New Book Series: The Routledge Studies in Archives

The Routledge Studies in Archives series publishes new and cutting-edge research in records and archives studies. Recognising the imperative for record-keeping work in support of memory, social justice, technical systems, legal rights and historical understanding, this series extends the disciplinary boundaries of archival studies. It sees the archival in personal, economic and political activity, historically and digitally situated cultures, subcultures and movements, technological and infrastructural developments and in many other places.

Routledge Studies in Archives brings scholarship from diverse academic and cultural traditions into conversation and presents the work of emerging and established scholars, side by side. It promotes the exploration of the intellectual history of archival science, the internationalisation of archival discourse and the building of new archival theory.

The Series Editor invites proposals for books that offer original thinking about archives and records. If you have an idea for a book that you think would be appropriate for the series, then please contact the Series Editor, James Lowry (jlowry@liverpool.ac.uk), to discuss further.

CFP: IFLA Journal special issue on Information Literacy

IFLA Journal and IFLA’s Library Theory and Research (LTR)and Information Literacy (IL) Sections are pleased to announce a call for papers for a special issue focused on theory and practice in information literacy.  With the potential to transform lives and societies, the importance of information literacy is appreciated world-wide. Our understandings of information literacy come from across the globe and ranges in focus from practice-based to highly theoretical; from everyday life to education and workplace settings; and for infants through to the elderly.

Guest Editors:

Dr. Gaby Haddow
Libraries, Archives, Records & Information Science
School of Media, Creative Arts & Social Inquiry
Curtin University
Australia

Dr. Min Chou
Congressman Frank J. Guarini Library
New Jersey City University
United States

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • building new theory in information literacy;
  • the challenges of applying theory in practice;
  • the technology dimension in theoretical frameworks;
  • how learning theories can inform practice; and
  • cultural perspectives associated with learning.

Submission Deadline:

Articles for the special issue should be submitted to IFLA Journal for peer review before 30 June 2019.

How to Submit a Manuscript

IFLA Journal is hosted on ScholarOne™ Manuscripts, a web based online submission and peer review system SAGE Track. Please read the Manuscript Submission guidelines, and then simply visit the IFLA Journal Manuscript submission webpage to login and submit your article online.

IMPORTANT: Please check whether you already have an account in the system before trying to create a new one. If you have reviewed or authored for the journal in the past year it is possible that you will have had an account created.

All papers must be submitted via the online system. If you would like to discuss your paper prior to submission, please contact Steven Witt, Editor of IFLA Journal; or guest editors Gaby Haddow and Min Chou.

For instructions on formatting your manuscript please consult the submission guidelines.

About IFLA Journal

IFLA Journal is an international journal publishing peer reviewed articles on library and information services and the social, political and economic issues that impact access to information through libraries. The Journal publishes research, case studies and essays that reflect the broad spectrum of the profession internationally. All articles are subject to peer review. Articles are published in English. Abstracts will be translated by IFLA (the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions) into the other working languages of IFLA—Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Russian or Spanish—for publication.

IFLA Journal is published by Sage Publications and is the official journal of IFLA, and has an international readership consisting of academic institutions, professional organizations, and IFLA members who all receive a free subscription to the journal.

Each issue of IFLA Journal is made available Open Access upon publication on IFLA’s website.  Authors are also encouraged to make the accepted version of their manuscripts available in their personal or institutional repositories.

IFLA Journal is indexed by the following databases:

  • Abi/inform
  • Academic Search Premier
  • Business Source Corporate
  • Compendex
  • Current Awareness Abstracts
  • IBZ: International Bibliography of Periodical Literature
  • IBZ: International Bibliography of Periodical Literature in the Humanities and Social Sciences
  • Information Science and Technology Abstracts
  • Inspec
  • Library Information Science Abstracts
  • Library Literature & Information Science
  • SciVal
  • Scopus
  • Sociological Abstracts
  • Web of Science

Call for papers: GKMC special issue on Community and small archives

Call for papers: GKMC special issue on Community and small archives. Submission deadline: 15 February 2019.

This is a call for papers on community and small archives for a special issue of Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication

Recently there has been noticeable growth in discussion around community and small archives. Such archives may be stand-alone or part of other organisations such as schools, universities, historic societies, churches, cultural or indigenous communities, and local government or quasi-government organisations. They are often the result of local or community initiatives (where community does not necessarily have a geographic meaning). The notion of critical archiving and giving voice to the marginalised and non-elites is another important aspect, and community archives are considered to challenge the dominant modes of archival practice. Yet the realities of day-to-day practice in small archives are not widely understood or acknowledged by the mainstream or formal archive sector, and it can be difficult to identify key themes or concerns for community and small archives.

