Call for Chapters: Teaching Critical Reading Skills: Strategies for Academic Librarians Published by ACRL Press

Have you created library instructional or outreach activities focused on student reading? If you have case studies, lesson plans, stories, or programmatic approaches aimed at developing active, engaged, mindful, and critical readers, we want to hear from you.

Focus of the Book:

Librarians engage with student reading in a variety of ways: We work with students as they learn to become part of their disciplinary communities and practice reading scholarly articles, interpreting historical information from archival materials, and drawing conclusions based on information from unfamiliar source types like government documents, patents, figures, data, or works of criticism. This book will offer strategies for librarians working across a range of disciplinary areas so they can engage students who need to learn how to read in order to work, understand, and create new knowledge in their field.

We also work with students as they become critical, engaged citizens. We interact with students as they learn to make sense of information in web-based environments where authorship is often uncertain, take active steps to triangulate the information they find, and make decisions based on social media sources where bias and filter bubbles are inherent. We also work with student readers who come from a variety of backgrounds (e.g., non-native English speakers) and who are at different stages in their academic journey (e.g., transfer students or graduate students). This book will offer strategies that take into account librarians’ unique instructional opportunities to encourage students who read in order to understand, empathize, and create change.

Potential Chapter Topics May Include But Are Not Limited To:

  • Critical Reading – Defined and Examples in Practice
  • Primary Source Literacy (i.e., Special Collections and Archives) and Critical Reading
  • Reading for different student audiences – examples could include expert vs. novice approaches, reading instruction for first-year students, transfer students, or graduate students’ reading practices
  • Programmatic Approaches to Reading Programs
  • Community College Librarians and Critical Reading
  • Reading Scholarly Articles
  • Reading Beyond Scholarly Articles
  • Reading Emotionally Difficult Material
  • Reading in the Disciplines (i.e., sciences, social sciences, humanities)
  • Reading for Non-native English Speakers
  • Strategies for comprehending data or health resources
  • Reading strategies for different source types (e.g., opinion pieces, government documents, books…)

Submission Procedure:

Please submit an initial chapter proposal description of up to 500 words and a tentative chapter title. As part of your proposal description, please include a brief description of the practical content you will include in your chapter (e.g., lesson plan, instructional activity, assignment, outreach plan, or model for creating a campus program). Please also include the author(s)’ names, titles, and institutional affiliations, along with a link to current CV (or copy relevant info from your CV, which may be abbreviated to focus on information relevant to your experiences either with instruction and outreach or relevant publishing history).

Please submit proposals to: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSepZQVtqxnLvjRZLdGvhiVIFnIL5JWQFSq79xx0vLQqXdkJCg/viewform?usp=sf_link

Proposals are due by October 1, 2020.** Authors will be notified of their status (accept or decline) by November 15, 2020. A first draft of approximately 2000-5000 words (excluding endnotes and bibliography) will be due on February 15, 2021, and after receiving editorial feedback, a final draft will be due on July 31, 2021. Chapters must not be previously published or simultaneously submitted elsewhere.

**Special note – we very much understand that these are extremely strange and difficult times. If you have an idea but aren’t sure what your schedule looks like for fall/winter, please still contact us to express interest and share your idea. We’ll see what we can figure out together.**

Anticipated book publication date will be early 2022. Chapter authors will be able to make their chapters open access by posting final copies of their chapter in their institutional repositories.

For additional information, contact:

Hannah Gascho Rempel, Professor and Science Librarian, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR  – Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu

Rachel Hamelers, Teaching and Learning Librarian, Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA – rachelhamelers@muhlenberg.edu

Preservation Week Reading

From the Stacks: ACRL Publications Exploring Issues in Special Collections and Archives

Catch up on your reading during Preservation Week! As we celebrate the preservation of our personal and shared collections, today we’re showcasing ACRL publications that explore issues in special collections and archives. Check them out and discuss as part of the #preswk conversation. And don’t forget, e-books purchased through the ALA Store through June 30 are 50% off with code EBPP20!

