Call for Submissions: 2020 Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards

The ALA/ACRL/RBMS Exhibition Awards Committee is pleased to announce that submissions for the 2020 Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards are being accepted until Tuesday, October 15, 2019. The awards are given annually in recognition of excellence in the publication of catalogs and brochures that accompany exhibitions of library and archival materials, as well as for digital exhibitions of such materials. The prizes are administered and awarded by the  Exhibition Awards Committee. For more information, and a list of previous winners, please see http://www.ala.org/acrl/awards/publicationawards/leabawards.

Submissions of printed materials (4 copies of each catalog or brochure) must be postmarked by October 15. For digital exhibitions, only an entry form is required. The form should be submitted online by October 15.

After judging is completed and the awards announced, the printed materials are sent to The Bancroft Library at UC Berkeley and the Grolier Club in New York City. This constitutes a duplicate archive of the self-selected best work in the field.

We welcome any questions potential submitters may have, and look forward to your entries!

Anna Chen
Chair, Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards Committee
Rare Books & Manuscripts Section, ACRL, ALA

Library Technology: Innovating Technologies, Services, and Practices

This call is not archives-specific, but definitely our technological advancements can contribute to the conversation.

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Technology is ubiquitous and ever evolving in academic libraries ranging from the technology integrated in the physical library space to online presences that connect users to library resources. Keeping up with the constant development to library technology services and practices can be a challenge for any library—there could be financial, space, or staffing constraints in addition to other potential detractors. However, there are also ample opportunities to excel in specific areas of library technology in order to better serve our library users in their research and knowledge creation journey. Academic libraries can share their innovative implementation and management of technologies or technology related services and practices. These conversations drive the future of library technology and technology practices. It all starts with a spark of inspiration.

A CALL FOR PROPOSALS

College & Undergraduate Libraries, a peer-reviewed journal published by Taylor & Francis, invites proposals for a special issue focusing on innovative technologies, technology services and practices in academic libraries. Library technology is broadly defined to be inclusive of the various types of technologies academic libraries support. Potential submissions include research studies, case studies, best practices, or position papers involving:

  • Immersive research or programs such as augmented reality or virtual reality
  • Makerspaces or creation studios
  • Enhancing library space with technology
  • Sustainability and library technology
  • Assessing library technology services using UX practices
  • Evaluating library technology department workflows or functionality
  • Securing library technology
  • Privacy and ethics with library technology or library technology services
  • Internet of Things in an academic library
  • Designing academic library websites or technology services
  • Using analytics to improve a library service or online presence
  • Improving access to library resources via discovery services or library management systems
  • Exploring alternative means of authentication or improving current authentication systems
  • Incorporating machine learning or library data projects
  • Adding technology into library instruction or using innovative technology to teach remote learners
  • Teaching technology in an academic library
  • Intentionally designing learning spaces with technology
  • Using Git or other code repositories for library technology management
  • Strategic planning of technology services
  • Accessibility of library technologies
  • Increasing inclusion using technology
  • Innovative or inspiring library technology projects/programs
  • Technology trends outside the library we should be watching

Submissions may address opportunities, challenges, and criticism in any of these areas. Topics not listed in these themes may also be considered.

This special issue is set to be published in June 2020.

Submitting a Proposal

Proposals should include a title, an abstract (500 words maximum), keywords describing the article (6 keywords max), and author(s) contact information.

Please submit article proposals via email to Tabatha Farney (guest editor) at tfarney@uccs.edu by September 30th, 2019. Final manuscripts are due by February 15, 2020.

Feel free to contact me with any questions that you may have,

Tabatha Farney, guest editor

Director of Web Services and Emerging Technologies

Kraemer Family Library

University of Colorado Colorado Springs

tfarney@uccs.edu

CFP: Online Professional Development Presentations (ACRL) @ALA_ACRL

This call doesn’t specifically mention archives, but particularly with the social justice mention, this is an opportunity to share archival strategies and practices with academic librarians.

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The ACRL ULS Professional Development Committee (PDC) welcomes proposals for online programs that further ACRL members’ professional development, knowledge, and practice. Proposals should be grounded in theory and/or practice. We encourage the use of panels and multiple presenter models to convey a variety of viewpoints. Proposals for programs led by an individual presenter are also accepted. Programs usually run one hour, including time for questions, and are offered via Zoom.

