Call for Submissions: 2019 Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards

The ALA/ACRL/RBMS Exhibition Awards Committee is pleased to announce that submissions for the 2019 Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards are being accepted until Monday, October 15, 2018. The awards are given annually in recognition of excellence in the publication of catalogs and brochures that accompany exhibitions of library and archival materials, as well as for digital exhibitions of such materials. The prizes are administered and awarded by the  Exhibition Awards Committee. For more information, and a list of previous winners, please see http://www.ala.org/acrl/awards/publicationawards/leabawards.

Submissions of printed materials (4 copies of each catalog or brochure) must be postmarked by October 15. For digital exhibitions, only an entry form is required. The form should be submitted online by October 15.

After judging is completed and the awards announced, the printed materials are sent to The Bancroft Library at UC Berkeley and the Grolier Club in New York City. This constitutes a duplicate archive of the self-selected best work in the field.

We welcome any questions potential submitters may have, and look forward to your entries!

Anna Chen
Chair, Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards Committee
Rare Books & Manuscripts Section, ACRL, ALA

Anna Chen
Head Librarian
William Andrews Clark Memorial Library
UCLA

Call for Chapters: ACRL’s The Sustainable Library’s Cookbook

This call is for academic archives and though does not specifically mention archives, some of the topics fit.

_____________________________________________

Call for Chapters for ACRL’s The Sustainable Library’s Cookbook (2019) edited by Raymond Pun and Dr. Gary L. Shaffer

Deadline extended – July 25, 2018

Send your proposals/questions to raypun101@gmail.com with submissions and questions. Note if you submitted a proposal already to acrlsustainable@gmail.com, please re-send it to raypun101@gmail.com, apologies for that and thank you! (acrlsustainable@gmail.com will be defunct)

We are seeking “recipes” or chapter proposals on practice-based examples of lesson plans or projects that support sustainability efforts in academic libraries. Recipes will follow the ACRL CookbookFormat. Your 500-to-700 word proposal submission should describe a successful lesson plan or activity that support sustainability in the academic library. They can be related to these three key areas:

Section 1. Applying Sustainable Thinking and Development – Applying sustainable thinking into library functions including information technology, finance, facilities, waste management, human resources, space planning, etc.:

  • Triple Bottom Line (financial/economic, environmental, as well as social (internal/workforce and external/social justice and campus community) concepts applied in different areas of library services
  • Installing solar panels in the library, upgrading lighting systems in library facilities, supporting alternatives to driving; green technology, architecture planning; extension; developing strategies to minimize cost, utilize costs;
  • Integrating the UN Sustainable Development Goals 2030 in your library practices
  • Addressing issues of poverty, inequity and food shortage in your campus; dumpster diving projects;
  • Strategic planning for sustainable practices in specific areas of the library; special grant projects or case studies; disaster-planning projects; makerspaces; OER and textbooks; sustainable printing;
  • Assessment/evaluation plans for sustainability practices; marketing sustainability developments in the library

Section 2. Teaching, Learning and Research Services – Supporting sustainability studies in the areas of teaching, learning and research services including information literacy, one-shots, technology, integrating ACRL New Frameworks, threshold concepts, discipline tracks – first year writing, communications, STEM instructions, community of teaching practices, and subject/liaison responsibilities:

  • Teaching FYE STEM using campus sustainability as the research topic
  • Building a data research/scientific data program to support sustainability studies, water studies or renewable energy; ecological and environmental education; green literacy
  • Teaching a information literacy workshop to environmental studies, food studies, agriculture, transportation studies/engineering, sociology, anthropology, political science or urban studies, architecture, business/entrepreneurship/marketing classes that address sustainable development, climate change, green energy, alternative fuels, sustainable housing, clean transportation, etc.
  • Integrating GIS skills and tools in library instruction to support sustainability studies; digital scholarship or humanities/area studies projects covering sustainability/environmental studies
  • Integrating environmental, economic, and social justices in your teaching practices; Liaison to Water/Environmental Institutes/Centers

Section 3. Community Engagement, Outreach, and Partnerships – Forming new partnerships, outreach services or community engagement programs to inform sustainability practices in the library and beyond:

  • Forming partnerships with communities to promote environmental awareness issues
  • Partnering with Career Development Center to host a job/internship fair on green energy and jobs;
  • Collaborating with Sustainability Student Club to coordinate new programs or events in the library such as urban farms, organic food productions, collaborative collection development, green collections; World Water Day, World Earth Day, environmental awareness;
  • Partnerships with public libraries, government agencies, environmental and other community groups for reading clubs, activities, engagements
  • Building local/indigenous knowledge and collaborating with community experts relating to sustainability, ecology, etc.