Papers are requested that explore the nature and use of community and small archives, their collections and management, and their place in the wider cultural heritage industries. Practitioner perspectives and case studies are especially encouraged.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:
* Community archives and digital heritage
* The management of community and small archives including the use of volunteers, access, funding, governance, and strategy
* Diversity and discrimination vs the neutrality of the archives
* Social justice and community archives
* The nature and diversity of collections in community archives including digital collections and the issues around digital preservation and/or digitisation
* The use of community archives in digital humanities and local history
* Training and professional development for community archivists and archives staff
* Case studies and practitioner perspectives on the role, purpose, and place of community archives
* Cross-sectoral and shared practice around small and community archives or collections
* The place of community archives in the wider archival environment
* The place of community archives in the cultural heritage industries

Submission deadline: 15 February 2019

Guest Editors:
Sarah Welland
Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
sarah.welland@openpolytechnic.ac.nz

Dr Amanda Cossham
Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
amanda.cossham@openpolytechnic.ac.nz

Further information can be found here: Community and small archives: evaluating, preserving, accessing, and engaging with community-based archival heritage http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/call_for_papers.htm?id=8127

Call for Case Studies: Native American Archivists Section

In August 2018, the SAA Council issued a statement endorsing the Protocols for Native American Archival Materials as an external standard of the organization.  The Protocols establish best practices for the culturally responsive care and use of Native American archival materials, particularly materials that are housed in non-tribal institutions.

This series of case studies, sponsored by the Native American Archivists Section (NAAS) of SAA, is intended to help archivists, librarians, museum curators, and other professionals who work with Native American archival materials see how the Protocols can be adapted for use in a variety of institutional contexts.  More broadly, the case studies series is designed to highlight evolving access policies to Native American materials, whether or not these policies are based specifically on the Protocols.

Elements of a Case Study:

Case studies are intended to demonstrate real-world examples of the ways in which contributors and their institutions have developed and/or implemented access policies for culturally sensitive Native American archival materials.  Contributors are encouraged to write about the challenges of developing and implementing these access policies in their institutional contexts, as well as their successes.  Case studies from all sizes and types of institutions are welcomed, as are case studies focusing on various types of culturally sensitive archival materials (textual, photographic, audio/visual, etc.).  Case studies contributed by single authors or multiple authors are also welcome.

Each case study should include the following basic elements:

  • An introduction, which describes the institutional context and relevant Native American archival materials
  • narrative, which describes the development and/or implementation of access policies to those materials and any challenges or barriers encountered
  • conclusion, which describes lessons learned and ongoing development and/or modification of the access policies

A key component of best practices for the care and use of culturally sensitive Native American archival materials is collaboration with Native American communities.  Case studies that reflect Native American communities’ experiences with institutions’ evolving access policies are also encouraged.

Preparing and Submitting Your Case Study:

To inquire about submitting a case study, please contact the series editors: Rose Buchanan, NAAS Steering Committee Member rose.buchanan@nara.gov], and Caitlin Haynes, NAAS Vice Chair [haynesce@si.edu]. Submissions are needed for summer-fall 2019, and will be posted to the SAA Case Study Series website on a rolling basis.

Case studies should be between 1,500 and 5,000 words.  Authors are responsible for understanding and following the principles that govern the “fair use” of quotations and illustrations, and for obtaining written permission to publish where necessary.  Accuracy in citations is also the author’s responsibility.  SAA prefers the current edition of the Chicago Manual of Style with endnote formatting for citations.

Review Process:

All submissions will be reviewed by two volunteer reviewers from the NAAS Steering Committee or from the NAAS membership.  Submissions will be evaluated according to a rubric.  Reviewers will return the case study and completed rubric within three weeks of receipt to the series editors.  The series editors will review the feedback and make an editorial decision, consulting with the NAAS Steering Committee and SAA Publications Editor as necessary.  The series editors will communicate a publication decision to the author(s) within five weeks of the receipt of the submission.

  • For rejected case studies: The series editors will communicate the rejection to the author(s) and provide the reasons for this editorial decision.
  • For a recommendation of revise and resubmit: The series editors will communicate the decision to the author(s) and negotiate a reasonable window of time for resubmission.
    • Resubmitted case studies will be reviewed by the series editors and at least one of the original reviewers to ensure that recommended changes have been satisfactorily incorporated.  The series editors, in consultation with the NAAS Steering Committee, ultimately make the decision to publish or reject resubmitted case studies.  The series editors will communicate that decision to the author(s).
  • For case studies accepted for publication: The series editors will communicate the acceptance to the author(s).