All proposals will be considered, however, we are particularly interested in programs addressing the following topics in 2019-2020:

    • Evolving Models for Public Services and Learning Spaces
    • Critical Librarianship, Diversity and Inclusion, and Social Justice in Academic Libraries
    • Scholarly Communications
    • Data Management and Visualization
    • Changing Roles of Liaison Librarians and Functional Experts
    • Digital Scholarship
    • Assessment and Learning Analytics
    • Identifying and Developing Future Leaders

 

To receive full consideration for the 2019-2020 programming year, submissions should be received by Wednesday, September 18th, 2019. Please submit proposals at https://www.acrl.ala.org/ULS/online-program-proposal-submission-form/.

Please direct questions to Laura Gariepy, Chair of the ACRL ULS Professional Development Committee, at lwgariepy@vcu.edu. The Committee’s prior programs can be found here.

Call for Chapters – Teaching with Archives & Special Collections Cookbook (ACRL Publications)

CALL FOR “RECIPES” (CHAPTER PROPOSALS)

The Teaching with Archives & Special Collections Cookbook is seeking recipes!

We are now accepting recipe proposals detailing lesson plans or projects that demonstrate the integration of archives and special collections material into the classroom. We are seeking practical guides that provide an entry point to teaching with primary sources for information professionals new to teaching and learning with archives and special collections, including archivists, special collections librarians, and instruction librarians. Additionally, we seek innovative proposals that will serve as a resource for those experienced with teaching with primary sources and archives by providing a repository of ideas for when their lesson plans need to be refreshed and updated.

Recipes will include the following:

Recipes will follow the ACRL Cookbook format. Your 600- to 800-word submission must describe a successful lesson plan or activity using archives and special collections material. Please also include:

  • Recipe name (a.k.a. your “chapter” title)
  • Your name, university or other affiliation
  • Your email address, if you would like it included with your recipe (optional)
  • Potential cookbook category, section, and part (see below)

Submission information and due dates:

Email your draft recipes to jmp48@psu.edu by July 16, 2019

Notifications will be sent out in August 2019

Final recipes will be due on October 5, 2019

Cookbook Outline:

  1. Meal Prep: Teaching Archival Literacy

Lessons that prepare students for the situated and unique aspects of doing research in archives and special collections libraries. 

  1. Good Orderer: Teaching Search & Discovery in Archives & Special Collections

Lessons that help students make use of archival search and discovery tools, such as finding aids. 

  1. Food Critics: Teaching Primary Source Literacy

 Lessons that support student analysis of primary sources. 

  1. Something from the Cart: Exhibitions as Teaching & Learning

Lessons that utilize the exhibition of primary sources as a teaching and learning tool. 

  1. Community Picnics: K-12 & Non-course-related Instruction

      Lessons for K-12 & community audiences. 

  1. Takeout: Teaching with Digital Collections

Lessons that utilize digital collections to teach primary sources literacy outside of archives and special collections libraries’ physical spaces. 

Email jmp48@psu.edu with any questions. Please refer to The Embedded Librarians Cookbook (ACRL 2014), The First Year Experience Library Cookbook (ACRL 2017), and The Library Assessment Cookbook (ACRL 2017) for examples of format and tone. We are willing to be flexible with length, wording, style, and topics.  Creativity encouraged! We look forward to your proposals!

Editor:

Julie M. Porterfield, Instruction & Outreach Archivist, Penn State University Libraries

Call for Submissions: 2019 Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards

The ALA/ACRL/RBMS Exhibition Awards Committee is pleased to announce that submissions for the 2019 Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards are being accepted until Monday, October 15, 2018. The awards are given annually in recognition of excellence in the publication of catalogs and brochures that accompany exhibitions of library and archival materials, as well as for digital exhibitions of such materials. The prizes are administered and awarded by the  Exhibition Awards Committee. For more information, and a list of previous winners, please see http://www.ala.org/acrl/awards/publicationawards/leabawards.