See full post with recommended reading

ACRL’s Publications in Librarianship Monograph Series Announces First Open Peer Review

This has nothing to do with archives, but I find this a very interesting project – to have an open peer-review. Anyone can participate as long as they agree to the terms.


ACRL’s Publications in Librarianship (PIL) series—a peer-reviewed collection of books that examine emerging theories and research—is launching its first open peer review, for Stories of Open: Opening Peer Review through Narrative Inquiry by Emily Ford.

“Open access, open data, open science, and other ‘open’ initiatives bring democratization and transparency to scholarly publishing and access to information,” said PIL Editor Daniel C. Mack. “Rather than limiting the assessment and evaluation of research to a single editor or editorial board, open peer review empowers the entire community of scholars to participate in the review process. Stories of Open presents readers with a thought-provoking introduction to open peer review; we couldn’t imagine a better manuscript for our pilot open review.”

The manuscript is open for comment through Monday, March 23, 2020. It is available for review in two places, and we welcome and encourage your participation: First, via Google documents here, where participants will need to use their Google account and request access at the top left before commenting. Doing so means agreeing to the reviewer’s code of conduct. A PDF version of the manuscript is available for review on the ACRL site. Comments should be sent to Daniel C. Mack at dmack@umd.edu.

Stories of Open is expected to publish in early 2021. Previous PIL books can be found in the ALA Store; information on publishing in the series is here. Questions on the review, process, or publishing with ACRL can be sent to ACRL Content Strategist Erin Nevius at enevius@ala.org.

Call for Chapters: Learning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries

Call for Book Chapter Proposals

Working titleLearning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries

Proposal submission deadline: January 27th, 2020

Editors: Arianne Hartsell-Gundy (Duke University), Kim Duckett (Duke University), Sarah Morris (University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill)

Publisher: Association of College & Research Libraries

Chapter proposals are invited for Learning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries, a book examining how academic librarians can best support interns, graduate assistants, and practicum and field experience students (both LIS and other fields). We welcome proposals focused on philosophical perspectives, practical strategies, reflective essays, and/or case studies. In addition to contributions from staff working in academic libraries, we welcome contributions from LIS faculty and current and recent graduate students.

Proposals are sought for chapters related to the following themes. Proposals should be between 250-300 words, and final chapters will be between 3000-4000 words.

Preparing Graduate Students for Professional Roles

This section will explore how internships, assistantships, practicums, and field experiences can support the learning of graduate students in order to help readers consider how these programs benefit graduate students and how they might want to structure such learning experience in their institutions. We hope to see explorations of skill-based training and discussions of how to most effectively mentor graduate students through hands-on work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • The role of internships, field experiences, and practicums in LIS or other forms of graduate education
  • Developing professional workplace skills (e.g: time management, project management, workplace communication, reflective practice, self-awareness)
  • Preparing graduate students for the job search – job hunting, applying for professional positions, resume development, interview preparation

Logistics & Structures for Designing Graduate Student Work Experiences

This section will look at how to administer these types of positions and programs in order for readers to gain a bigger picture of what it takes to oversee this work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Strategies for structuring learning experiences for students (either programs or individualized experiences)
  • Interviewing, selecting and/or hiring
  • Developing a diverse and inclusive workforce and environment
  • Onboarding and approaches to training
  • Program assessment

Ethical Considerations

This section will examine the complex ethical issues surrounding these types of graduate experiences in order to help the reader consider how they will address these questions in their work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Issues surrounding paid versus unpaid labor
  • Ensuring students receive credit for their work (e.g. course credit, acknowledgement)
  • Issues related to balancing the organization’s needs and students’ learning and professional development needs

Managers’ Perspectives

This section will address the experience of the managers of these work experiences in order to give both new and seasoned managers insight into what these experiences will mean for them.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Tips for mentoring and coaching
  • The first-time manager perspective
  • Emotional labor, boundaries, and self-care
  • How to make it meaningful for you, your work, and your own professional goals

Students’ Perspectives

This section highlights LIS students’ perspectives on positive and negative aspects of their work experiences, and practical advice for making the most out of their internships, assistantships, etc.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Finding and designing meaningful graduate student work experience(s)
  • Strategies for self-advocacy
  • Perspectives on career-preparedness
  • Navigating workplace dynamics as a temporary employee
  • Balancing work responsibilities with coursework and life experiences