A submission will not be considered if it is being reviewed by another publishing outlet at the same time, or if it has been published previously in a similar form.

Publication Process:

Once accepted, case studies will be submitted to the SAA Publications Editor and Director of Publishing for light copyediting.  If major changes are needed, a version tracking those changes will be sent to the author for confirmation.  After the author signs off on a final version, SAA will format the case study and post it to the Case Study Series website as a PDF.

Copyright in the case study will remain with the author, and SAA will acknowledge this in the copyright line that appears with the case study.  Authors will consent, grant, and assign to SAA the non-exclusive right to publish and/or distribute all or any part of the case study throughout the world in electronic or any other medium.  In return, SAA agrees to publish the work under a Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives license.

Call for Authors: Book on University History and Culture

Primary Research Group (www.PrimaryResearch.com), publisher of research
reports about libraries and higher education, is seeking to contract an author
to write a monograph on the academic library role in identifying, preserving,
archiving, accessing and marketing one’s own institution university history
and culture.  We define these terms broadly to include seminal lectures,
works, images, coursework, inventions, scholarship, special collections,
intellectual property, logos, performances, athletic events, student life and
other facets of the university experience.  The report requires 5 detailed
profiles of university or college efforts, focused primarily on the academic
library role but encompassing other departments or units as a replacement or
supplement to a university profile.  This is a compensated assignment.  To
apply send your resume and a brief cover letter to jmoses@primaryresearch.com.

CFP: Special Issue of The Journal of Popular Culture: Archives and Popular Culture

Guest Editors      

  • Rüstem Ertuğ Altınay, University of Vienna
  • Olivera Jokic, City University of New York

Description

This special issue explores the intricate relationship between archives and popular culture: how archives shape our understanding of “popular culture,” and how diverse forms of popular culture shape conceptions and contents of archives. Conventional conceptualizations of the archive as the repository of authoritative historical documents, assembled and maintained by institutions of the state, have increasingly been challenged. Formation of repositories, in public and private, of materials created by individuals who lack epistemic authority has been of interest not only to historians looking for traces of their lives. Especially through diverse forms of popular culture—from books, photography, video, and music to statues and garments—archives have taken on new lives to become part of public culture. In such cultural products, that which ostensibly belongs to history shapes how we understand the past, can experience the present, and imagine the future.

While both mainstream and unorthodox archives gain new lives in and through popular culture, they also challenge our contemporary conceptions of “popular culture” by revealing how the definitions of popular culture have changed, and how new genres of documentation have emerged and disappeared over time. With the profound transformation of the recording media and conceptions of literacy, these processes have reached an unprecedented speed. As more people have acquired access to recording, distribution, and preservation of written and visual texts with broad availability of high-speed Internet connections, the time difference between the moment of recording and the moment of historiography has shrunk beyond measure. The archive is still about the past, but the past may appear closer than ever to the present.

The questions we would like to explore include, but are not limited to:

  • What is the role of the archive in defining what is popular?
  • Can archives be classified as products of popular culture? When and how do some archives become popular?
  • What would an archive of popularity look like?
  • How do archives reproduce or challenge our conceptions of the popular?
  • How does popular culture produce unorthodox archives?
  • How do artifacts of popular culture use archives to create continuity or difference between the past and the present?
  • How do archives of the popular shape the desires and imaginations of the future?
  • How do minoritarian producers of popular culture use or re-define archives of oppression and dominance? What prospects and limitations are involved in such endeavors?
  • What are the affective politics of archival praxis, and how do they unravel in the context of popular culture?
  • What has been the effect of the digital and mobile technologies on the relationship between the archive and popular culture?

If you are interested in contributing to this special issue, please send a 300-word abstract to the editors, Rüstem Ertuğ Altınay (rea270@nyu.edu) and Olivera Jokic (ojokic@jjay.cuny.edu), by November 30, 2018. Authors will be notified in early December 2018 whether they should submit a full version of their article for peer review. Full-length articles of 5,000–7,500 words will be due by December 1, 2019. Please note that final decisions about publication will depend on the peer-review process.

Call for Chapter Proposals: Borders & belonging: Critical examinations of LIS approaches toward immigrants

This call does not specify archives and is geared towards libraries, but there may be potential crossover.