Submissions of printed materials (4 copies of each catalog or brochure) must be postmarked by October 15. For digital exhibitions, only an entry form is required. The form should be submitted online by October 15.

After judging is completed and the awards announced, the printed materials are sent to The Bancroft Library at UC Berkeley and the Grolier Club in New York City. This constitutes a duplicate archive of the self-selected best work in the field.

We welcome any questions potential submitters may have, and look forward to your entries!

Anna Chen
Chair, Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards Committee
Rare Books & Manuscripts Section, ACRL, ALA

Anna Chen
Head Librarian
William Andrews Clark Memorial Library
UCLA

Call for Chapters: ACRL’s The Sustainable Library’s Cookbook

This call is for academic archives and though does not specifically mention archives, some of the topics fit.

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Call for Chapters for ACRL’s The Sustainable Library’s Cookbook (2019) edited by Raymond Pun and Dr. Gary L. Shaffer

Deadline extended – July 25, 2018

Send your proposals/questions to raypun101@gmail.com with submissions and questions. Note if you submitted a proposal already to acrlsustainable@gmail.com, please re-send it to raypun101@gmail.com, apologies for that and thank you! (acrlsustainable@gmail.com will be defunct)

We are seeking “recipes” or chapter proposals on practice-based examples of lesson plans or projects that support sustainability efforts in academic libraries. Recipes will follow the ACRL CookbookFormat. Your 500-to-700 word proposal submission should describe a successful lesson plan or activity that support sustainability in the academic library. They can be related to these three key areas:

Section 1. Applying Sustainable Thinking and Development – Applying sustainable thinking into library functions including information technology, finance, facilities, waste management, human resources, space planning, etc.:

  • Triple Bottom Line (financial/economic, environmental, as well as social (internal/workforce and external/social justice and campus community) concepts applied in different areas of library services
  • Installing solar panels in the library, upgrading lighting systems in library facilities, supporting alternatives to driving; green technology, architecture planning; extension; developing strategies to minimize cost, utilize costs;
  • Integrating the UN Sustainable Development Goals 2030 in your library practices
  • Addressing issues of poverty, inequity and food shortage in your campus; dumpster diving projects;
  • Strategic planning for sustainable practices in specific areas of the library; special grant projects or case studies; disaster-planning projects; makerspaces; OER and textbooks; sustainable printing;
  • Assessment/evaluation plans for sustainability practices; marketing sustainability developments in the library

Section 2. Teaching, Learning and Research Services – Supporting sustainability studies in the areas of teaching, learning and research services including information literacy, one-shots, technology, integrating ACRL New Frameworks, threshold concepts, discipline tracks – first year writing, communications, STEM instructions, community of teaching practices, and subject/liaison responsibilities:

  • Teaching FYE STEM using campus sustainability as the research topic
  • Building a data research/scientific data program to support sustainability studies, water studies or renewable energy; ecological and environmental education; green literacy
  • Teaching a information literacy workshop to environmental studies, food studies, agriculture, transportation studies/engineering, sociology, anthropology, political science or urban studies, architecture, business/entrepreneurship/marketing classes that address sustainable development, climate change, green energy, alternative fuels, sustainable housing, clean transportation, etc.
  • Integrating GIS skills and tools in library instruction to support sustainability studies; digital scholarship or humanities/area studies projects covering sustainability/environmental studies
  • Integrating environmental, economic, and social justices in your teaching practices; Liaison to Water/Environmental Institutes/Centers

Section 3. Community Engagement, Outreach, and Partnerships – Forming new partnerships, outreach services or community engagement programs to inform sustainability practices in the library and beyond:

  • Forming partnerships with communities to promote environmental awareness issues
  • Partnering with Career Development Center to host a job/internship fair on green energy and jobs;
  • Collaborating with Sustainability Student Club to coordinate new programs or events in the library such as urban farms, organic food productions, collaborative collection development, green collections; World Water Day, World Earth Day, environmental awareness;
  • Partnerships with public libraries, government agencies, environmental and other community groups for reading clubs, activities, engagements
  • Building local/indigenous knowledge and collaborating with community experts relating to sustainability, ecology, etc.