Deadline for Contributors’ proposals: July 25, 2018 (flexible)
Editors Review + Notification for Contributors: July 30, 2018
Final Recipes due: October 1, 2018

Please refer to the The Library Instruction Cookbook (ACRL 2009) and The First Year Experience Cookbook (ACRL 2017) for examples of format and tone. You can send as many proposals as you like. We are willing to be flexible with wording, style, and topics. Creativity encouraged! We look forward to your proposals! Once the proposal has been accepted, we will happy to send a template over.

Any questions? Need to submit? Send email to raypun101@gmail.com

Co-editors:
Raymond Pun, California State University, Fresno and Dr. Gary L. Shaffer, USC Marshall School of Business

Call for Chapter Proposals: Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs: Structures, Practices, and Contexts

This call does not specifically mention archives, but the call is open to topics other than what’s listed.

_____________________________________________________________________

We are soliciting chapter proposals for our forthcoming ACRL book, Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs: Structures, Practices, and Contexts with an anticipated publication date of August 2019. Information literacy (IL) is a well-established goal of academic libraries, yet so much of the day-to-day work of running and coordinating information literacy programs is absent from professional literature, job descriptions, and library school coursework. While the definition of a program is a coordinated set of activities in service of a specific purpose, what those activities actually consist of – and who is responsible for them – is highly dependent on institutional and interpersonal contexts. Furthermore, while skills and competencies for leadership in LIS are well-researched and articulated, those required for effective program management, particularly indirect management of others, are not as well-represented. This book will gather program examples to make visible the structures, practices, and contexts of information literacy programs in academic libraries

We are seeking chapters from academic librarians who identify as a leader of an information literacy program who want to share their experiences.

Focus of the Book:

This edited volume will present a series of structured case studies written by leaders of information literacy programs across the United States and Canada. Each chapter will detail definitions and missions, allocation of resources and labor, supervisory structures, prioritization approaches, and other processes and structures required to make programs work. By following the same template we will help identify commonalities and differences across all types of programs and institutions while allowing individual stories and unique contexts to shine through. Don’t worry; we’ll provide the template! This book’s intended audience is new and aspiring information literacy program coordinators, administrators, and seasoned coordinators, looking for examples, evidence, and strategies to grow and/or sustain new or existing programs.

Anticipated Program Types:

  • One-person IL programs
  • Community College IL programs
  • IL within its own instruction department
  • IL distributed across a liaison model
  • New or newly revived programs
  • Long-standing legacy programs

Don’t see your program represented here? Perfect! We definitely want you to submit your proposal! If you have any questions contact the editors at hiddenarchitecturesbook@gmail.com to discuss how your idea may fit within this book’s scope.

Proposal Guidelines:

To submit a proposal, fill out the short online proposal form. The form will require:

  • Author names, job titles, and institutional affiliations
  • Up to 500-word description of your program including type of institution and population served
  • 1-2 sentence description for each template area of what you plan to discuss if your proposal is accepted for inclusion

Proposals are due by August 1, 2018 and must be submitted via online form: http://bit.ly/SubmitHiddenArch

Acceptance

  • Contributors will be notified of their status (acceptance or rejection) within 3-4 weeks of the due date of proposals.
  • Proposals will be conditionally accepted based on the authentic snapshot of their program as represented in the template and description. We’re looking for the realities of coordinating a program in its entirety and not just best practices or one shiny project.
  • In the final collection we aim to represent a range of program and institution types; this will influence which proposals are accepted.
  •  
  • Final chapter format should follow the Endnotes-Bibliography format in the Chicago Manual of Style (17th edition) and the Chapter Template here.
  • ACRL will send publication agreements to individual chapter authors that allow them to keep copyright of their chapters, apply a CC license of their choosing, and request final copies for their institutional repositories, indexing sites, etc.