Submission Procedure

Proposals should be submitted as a single email attachment to learninginactionlibraries@gmail.com

Proposals should include:

  • Author name(s), institutional affiliation(s), job title(s)
  • Brief description of your experience as a graduate student or working with graduate students in academic libraries
  • Brief statement of your interests in professional writing
  • Clear description of the topic you are proposing for a potential chapter (about 250-300 words)

Important dates:

Proposals due: January 27th, 2020
Authors notified and sent chapter guidelines: March 15th, 2020
Full chapters due: June 29th, 2020
Final revised chapters due: November 16th, 2020

For additional information contact:

Arianne Hartsell-Gundy, Duke University Libraries: arianne.hartsell.gundy@duke.edu

Call for Book Chapter Proposals: Learning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries

Call for Book Chapter Proposals

Working titleLearning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries

Proposal submission deadline: January 27th, 2020

Editors: Arianne Hartsell-Gundy (Duke University), Kim Duckett (Duke University), Sarah Morris (University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill)

Publisher: Association of College & Research Libraries

Chapter proposals are invited for Learning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries, a book examining how academic librarians can best support interns, graduate assistants, and practicum and field experience students (both LIS and other fields). We welcome proposals focused on philosophical perspectives, practical strategies, reflective essays, and/or case studies. In addition to contributions from staff working in academic libraries, we welcome contributions from LIS faculty and current and recent graduate students.

Proposals are sought for chapters related to the following themes. Proposals should be between 250-300 words, and final chapters will be between 3000-4000 words.

Preparing Graduate Students for Professional Roles

This section will explore how internships, assistantships, practicums, and field experiences can support the learning of graduate students in order to help readers consider how these programs benefit graduate students and how they might want to structure such learning experience in their institutions. We hope to see explorations of skill-based training and discussions of how to most effectively mentor graduate students through hands-on work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • The role of internships, field experiences, and practicums in LIS or other forms of graduate education
  • Developing professional workplace skills (e.g: “soft skills,” time management, project management, workplace communication, reflective practice, self-awareness)
  • Preparing graduate students for the job search – job hunting, applying for professional positions, resume development, interview preparation

Logistics & Structures for Designing Graduate Student Work Experiences

This section will look at how to administer these types of positions and programs in order for readers to gain a bigger picture of what it takes to oversee this work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Strategies for structuring learning experiences for students (either programs or individualized experiences)
  • Interviewing, selecting and/or hiring
  • Developing a diverse and inclusive workforce and environment
  • Onboarding and approaches to training
  • Program assessment

Ethical Considerations

This section will examine the complex ethical issues surrounding these types of graduate experiences in order to help the reader consider how they will address these questions in their work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Issues surrounding paid versus unpaid labor
  • Ensuring students receive credit for their work (e.g. course credit, acknowledgement)
  • Issues related to balancing the organization’s needs and students’ learning and professional development needs

Managers’ Perspectives

This section will address the experience of the managers of these work experiences in order to give both new and seasoned managers insight into what these experiences will mean for them.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Tips for mentoring and coaching
  • The first-time manager perspective
  • Emotional labor, boundaries, and self-care
  • How to make it meaningful for you, your work, and your own professional goals

Students’ Perspectives

This section highlights LIS students’ perspectives on positive and negative aspects of their work experiences, and practical advice for making the most out of their internships, assistantships, etc.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Finding and designing meaningful graduate student work experience(s)
  • Strategies for self-advocacy
  • Perspectives on career-preparedness
  • Navigating workplace dynamics as a temporary employee
  • Balancing work responsibilities with coursework and life experiences

Submission Procedure

Proposals should be submitted as a single email attachment to learninginactionlibraries@gmail.com

Proposals should include:

  • Author name(s), institutional affiliation(s), job title(s)
  • Brief description of your experience as a graduate student or working with graduate students in academic libraries
  • Brief statement of your interests in professional writing
  • Clear description of the topic you are proposing for a potential chapter (about 250-300 words)

