Call for papers: Collect & Connect conference

Leiden (The Netherlands), 23-24 November 2020

We are pleased to announce a call for papers for the international conference Collect & Connect: Archives and Collections in a Digital Age. The conference will be held at Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden (depending on COVID-19 it could be moved online) on 23-24 November 2020.

The aims of this international conference which officially concludes the NWO/Brill Creative Industries Project Making Sense of Illustrated Handwritten Archives are two: to present results of finished and original research in the field of digitized archives and natural and cultural heritage collections, and to promote exchange and discussion between researchers and heritage professionals in the field of digital natural and cultural heritage.

Confirmed keynote speakers are:

Dr. Sharon Leon (Michigan State University)
Prof. Lambert Schomaker (University of Groningen)
Prof. Franco Niccolucci (PIN – University of Florence)

Paper formats & submission:

Regular papers with 10 to 12 pages (max. 12 pages, min. 10 pages) and short papers with 5 to 9 pages (max. 9 pages, min. 5 pages) need to be submitted through EasyChair.
All papers will be thoroughly peer-reviewed by at least two members of the conference’s program committee.

Important dates:

11 September 2020 (deadline for short and long papers)
2 October 2020 (notification of authors)
15 November 2020 (camera-ready papers)

Thematic scope of the conference:

In recent years, libraries, archives and museums have spent major efforts on annotating and enriching their digitized archives and collections with contextual information, in order to make them retrievable and interlinked in novel ways. Often institutions aim to enhance their reach and relevance for broader user groups. A major challenge in the field is the heterogeneous character of many of such digitized collections. Many handwritten archives and collections of physical objects in the realms of natural history, archaeology, history, and art history entail combinations of textual and visual elements whose interpretation requires a range of different expertises and computational technologies. This conference therefore welcomes papers that present, discuss, and reflect upon the technical, social, and institutional challenges digital heritage professionals and researchers encounter when enriching heterogeneous digitized collections with context.

Six to eight papers selected among those presented at the conference are expected to be selected for publication in the Journal of Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH). The authors of the selected papers will be asked to extend their conference papers to comply with the editorial standards of the Journal. They will be informed at the end of the Conference by the Selection Committee, formed by the Conference Chairs and JOCCH Editor-in-Chief, and will provided with a suitable deadline to prepare their papers for publication. Thus, to publish in this Special Issue it is necessary to present the paper at the International Conference Collect&Connect.

More information on guidelines and paper submission at:

https://sites.google.com/naturalis.nl/makingsenseproject/conference/cfp

CFP: Libraries: Culture, History, and Society

Type: Call for Papers
Date: August 27, 2020
Location: United States
Subject Fields: Graduate Studies, Humanities, Political History / Studies, Social History / Studies, Women’s & Gender History / Studies

Libraries: Culture, History, and Society (LCHS) is now accepting submissions for volume 5, number 1, to be published Spring 2021, and for subsequent issues to be published semiannually. A peer-reviewed publication of the Library History Round Table of the American Library Association and the Penn State University Press, LCHS is available in print and online via JSTOR and Project Muse.

The only journal in the United States devoted to library history, LCHS positions library history as its own field of scholarship, while bringing together scholars from many disciplines to examine the history of libraries as institutions, collections, and services, as well as the experiences of library employees and users. There are no limits of time period or geography, and libraries of every type are included (private, public, corporate, academic, and school libraries, and special collections). In addition to Library Science, the journal welcomes contributors from History, English, Literary Studies, Education, Sociology, Gender/Women’s Studies, Race/Ethnic Studies, Political Science, Architecture, and other disciplines.

Submissions for volume 5, issue 1, are due August 28th, 2020, and the deadline for volume 5, issue 2 will be in late February. Manuscripts must be submitted electronically through LCHS’s Editorial Manager system at https://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS . They must also conform to the instructions for authors at https://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS/account/LCHS%20Author%20Submission%20Guidelines.pdf. New scholars, and authors whose work is in the “idea” stage, are welcomed to contact the editors if they would like guidance prior to submission.

For further questions, please contact the editors:
Bernadette Lear, BAL19@psu.edu
Eric Novotny, ECN1@psu.edu

Contact Info:
Bernadette A. Lear
Co-Editor, LCHS
BAL19@psu.edu

Contact Email:
bal19@psu.edu

URL: http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html

 

CFP: Conference “Digital Humanities and Gender History”

Type: Call for Papers
Date: August 31, 2020
Subject Fields: Digital Humanities, Women’s & Gender History / Studies
**Deadline: August 31, 2020**

CfP Conference “Digital Humanities and Gender History”

Place: Online Conference

Dates: 5.2., 12.2., 19.2. and 26.2.2021, 4 – 8 p.m. CET

Languages: English, German

The Chair of Gender History at the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena (Germany), together with the Arbeitskreis Historische Frauen- und Geschlechterforschung e.V. and the Digital German Women’s Archive (Digitales Deutsches Frauenarchiv), is organising a virtual international conference on “Digital Humanities and Gender History” on the four Friday afternoons of February 2021.

The conference aims to address gender-historical aspects of the history of the digital and the digital humanities as well as the application of digital methods and research workflows for gender-historical questions. The conference will examine the gender-historical implications of digital methods, tools and projects as well as the possibilities and limitations, added values and challenges that digital methods offer for the study of gender history.