Timeline

  • The first draft of chapters will be due November 2018, second draft in January 2019, and final draft in April 2019
  • Estimated length of chapter: 2,500–4,000 words
  • Projected publication date: August 2019

Contact us at: hiddenarchitecturesbook@gmail.com

~~~

Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Information Literacy Coordinator, Cal State Dominguez Hills
Elizabeth Galoozis, Head of Information Literacy, University of Southern California
Rebecca Halpern, Teaching & Learning Services Coordinator, The Claremont Colleges

Call for Book Chapter Proposals: Becoming a Practitioner-Researcher: A Practical Guide for Information Professionals

Thank you to Caryn Radick for passing this on!

_____________________________________________________________________________________
Dear colleagues,
We are soliciting chapter proposals for our forthcoming ACRL book, Becoming a Practitioner-Researcher: A Practical Guide for Information Professionals [working title]This book will gather practical advice from practitioners conducting research as part of their tenure or professional responsibilities at academic, public, and special libraries, and/or archives. We are seeking chapters from novice or seasoned practitioner-researchers who want to share their experiences in executing research and/or evaluation projects.

Focus of the Book:
This edited volume will address the challenges of undertaking research and offers support and advice for all stages of a project, from writing the proposal to collecting the data, to disseminating the findings whether it be an internal report or published journal article, and the myriad pitfalls that may occur in between.

Rather than focusing solely on methods, this book tackles issues such as balancing research project and work responsibilities, scaling your project to fit your budget and time constraints, collaborating with a partner or team, and other issues that impact projects. Our vision for this book is to curate an edited volume of insights that we wish we would have known when we embarked on our own research projects. Chapters will introduce and discuss a specific project in a specific institution, in order to frame the discussion of the aspects of the research process the chapter addresses. The narrative should be reflective and discuss what can be generalized about the experience that would be helpful for other practitioners in a “lessons learned” approach.

Part 1: The Research Process (starting your research, crafting a proposal, figuring out logistics)
Part 1 is about creating a holistic approach to undertaking research in a library or archive setting. We are seeking chapters that include sections addressing topics such as, but not limited to:

  • Developing an idea into a research proposal
  • Obtaining administrative buy-in and support
  • Budgeting (time, money, personnel)
  • Choosing a research design and data collection method
  • Navigating the IRB process
  • Deciding on the scale of a project and what is feasible
  • Analyzing your data
  • Sharing research (reports, formal outlets including journals)

We chose the term holistic because we feel the chapters should integrate several of the above bullet points when reflecting on research project experiences in the context of their library.

Part 2: Social Research Methods for Information Professionals (survey, content analysis observation studies, focus group, interviews, etc.) 
Part 2 is about the application of common research methods found in the library literature. Chapters should revolve around creating a research design and reflect on the realities of research practice, conveying to readers methods that worked well for particular contexts and projects. Each chapter in Part 2 will include sections on how the particular method was applied, the institutional context, and the bumps and bruises of going from research design to data collection. Please address these sections in your proposal if you are seeking inclusion in Part 2.
Potential topics include:

  • Surveys
  • Focus groups
  • Ethnographic methods (observation, visual, storytelling)
  • Interviews
  • Document/content/textual analysis

Part 3: Managing a Research Project (individual researchers and team-based collaboration)
Part 3 will bring into focus the experiences of individual researchers and teams. The purpose of this section is to provide readers a range of basic and complex project examples and how these projects have been managed by individual practitioners or collaborative teams.
Example topics for inclusion in a chapter:

  • Project management as a solo researcher
  • How teams determine responsibilities for a project
  • Cleaning and analysis of data as a team
  • Collaborating on cross-institutional projects
  • Publishing or writing as a team
  • Short reflective essays by individuals who have been both solo researchers and on a research team

Don’t see your topic here? Contact the editors at libresearcherbook@gmail.com to discuss how your idea may fit within this book’s scope.

Proposal Guidelines:
