, Vol. 40 no. 3 2019
(subscription)

Articles

From a silent past to a spoken future. Black women’s voices in the archival process
Ria van der Merwe

Records and farmer workers – a unique Chinese case
Sherry L. Xie, Huiling Feng & Linqing Ma

The digital return of ILAM’s Zimbabwean recordings: revitalization of the sound archive through postcolonial engagement between ILAM and African universities
Luis Gimenez Amoros

Formation and development of the Central State Archive of cinema, photographic materials and sound records of the Kazakh SSR (1943–1991)
Gulzira Seksenbayeva

Book Reviews

Metadata for information management and retrieval: understanding metadata and its use
by David Haynes, 2nd edition, London, Facet Publishing, 2018, xiv + 267 pp., £59.95 (paperback), ISBN 978-1-85604-824-8
Paul V. Dudman

Digital curation projects made easy: a step-by-step guide for libraries, archives and museums
by Carmen Cowick, Lanham, Maryland and London, Rowman and Littlefield, 2018, vii + 125 pp., £23.95 (paperback), ISBN 978-1-5381-0351-7 (Library Information Technology Association Guides)

The oral history manual
by Barbara W Sommer and Mary Kay Quinlan, 3rd edition, Lanham, Maryland and London, Rowman and Littlefield, 2018, viii + 145 pp., £24.95 (paperback), ISBN 978-1-4422-7079-4 (American Association for State and Local History Book Series)

The international directory of national archives
edited by Patricia C. Franks and Anthony Bernier, London, Rowman & Littlefield Publishing, 2018, xii + 433 pp., $150/£100 (hardback), ISBN 978-1-442277-434-427
Elizabeth Shepherd

Records and information management
by Patricia C. Franks, 2nd edition, Chicago, ALA/Neal-Schuman, 2018, xxiv + 497 pp., $84.99, ISBN 978-0-8389-1716-9
Geoffrey Yeo

Digital archives: management, use and access
edited by Milena Dobreva, London, Facet Publishing, 2018, xv + 183 pp., £69.95 (paperback), ISBN 978-1-85604-934-4
Alexandra Eveleigh

The complete guide to personal digital archiving
edited by Brianna H Marshall, London, Facet Publishing, 2018, xxii + 275 pp., £59.95 (paperback), ISBN 978-1-78330-266-6
Paul Campbell

The theory and craft of digital preservation
by Trevor Owens, Baltimore, John Hopkins University Press, 2018 x + 226 pp., £26 (paperback) ISBN 978-1-4214-2697-6
Adrian Brown

Digital preservation in libraries: preparing for a sustainable future
edited by Jeremy Myntti and Jessalyn Zoom, Chicago, American Library Association, 2019, xii + 379 pp., $84.99 (paperback), ISBN 978-0-8389-1713-8
Maureen Pennock

The cartulary and charters of the priory of Saints Peter and Paul, Ipswich, part I the Cartulary
edited by David Allen, Woodbridge, The Boydell Press for the Suffolk Records Society, 2018, xix + 292 pp., £60 (hardback), ISBN 978-1-78327-354-6 (Suffolk Records Society, Suffolk Charters)
Anthony Smith

The business of archives: a labour of love
compiled and edited by Tony Slaven and Kiara King, Johnstone, The Ballast Trust, 2018, 83 pp., £5 (paperback), ISBN 978-1-5272-3179-5
Paul J Sillitoe

Records, information and data: exploring the role of record-keeping in an information culture
by Geoffrey Yeo, London, Facet Publishing, 2018, xvi + 208 pp., £69.95 (Paperback), ISBN: 978-1-78330-226-0
Susan Graham

Review

Online guidance on oral history from Manchester Histories Historical Research Project and East Midlands Oral History Archive
Sarah-Joy Maddeaux

Obituary

(Brian) Bernard Ignatius Trainor (1928–2018)
Stephen Scarth

Brian Stanley Smith (1932–2018)
Heather Forbes

Antony David Carr (1938–2019)
Nia Powell