Deadline for Contributors’ proposals: July 25, 2018 (flexible)
Editors Review + Notification for Contributors: July 30, 2018
Final Recipes due: October 1, 2018

Please refer to the The Library Instruction Cookbook (ACRL 2009) and The First Year Experience Cookbook (ACRL 2017) for examples of format and tone. You can send as many proposals as you like. We are willing to be flexible with wording, style, and topics. Creativity encouraged! We look forward to your proposals! Once the proposal has been accepted, we will happy to send a template over.

Any questions? Need to submit? Send email to raypun101@gmail.com

Co-editors:
Raymond Pun, California State University, Fresno and Dr. Gary L. Shaffer, USC Marshall School of Business

Call for Chapter Proposals: Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs: Structures, Practices, and Contexts

This call does not specifically mention archives, but the call is open to topics other than what’s listed.

_____________________________________________________________________

We are soliciting chapter proposals for our forthcoming ACRL book, Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs: Structures, Practices, and Contexts with an anticipated publication date of August 2019. Information literacy (IL) is a well-established goal of academic libraries, yet so much of the day-to-day work of running and coordinating information literacy programs is absent from professional literature, job descriptions, and library school coursework. While the definition of a program is a coordinated set of activities in service of a specific purpose, what those activities actually consist of – and who is responsible for them – is highly dependent on institutional and interpersonal contexts. Furthermore, while skills and competencies for leadership in LIS are well-researched and articulated, those required for effective program management, particularly indirect management of others, are not as well-represented. This book will gather program examples to make visible the structures, practices, and contexts of information literacy programs in academic libraries

We are seeking chapters from academic librarians who identify as a leader of an information literacy program who want to share their experiences.

Focus of the Book:

This edited volume will present a series of structured case studies written by leaders of information literacy programs across the United States and Canada. Each chapter will detail definitions and missions, allocation of resources and labor, supervisory structures, prioritization approaches, and other processes and structures required to make programs work. By following the same template we will help identify commonalities and differences across all types of programs and institutions while allowing individual stories and unique contexts to shine through. Don’t worry; we’ll provide the template! This book’s intended audience is new and aspiring information literacy program coordinators, administrators, and seasoned coordinators, looking for examples, evidence, and strategies to grow and/or sustain new or existing programs.

Anticipated Program Types:

  • One-person IL programs
  • Community College IL programs
  • IL within its own instruction department
  • IL distributed across a liaison model
  • New or newly revived programs
  • Long-standing legacy programs

Don’t see your program represented here? Perfect! We definitely want you to submit your proposal! If you have any questions contact the editors at hiddenarchitecturesbook@gmail.com to discuss how your idea may fit within this book’s scope.

Proposal Guidelines:

To submit a proposal, fill out the short online proposal form. The form will require:

  • Author names, job titles, and institutional affiliations
  • Up to 500-word description of your program including type of institution and population served
  • 1-2 sentence description for each template area of what you plan to discuss if your proposal is accepted for inclusion

Proposals are due by August 1, 2018 and must be submitted via online form: http://bit.ly/SubmitHiddenArch

Acceptance

  • Contributors will be notified of their status (acceptance or rejection) within 3-4 weeks of the due date of proposals.
  • Proposals will be conditionally accepted based on the authentic snapshot of their program as represented in the template and description. We’re looking for the realities of coordinating a program in its entirety and not just best practices or one shiny project.
  • In the final collection we aim to represent a range of program and institution types; this will influence which proposals are accepted.
  •  
  • Final chapter format should follow the Endnotes-Bibliography format in the Chicago Manual of Style (17th edition) and the Chapter Template here.
  • ACRL will send publication agreements to individual chapter authors that allow them to keep copyright of their chapters, apply a CC license of their choosing, and request final copies for their institutional repositories, indexing sites, etc.

Timeline

  • The first draft of chapters will be due November 2018, second draft in January 2019, and final draft in April 2019
  • Estimated length of chapter: 2,500–4,000 words
  • Projected publication date: August 2019

Contact us at: hiddenarchitecturesbook@gmail.com

~~~

Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Information Literacy Coordinator, Cal State Dominguez Hills
Elizabeth Galoozis, Head of Information Literacy, University of Southern California
Rebecca Halpern, Teaching & Learning Services Coordinator, The Claremont Colleges