To submit a proposal,  fill out the short Survey Monkey form and attach your proposal as a Word document (.doc or .docx). The form will require author names, job titles, and institutional affiliations. The Word document for the proposal itself should be written in Times New Roman, 12 pt., be double-spaced, and include:

  • A working title for your chapter
  • A 500-word description and chapter outline including topic keywords.
  • Authors must indicate which part of the book your chapter will address: Part 1: The Research Process, Part 2: Social Research Methods for Information Professionals, or Part 3: Managing a Research Project.
  • Authors will include one or two summary sentences that make explicit the chapter’s major themes, ideas, and learning outcomes.
  • Do not use any identifying information in your proposal (e.g., do not include author names or institution names in the Word doc).
  • Citations should follow the Endnotes-Bibliography format in the Chicago Manual of Style (17th edition).

Proposals are due by Friday, April 13, 2018 at 11:59PM PST and must be submitted via online form: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/libresearcherbook

  • Contributors will be notified of their status (acceptance or rejection) within 6–8 weeks of the due date of proposals.
  • The first draft of chapters will be due in August 2018.
  • Estimated length of chapter: 2,500–4,000 words.
  • Projected publication date: Summer 2019.

Should you need to contact the editors, use the following email address: libresearcherbook@gmail.com. Bookmark the Google site: https://sites.google.com/view/libraryresearcherbook/home.

Thank you,
Lee Ann Fullington (Health Sciences Librarian, Brooklyn College/CUNY)
Brandon K. West (Head of Research Instruction Services, SUNY Geneseo)
Frans Albarillo (Social Sciences Librarian, Brooklyn College/CUNY)

Call for Proposals: Academic Library Impact Research Grants

This is limited to ACRL members.

Call for Proposals 2018

In 2018 the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has allocated $20,000 to offer grants of up to $3,000 each for librarians to carry out new research in areas suggested by ACRL’s 2017 report Academic Library Impact: Improving Practice and Essential Areas to Research (prepared for ACRL by OCLC Research and available for download or purchase). This program is one of several developed by ACRL’s Value of Academic Libraries (VAL) Committee to support librarians in their efforts to demonstrate the impact of their work to a wider audience.

ACRL invites applications from librarians and information professionals seeking to conduct research that will demonstrate library contributions to student learning and success. The proposed project should aim to build on the foundations of the Academic Library Impact report and fill gaps in existing literature. The committee invites applicants to propose using any investigative methods appropriate to their research questions. These include but are not limited to standard quantitative and qualitative approaches, as well as critical evaluations, case studies, reflective essays, and (auto)ethnography. Proposals that involve collaboration between librarians and other higher education stakeholders, such as institutional researchers, faculty, administration, students, or community partners are also welcome.

Applications are due by 5pm Central Time on April 1, 2018. All applicants will be notified of their status by Friday, May 31, 2018. Grants funds will be disbursed within one month following completion of an agreement form.

It is anticipated that future calls for proposals will be issued in the coming years.

Eligibility

Each applicant must be a member of ACRL and employed as a librarian or information professional in a university, college, community college, or research library at the time of application for the grant.

Grants should not be sought for tuition or other degree-related expenses.

Application Instructions

The application coversheet is available to download here. Please fill it out, save it, and combine it into a single PDF with the other documents detailed below.

The application should be submitted by the principal investigator or project lead. It should include:

1) A completed cover sheet (use application form provided) with your name, contact information, ACRL membership information, and, if applicable, names and contact details of collaborators.

2) Your CV or résumé.

3) A brief abstract of the project (maximum 200 words).

4) Proposed budgetusing the worksheet provided (download .docx file). The budget should total no more than $3,000, unless additional funding has been secured. The budget should itemize costs related to carrying out the proposed research. Possible budget items include: wages for personnel, travel for work on the project, research tools and materials, technology services, and dissemination costs.

a. Indicate whether you have applied for or received any other funding for this project. No additional financial commitments by the institution are required, but they will be weighed in the evaluation of the proposal.
b. Institutional overhead is not an acceptable budget item, nor should it be listed as institutional support.
c. Any costs related to dissemination that are part of the budget should comprise no more than 20% of the total.