Important dates:

Proposals due: January 27th, 2020
Authors notified and sent chapter guidelines: March 15th, 2020
Full chapters due: June 29th, 2020
Final revised chapters due: November 16th, 2020

For additional information contact:

Arianne Hartsell-Gundy, Duke University Libraries: arianne.hartsell.gundy@duke.edu

Call for Submissions: 2020 Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards

The ALA/ACRL/RBMS Exhibition Awards Committee is pleased to announce that submissions for the 2020 Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards are being accepted until Tuesday, October 15, 2019. The awards are given annually in recognition of excellence in the publication of catalogs and brochures that accompany exhibitions of library and archival materials, as well as for digital exhibitions of such materials. The prizes are administered and awarded by the  Exhibition Awards Committee. For more information, and a list of previous winners, please see http://www.ala.org/acrl/awards/publicationawards/leabawards.

Submissions of printed materials (4 copies of each catalog or brochure) must be postmarked by October 15. For digital exhibitions, only an entry form is required. The form should be submitted online by October 15.

After judging is completed and the awards announced, the printed materials are sent to The Bancroft Library at UC Berkeley and the Grolier Club in New York City. This constitutes a duplicate archive of the self-selected best work in the field.

We welcome any questions potential submitters may have, and look forward to your entries!

Anna Chen
Chair, Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards Committee
Rare Books & Manuscripts Section, ACRL, ALA

Library Technology: Innovating Technologies, Services, and Practices

This call is not archives-specific, but definitely our technological advancements can contribute to the conversation.

_________________________________

Technology is ubiquitous and ever evolving in academic libraries ranging from the technology integrated in the physical library space to online presences that connect users to library resources. Keeping up with the constant development to library technology services and practices can be a challenge for any library—there could be financial, space, or staffing constraints in addition to other potential detractors. However, there are also ample opportunities to excel in specific areas of library technology in order to better serve our library users in their research and knowledge creation journey. Academic libraries can share their innovative implementation and management of technologies or technology related services and practices. These conversations drive the future of library technology and technology practices. It all starts with a spark of inspiration.

A CALL FOR PROPOSALS

College & Undergraduate Libraries, a peer-reviewed journal published by Taylor & Francis, invites proposals for a special issue focusing on innovative technologies, technology services and practices in academic libraries. Library technology is broadly defined to be inclusive of the various types of technologies academic libraries support. Potential submissions include research studies, case studies, best practices, or position papers involving:

  • Immersive research or programs such as augmented reality or virtual reality
  • Makerspaces or creation studios
  • Enhancing library space with technology
  • Sustainability and library technology
  • Assessing library technology services using UX practices
  • Evaluating library technology department workflows or functionality
  • Securing library technology
  • Privacy and ethics with library technology or library technology services
  • Internet of Things in an academic library
  • Designing academic library websites or technology services
  • Using analytics to improve a library service or online presence
  • Improving access to library resources via discovery services or library management systems
  • Exploring alternative means of authentication or improving current authentication systems
  • Incorporating machine learning or library data projects
  • Adding technology into library instruction or using innovative technology to teach remote learners
  • Teaching technology in an academic library
  • Intentionally designing learning spaces with technology
  • Using Git or other code repositories for library technology management
  • Strategic planning of technology services
  • Accessibility of library technologies
  • Increasing inclusion using technology
  • Innovative or inspiring library technology projects/programs
  • Technology trends outside the library we should be watching

Submissions may address opportunities, challenges, and criticism in any of these areas. Topics not listed in these themes may also be considered.

This special issue is set to be published in June 2020.

Submitting a Proposal

Proposals should include a title, an abstract (500 words maximum), keywords describing the article (6 keywords max), and author(s) contact information.

Please submit article proposals via email to Tabatha Farney (guest editor) at tfarney@uccs.edu by September 30th, 2019. Final manuscripts are due by February 15, 2020.