__________________________________

Call for Chapter Proposals:
Borders & belonging: Critical examinations of LIS approaches toward immigrants

Book Editor: Ana Ndumu
Publisher: Library Juice Press
Series: Critical Race Studies and Multiculturalism in LIS
Series Editors: Annie Pho and Rose L. Chou

Borders & belonging: Critical examinations of LIS approaches toward immigrants is a response to the need for discourse on how the LIS field, particularly in North America, is shaped by longstanding ideologies on nativity, race, ethnicity, language, class, and “belonging.” The goal is to probe concrete aspects of the LIS field (e.g., workforce, programs, facilities, resources, education and publications) and shed light on ethnocentric and essentialist frameworks. Here, an immigrant is defined as a person who permanently lives in but was born outside of the U.S. or Canada and respective territories. An immigrant is either a refugee, asylee, legal permanent resident, naturalized citizen or undocumented person. Please consult the editor about ideas involving international students.

Works should critically examine the role of immigration policy along with sociocultural paradigms in the library-immigrant relationship. Prospective authors are encouraged to refer to Mignolo & Walsh’s1 On Decoloniality: Concepts, Analytics, Praxis along with Caidi, Allard, and Quirke’s2 Information practices of immigrants to develop their contributions.

Below is a sample, not exhaustive, list of topics:
• libraries and the promotion of assimilation or westernization
• linkages between libraries and colonialism and/or imperialism
• the role of libraries and information in mass migration and globalization
• immigrant self-determination versus structural inequality
• immigrant pre-migration information behavior
• immigrant contributions to information innovations (e.g., Silicon Valley, H-1B visa)
• presumptions of immigrant information incompetence and/or digital divides
• libraries and model minority narratives
• libraries and liberation rhetoric in the immigrant context
• libraries in sanctuary cities/states
• libraries in immigration detention centers
• libraries, privacy and the USA PATRIOT Act
• library services to specific immigrant groups (i.e., DACA recipients, TPS holders, religious minorities, forcefully displaced groups)
• nativism, populism, or xenophobia in libraries
• historical aspects of library services to immigrants
• gaps in immigrant information behavior research
• immigrants in the LIS workforce

Invited authors will complete 3,000 to 6,000 word chapters. LIS affiliates (LIS professionals, paraprofessionals, students and faculty) in the U.S. and Canada are encouraged to propose chapters. Chapters may be conceptual or empirical, exploratory or explanatory. All research methods are welcome. Case studies and literature reviews must draw from both migration/population studies and LIS literature. No previously submitted or published material.

Submissions:
Please email a 300-500 word proposal to Ana Ndumu at andumu@umd.edu by December 15, 2018. Proposals should include:
• Anticipated title
• Chapter rationale
• Brief outline
• Author(s) bio(s)

About Library Juice Press:
Library Juice Press, an imprint of Litwin Books, LLC, specializes in theoretical and practical issues in librarianship from a critical perspective, for an audience of professional librarians and students of library science. Topics include library philosophy, information policy, library activism, and in general anything that can be placed under the rubric of “critical studies in librarianship.”

About the Series:
The Critical Race Studies and Multiculturalism in LIS series collects and publishes works from theoretical, practical and personal perspectives that critically engage issues of race, ethnicity, cultural diversity and equity in library and information science (LIS). Works published in this series include:
Pushing the Margins: Women of Color and Intersectionality in LIS, edited by Rose L. Chou and Annie Pho
Topographies of Whiteness: Mapping Whiteness in Library and Information Science, edited by Gina Schlesselman-Tarango
Teaching for Justice: Implementing Social Justice in the LIS Classroom, edited by Nicole A. Cooke and Miriam E. Sweeney

About the Editor:
Ana Ndumu is a researcher at the University of Maryland (UMD), College Park’s College of Information. She earned a Ph.D. in Information at Florida State University´s School of Information and explores the intersection of libraries, information and demography. She has completed studies on Black immigrants’ ICT device and Internet access; Black immigrants’ information behavior and experiences with information overload; the development of a scale for measuring and examining information overload as immigrant acculturative stress; and critical discourse analysis on LIS literature involving immigrants. Ana is a UMD President’s Postdoctoral Fellow and Digital Library Federation (DLF) Futures Fellow.

1. Mignolo, Walter, and Catherine E Walsh. On Decoloniality: Concepts, Analytics, and Praxis. Durham: Duke University Press, 2018.
2. Caidi, Nadia, Danielle Allard, and Lisa Quirke. “Information practices of immigrants.” Annual review of information science and technology 44, no. 1 (2010): 491-531.