5) A project proposal (maximum 1000 words), following the guidelines outlined below.

Proposal Requirements

The proposal should include:

1) Statement of the research objectives and question(s): These should align with at least one of the six priority areas identified in the Academic Library Impact report. Critical perspectives will also be considered.

2) Methodology and analysis strategy for answering the question(s): Identify the methods that will be used, why they are appropriate for addressing the research question(s), and how the results will be assessed.

a. Explain any ethical considerations including how you will protect the rights of participants in your research, if applicable. If your research may be subject to an IRB, address that process here.

3) Planned research activities: This section should contain a detailed description of how the research project will be organized and implemented, including a timeline of activities. These activities should relate to the stated budget. It is expected that the project should be completed within 12 months, though dissemination of results may take longer.

a. If the proposed research constitutes a piece of a larger project, please address how the work funded by this grant fits in and what results will be achieved within the time allotted.
b. For collaborative projects, state how each team member will contribute. Team members may come from different institutions.

4) Expected outcomes and plans for dissemination: This section should describe plans for sharing the results of the project. Grant recipients are required to disseminate their research outputs in a form of their choosing. We strongly encourage that the chosen avenue of dissemination be open access and that it reach a wide audience of stakeholders within higher education.

a. Possibilities include: a conference presentation, a peer-reviewed article, a book or book chapter, a webinar, or a digital project.
b. The ACRL VAL committee will be assembling a special issue of College & Research Libraries and facilitating special sessions at the ACRL 2019 conference for grant recipients. They will invite all interested recipients to submit to those two venues. ACRL also has other avenues for publication that we would be happy to discuss.
c. In any publication or presentation of results, the grantee should acknowledge that support for the project came from ACRL.

5) Benefit of this research: Articulate the significance of this research project in advancing the role of academic libraries within your institution and the wider higher education landscape.

Application Submission

The deadline for receipt of completed applications is 5 p.m. Central Time on April 1, 2018.

Electronic submissions are required. Email a single PDF file of all required documents to Sara Goek, sgoek@ala.org.

Applicants will receive notice of the status of their research grant applications by May 31, 2018 and funds will be disbursed to recipients’ institutions within one month following completion of an agreement form.

Criteria

A subcommittee of members from the VAL Committee will review proposals. In selecting recipients, they will have the following criteria in mind and will seek balance across research questions and institutions.

  • Need for support: Is this monetary support necessary for this research to be undertaken? Is the proposed research original enough to justify funding?
  • Need for research: Will this research help fill an existing gap in the literature? Does it investigate or provide new ways of thinking about the impact of academic libraries? Are the ideas well-conceived, developed, and articulated?
  • Project design: Is the proposed project clear and intriguing? Will the proposed methodology enable effective research? Is it feasible within the proposed timeframe and budget? Are the proposed outcomes realistic?
  • Alignment with objectives: How well does the proposed project align with the priority areas suggested in the Academic Library Impact Report? Or, if this research takes a critical perspective, does the proposal explain how it will further debate in the field and deepen our understanding? How well does it align with the Value of Academic Library goals and objectives as stated in ACRL’s strategic plan?

Obligations

Researchers should expect to provide evidence of the progress and outcomes of their work. Grant recipients must:

  1. Complete and sign an agreement form for funds to be disbursed.
  2. Report on the progress of their research six months into the project.
  3. Disseminate their results within one year of completion.
  4. Provide ACRL with a summary of the research results that may be disseminated online, for example as part of a blog post or other update to the community.
  5. Acknowledge ACRL’s support in any publication or presentation resulting from this research.

Further Information

Resources on designing and conducting research are available on ALA’s LARKS webpage.

See the application frequently asked questions for more details on this program.

If your questions are not answered on the website, please contact ACRL Program Manager and Mellon/ACLS Public Fellow Sara Goek at: sgoek@ala.org or 312-280-5841.