Feel free to contact me with any questions that you may have,

Tabatha Farney, guest editor

Director of Web Services and Emerging Technologies

Kraemer Family Library

University of Colorado Colorado Springs

tfarney@uccs.edu

CFP: Online Professional Development Presentations (ACRL) @ALA_ACRL

This call doesn’t specifically mention archives, but particularly with the social justice mention, this is an opportunity to share archival strategies and practices with academic librarians.

__________________________________________

The ACRL ULS Professional Development Committee (PDC) welcomes proposals for online programs that further ACRL members’ professional development, knowledge, and practice. Proposals should be grounded in theory and/or practice. We encourage the use of panels and multiple presenter models to convey a variety of viewpoints. Proposals for programs led by an individual presenter are also accepted. Programs usually run one hour, including time for questions, and are offered via Zoom.

All proposals will be considered, however, we are particularly interested in programs addressing the following topics in 2019-2020:

    • Evolving Models for Public Services and Learning Spaces
    • Critical Librarianship, Diversity and Inclusion, and Social Justice in Academic Libraries
    • Scholarly Communications
    • Data Management and Visualization
    • Changing Roles of Liaison Librarians and Functional Experts
    • Digital Scholarship
    • Assessment and Learning Analytics
    • Identifying and Developing Future Leaders

 

To receive full consideration for the 2019-2020 programming year, submissions should be received by Wednesday, September 18th, 2019. Please submit proposals at https://www.acrl.ala.org/ULS/online-program-proposal-submission-form/.

Please direct questions to Laura Gariepy, Chair of the ACRL ULS Professional Development Committee, at lwgariepy@vcu.edu. The Committee’s prior programs can be found here.

Call for Chapters – Teaching with Archives & Special Collections Cookbook (ACRL Publications)

CALL FOR “RECIPES” (CHAPTER PROPOSALS)

The Teaching with Archives & Special Collections Cookbook is seeking recipes!

We are now accepting recipe proposals detailing lesson plans or projects that demonstrate the integration of archives and special collections material into the classroom. We are seeking practical guides that provide an entry point to teaching with primary sources for information professionals new to teaching and learning with archives and special collections, including archivists, special collections librarians, and instruction librarians. Additionally, we seek innovative proposals that will serve as a resource for those experienced with teaching with primary sources and archives by providing a repository of ideas for when their lesson plans need to be refreshed and updated.

Recipes will include the following:

Recipes will follow the ACRL Cookbook format. Your 600- to 800-word submission must describe a successful lesson plan or activity using archives and special collections material. Please also include:

  • Recipe name (a.k.a. your “chapter” title)
  • Your name, university or other affiliation
  • Your email address, if you would like it included with your recipe (optional)
  • Potential cookbook category, section, and part (see below)

Submission information and due dates:

Email your draft recipes to jmp48@psu.edu by July 16, 2019

Notifications will be sent out in August 2019

Final recipes will be due on October 5, 2019

Cookbook Outline:

  1. Meal Prep: Teaching Archival Literacy

Lessons that prepare students for the situated and unique aspects of doing research in archives and special collections libraries. 

  1. Good Orderer: Teaching Search & Discovery in Archives & Special Collections

Lessons that help students make use of archival search and discovery tools, such as finding aids. 

  1. Food Critics: Teaching Primary Source Literacy

 Lessons that support student analysis of primary sources. 

  1. Something from the Cart: Exhibitions as Teaching & Learning

Lessons that utilize the exhibition of primary sources as a teaching and learning tool. 

  1. Community Picnics: K-12 & Non-course-related Instruction

      Lessons for K-12 & community audiences. 

  1. Takeout: Teaching with Digital Collections

Lessons that utilize digital collections to teach primary sources literacy outside of archives and special collections libraries’ physical spaces. 

Email jmp48@psu.edu with any questions. Please refer to The Embedded Librarians Cookbook (ACRL 2014), The First Year Experience Library Cookbook (ACRL 2017), and The Library Assessment Cookbook (ACRL 2017) for examples of format and tone. We are willing to be flexible with length, wording, style, and topics.  Creativity encouraged! We look forward to your proposals!

Editor:

Julie M. Porterfield, Instruction & Outreach Archivist, Penn State University Libraries