CFP: Book Chapters in Library Assessment

This proposal doesn’t specifically mention archives. Considering that many (most?) academic libraries have or are connected to special collections and archives departments/libraries, this is a good opportunity to infiltrate a library publication.

Call for Book Chapter Proposals in Library Assessment

We are seeking chapter proposals for a book on library assessment. Please consider sharing your work in this area to this effort.

Working Title – Academic Libraries and the Academy: Strategies and Approaches to Demonstrate Your Value, Impact, and Return on Investment

Publisher

This book will be published under the auspices of ACRL (Association of College & Research Libraries). The anticipated publication date is early 2018.

Introduction

Assessment in academic libraries will play an increasingly crucial role in higher education. With the demand for greater transparency and accountability in funding for institutions, diminished budgets, and a shift to performance-based funding, academic libraries are examining and implementing new and creative approaches to demonstrate their inherent, immediate and long term value and impact to their institutions and stakeholders. Academic libraries of all shapes and sizes are understanding the need to establish their place and role in supporting institutional goals and objectives particularly related to student learning outcomes, academic student success measures, and faculty teaching and research productivity. To this end, many academic libraries are investing in efforts focused on implementing assessment initiatives that demonstrate their value and impact to their institutional stakeholders and community.

Objective

This book will present cases of how academic libraries are successfully implementing initiatives to demonstrate their worth and value to their institutional and community stakeholders. The cases will include proven strategies, lessons learned, effective approaches and practical applications successfully employed by academic staff and support professionals. The publication is intended to inform those at all levels of experience and stages of implementation— that is, those who are considering or just beginning to embark on this path, as well as others who have already taken the plunge and are looking to leverage or triangulate other strategies.

Target Audience

This publication will primarily target librarians, professional staff and administrators at all types of academic libraries, and we anticipate it will also be of interest to others across disciplines and industries who are engaged in similar assessment initiatives. It will present practical, easy-to-adopt strategies and approaches based on case studies, and will offer a breadth and depth of options to appeal to a wide range of readers at various stages of experience with demonstrating library value — from beginners to experts.

Proposed Book Sections

This book will be structured in four sections of case studies as described below:

Section 1: Seeding the Initiative. Explores the planning stages or “works-in-progress” in assessment that relate to the library’s impact and value. The results of these efforts may not be imminent. Nevertheless, these case studies demonstrate the potential value and the importance of the initial design and planning stage.

Section 2: Low-Hanging Fruit.  Provides stories of assessments that are easy to measure, short-term (less than one year), low cost, require few resources (staff or tools), and are easily replicable at similar academic libraries.

Example: ROI spreadsheets at the University of West Florida

Section 3: Reachable Fruit (with some effort).  Provides stories of assessments that may require more external and internal resources to measure, may take more than six months to one year to collect and analyze, feature medium costs and resources (i.e., incentives, equipment, tools), and may be replicable at other academic libraries that are similar in size or scope.

Example: Contingent valuation measures

Section 4: Hard-to-Reach Fruit. A range of assessment activities more difficult to measure and time and resource intensive, may require long-term data collection (e.g. longitudinal studies that require more than a year to collect a dataset or have measures that require more time, such as measuring a cohort’s graduation rates), and feature greater external partnerships, internal infrastructure, and/or additional resources to measure and analyze.

Examples: The Library Cube (which required the creation of a relational database), and Mixed-method Ethnographies, such as the ERIAL Project. (Ethnographic qualitative studies require more time to transcribe and analyze.)

Chapter proposals should focus on a topic that is related to one of the four sections listed above. Authors are also welcome to propose additional topics or sections that may be relevant to this publication.

Submission Procedure

Authors are invited to submit a chapter proposal as an email attachment in Word or PDF to academiclibrariesandtheacademy@gmail.com on or before Monday, January 09, 2017. The chapter proposal should be 300-500 words clearly explaining the intent and details of the proposed chapter as it relates to one of the four sections of the book described above. Authors will be notified by Monday, February 27, 2017 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Completed chapters are expected to be between 3,000-5,000 words, although shorter or longer chapters are negotiable. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by Tuesday, May 29, 2017.

Proposals should include:

  • Author name(s), institutional or organizational affiliation, job title/role
  • Brief author(s) bio
  • Proposed chapter title
  • A summary of the proposed chapter (300-500 words)

Proposed chapters should be based on unpublished work, unique to this publication and not submitted or intended to be simultaneously submitted elsewhere.

Important Dates

Book Chapter Proposals Submission Due: Monday, January 09, 2017
Authors notified: Monday, February 27, 2017
Abstracts/Full Chapters Due: Tuesday, May 29, 2017
Feedback and revisions to Authors: Summer, 2017
Final Revised Chapter Due: September, 2017
Copy-editing, production: Fall, 2017
Publication Date: Early 2018

Inquiries to: academiclibrariesandtheacademy@gmail.com

Editors

Marwin Britto, Ph.D., MLIS
University of Saskatchewan
Canada

Kirsten Kinsley, Ed.S., MLIS
Florida State University
USA

New Book: Critical Library Pedagogy

ACRL published a two-volume set, Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook. While it is library-focused, there are some chapters written by archivists. Although I have not read it, I expect some of the library instruction techniques can be applied to archival instruction.

Critical pedagogy incorporates inclusive and reflective teaching for aims of social justice; it provides mechanisms for students to evaluate their social, political, and economic standing, and to question societal norms and how these norms perpetuate societal injustices. Teaching librarians have long incorporated social justice into their work, but focused interest in critical library pedagogy has grown rapidly in recent years.

In two volumes, the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook works to make critical pedagogy more accessible for library educators, examining both theory and practice to help the busy practitioner explore various aspects of teaching for social justice.

Volume One, Essays and Workbook Activities, provides short essays reflecting on personal practice, describing projects, and exploring major ideas to provide inspiration as you begin or renew your exploration of critical pedagogy. The bibliography of each chapter provides a network of other sources to explore, and the volume closes with a selection of workbook activities to improve on your own practice and understanding of critical pedagogy.

Volume Two, Lesson Plans, provides plans covering everything from small activities to multi-session projects. Critical pedagogy requires collaborating with learners and adapting to their needs, as well as continual reflection, but these lessons provide elements you can pull and tweak to fit your own environment. These chapters also provide 30 different views on creating and delivering critically designed information literacy instruction and reflect material commonly requested by faculty—including introductions to databases, evaluating information sources, and the research cycle.

These two volumes provide a collection of ideas, best practices, and plans that contribute to the richness of what it means to do this type of work in libraries. The Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook will help you build personal teaching skills and identity, cultivate local community, and document your journey as a critical practitioner.


Table of Contents

VOLUME 1

 

Foreword
James Elmborg

Acknowledgments

Introduction
Nicole Pagowsky and Kelly McElroy

Chapter 1. Falling out of Praxis: Reflection as a Pedagogical Habit of Mind
Heidi LM Jacobs

Chapter 2. Learning from Teaching: A Dialogue of Risk and Reflection
Anne Jumonville Graf

Chapter 3. How Unplanned Events Can Sharpen the Critical Focus in Information Literacy Instruction
Ian Beilin

Chapter 4. “Taking Back” Information Literacy: Time and the One-Shot in the Neoliberal University
Karen P. Nicholson

Chapter 5. At Odds with Assessment: Being a Critical Educator within the Academy
Carolyn Caffrey Gardner and Rebecca Halpern

Chapter 6. What Standards Do and What They Don’t
Emily Drabinski and Meghan Sitar

Chapter 7. Barriers to Critical Pedagogy in Information Literacy Teaching
Gr Keer

Chapter 8. Loading Examples to Further Human Rights Education
Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe

Chapter 9. Social Constructivism and Critical Information Literacy
Jessica Critten and Andrea G. Stanfield

Chapter 10. Finding and Analyzing Information for Action and Reflection: Possibilities and Limitations of Popular Education in One-Shot Library Instruction
Kenny Garcia

Chapter 11. Collaborative Pedagogies: LIS Courses and Public Library Partnerships
Jessica Hochman

Chapter 12. What Is Possible: Setting the Stage for Co-Exploration in Archives and Special Collections
Patrick Williams

Chapter 13. Of the People, by the People, for the People: Critical Pedagogy and Government Information
Melanie Maksin

Chapter 14. The Failed Pedagogy of Punishment: Moving Discussions of Plagiarism beyond Detection and Discipline
Kevin P. Seeber

Chapter 15. Queering Library Instruction for Composition: Embracing the Failure
Ashley P. Ireland

Chapter 16. Search and Destroy: Punk Rock Tactics for Library Instruction
Caitlin Shanley and Laura Chance

Chapter 17. Cultivating a Mind of One’s Own: Drawing on Critical Information Literacy and Liberal Education
Elizabeth Galoozis and Caro Pinto

Chapter 18. Reflections on the Retention Narrative: Extending Critical Pedagogy beyond the Classroom
Alison Hicks and Caroline Sinkinson

Chapter 19. We Don’t Count: The Invisibility of Teaching Librarians in Statistics on Academic Instructional Labor
Aliqae Geraci

Chapter 20. Leave Your “Expert” Hat at the Door: Embracing Critical Pedagogy to Create a Community of Librarian Learners
Marisol Ramos, Dawn Cadogan, Sharon Giovenale, Kathleen R. Labadorf, and Jennifer Snow

Chapter 21. Starting Small: Practicing Critical Pedagogy through Collective Conversation
Megan Watson and Dave Ellenwood

Chapter 22. Developing a “Critical Pedagogy Disposition”
Donna Witek

Chapter 23. Resistance Is Fertile: (Or Everything I Know about Teaching I Learned in Yoga Class)
Robert Schroeder

Chapter 24. Using Personal Reflection to Incorporate Antiracist Pedagogy in Library Instruction
Melissa Kalpin Prescott

Chapter 25. Critical Self-Reflection: Moving Inward to Provide Outward Service
Xan Goodman

Chapter 26. Carrots in the Brownies: Incorporating Critical Librarianship in Unlikely Places
Maura Seale

Chapter 27. Fresh Techniques: Getting Ready to Use Hip Hop in the Classroom
Danielle Rowland

Chapter 28. Course Materials: Reinforcing Dominant Narratives or Challenging Mindsets
Elizabeth Mens

Chapter 29. Information Worlds and You: Harnessing Theory for Instruction
Julia Skinner

Chapter 30. Documenting Your Critical Journey
Nicole A. Cooke

About the Authors

VOLUME 2

Table of Contents

Foreword
Safiya Umoja Noble

Acknowledgments

Introduction
Nicole Pagowsky and Kelly McElroy

Chapter 1. Mapping Power and Privilege in Scholarly Conversations
Lauren Wallis

Chapter 2. Moving Students to the Center through Collaborative Documents in the Classroom
Maura A. Smale and Stephen Francoeur

Chapter 3. Deconstructing Gender in Financial Literacy
Fobazi M. Ettarh

Chapter 4. Question Authority and Be an Authority: The Future Belongs to Us
Romel Espinel

Chapter 5. Podcasting as Pedagogy
Nora Almeida

Chapter 6. Speaking Up: Using Feminist Pedagogy to Raise Critical Questions in the Information Literacy Classroom
Sharon Ladenson

Chapter 7. Authority and Source Evaluation in the Critical Library Classroom
Eamon Tewell and Katelyn Angell

Chapter 8. Critical Pedagogy and the Information Cycle: A Practical Application
Gina Schlesselman-Tarango and Frances Suderman

Chapter 9. Critical Engagement with Numbers and Images
Christine Photinos

Chapter 10. Critical Consciousness and Search: An Introductory Visualization
Sarah Polkinghorne

Chapter 11. Googling Google: Search Engines as Market Actors in Library Instruction
Jacob Berg

Chapter 12. Zines as Primary Sources
Kelly Wooten

Chapter 13. Teaching with Riot Grrrl: An Active Learning Session at the Intersections of Authenticity and Social Justice
Amy Gilgan

Chapter 14. Using Pop Culture, Feminist Pedagogy, and Current Events to Help Students Explore Multiple Sides of an Argument
Dory Cochran

Chapter 15. Zines in the Classroom: Critical Librarianship and Participatory Collections
Robin Potter and Alycia Sellie

Chapter 16. Where Should These Books Go?
Haruko Yamauchi

Chapter 17. Questioning Health Sciences Authority
Xan Goodman

Chapter 18. Critical Pedagogy for Business and Management Undergraduates: Evaluation of Marketing Information
Ilana Stonebraker, Caitlan Maxwell, and Jessica Jerrit

Chapter 19. Teaching with Data: Visualization and Information as a Critical Process
Andrew Battista and Jill Conte

Chapter 20. From Traditional to Critical: Highlighting Issues of Injustice and Discrimination through Primary Sources
Alan Carbery and Sean Leahy

Chapter 21. My Primary Sources: Using Student Personal History as a Gateway to Historical Context
Margaret Browndorf

Chapter 22. Historical Newspapers and Critical Thinking: A Lesson Plan
Gina Levitan

Chapter 23. Thinking through Visualizations: Critical Data Literacy Using Remittances
Erin Pappas, Celia Emmelhainz, and Maura Seale

Chapter 24. Critically Reflective Final Exercise
Angela Pashia

Chapter 25. Fresh Techniques: Hip Hop and Library Research
Dave Ellenwood and Alyssa Berger

Chapter 26. Social Justify Your Lesson Plan: How to Use Social Media to Make Pop Culture Scholarly
Lydia Willoughby and Kelly Blanchat

Chapter 27. Zotero: A Tool for Constructionist Learning in Critical Information Literacy
Joshua F. Beatty

Chapter 28. Ten-Minute Brainstorm in a First-Year English One-Off
Jenna Freedman

Chapter 29. How to Get to the Library from Here, There, and Everywhere!
Jolanda-Pieta (Joey) van Arnhem

Chapter 30. Incorporating Critically Conscious Assessment into a Large-Scale Information Literacy Program
Rachel Gammons