In addition to the presentation of current and completed projects, problem-centered lectures dealing with aspects of cross-cutting relevance for a digital gender history are particularly welcome. Proposals for topics can refer to the following thematic complexes:

  • Application of digital methods and tools in regards to gender history issues
  • Gender history of the digital humanities or digital sub-disciplines
  • Constructions of gender in or making it visible by digital methods (e.g. using data mining, network or GIS technologies, visualisations etc.)
  • Gendered or intersectional marking of digital models of reality, e.g. also artificial intelligence
  • Significance of gender in the modelling of digital humanities projects, the design and development of databases, algorithms, software, tools and digital working and virtual research environments
  • Digital archives and sources, their indexing and distribution
  • Digital forms of publication for gender history e.g. digital journals, blogs, project pages, social media etc.
  • Relationship between gender history and digital humanities or, possibly, considerations for a scientific disciplining of Digital Historical Gender Studies with specific questions, epistemes, methods and other (sub)disciplinary characteristics

Please submit your contribution, approximately one page in length, by 31 August to the e-mail address pia.sybille.marzell@uni-jena.de. We ask you to state whether your contribution will be a project presentation or whether you wish to focus on more comprehensive questions and aspects of digital gender history. Besides presentations with 20 minutes of speaking time, smaller lectures or alternative formats such as demos, tutorials, pecha kuchas etc. can also be proposed. Contributions from all epochs and regions are welcome.

The four conference afternoons in February form a unit, so participation in all four dates would be desirable. The conference languages are English and German. We are currently seeking funding to provide simultaneous translation of the conference in sign language as well as an English translation of the German contributions.

Contact Info:
Martin Prell (University of Jena)

Pia Marzell (University of Jena)

Contact Email: martin.prell@uni-jena.de

CFP: DLF Forum

The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) and the Digital Library Federation (DLF) are thrilled to announce our new CFP for our virtual DLF Forum this fall. We have a lot of exciting things planned and are excited to share the first steps with you.

First, we’ve made some adjustments to the dates on which we’ll hold our events this fall.

Full info about the new VIRTUAL DLF Forum CFP is here, but we can’t resist sharing some other details with you here:

  • Our guiding focus for this year’s Forum is building community while apart, chosen as a top priority by respondents to our recent DLF community surveyAs one step to this end, all of our 2020 events will be free of charge, and resources will be made widely available after our events. Later this summer we’ll share information about how to register for our events.
  • While we welcome proposals from anyone with interesting work to share, this year the planning committee will prioritize submissions from BIPOC people and people working at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and other BIPOC-centered libraries, archives, and museums, in alignment with our commitment to do more to ensure marginalized voices have better and more central representation.
  • Accepted presentations and panels will be delivered via pre-recorded video that will “go live” at specific times during the conference, and there will be some method for community discussion during “watch parties” as videos are posted.
  • Because of our virtual format and our emphasis on bringing our community together, we will be offering a greatly reduced number of sessions than we typically offer in our traditional in-person DLF Forum. To make space for as many voices as possible, individuals may present only once on the conference program. However, we will offer additional ways for community members to share content and resources whether conference proposals are accepted or not.

More information and full details about the new VIRTUAL DLF Forum CFP are here: https://forum2020.diglib.org/call-for-proposals

If you submitted a proposal to the original CFP, you should have received an email from us already about next steps. If you did not receive an email, reach out at forum@diglib.org.

The deadline to submit to the new Forum CFP is Monday, August 17, at 11:59pm Eastern Time.

If you have any questions, please write to us at forum@diglib.org.

Thanks,
Gayle for Team CLIR/DLF

P.S. Want to stay updated on all things #DLFforum? Subscribe to our Forum newsletter or follow us at @CLIRDLF on Twitter.

CFP: Public Services Quarterly

PUBLIC SERVICES QUARTERLY is always looking for quality submissions.

Public Services Quarterly covers a broad spectrum of public service issues in academic libraries, presenting practical strategies for implementing new initiatives and research-based insights into effective practices. The journal publishes research-based and theoretical articles as well as case studies that advance the understanding of public services, including reference and research assistance, information literacy instruction, access and delivery services, and other services to patrons. Articles may examine creative ways to use technology to assist students and faculty. Practice-based articles are thoroughly grounded in the literature and situate the work done in one library into the larger context.

Manuscript Submissions:  This journal uses ScholarOne Manuscripts to manage submissions and the peer-review process.
To view an online sample copy, go to: www.tandfonline.com/WPSQ

For more information, feel free to contact the editor, editorial board, or columns editors, listed here.

Sian Brannon <Sian.Brannon@unt.edu>

Call for Chapters: Teaching Critical Reading Skills: Strategies for Academic Librarians Published by ACRL Press

Have you created library instructional or outreach activities focused on student reading? If you have case studies, lesson plans, stories, or programmatic approaches aimed at developing active, engaged, mindful, and critical readers, we want to hear from you.

Focus of the Book:

Librarians engage with student reading in a variety of ways: We work with students as they learn to become part of their disciplinary communities and practice reading scholarly articles, interpreting historical information from archival materials, and drawing conclusions based on information from unfamiliar source types like government documents, patents, figures, data, or works of criticism. This book will offer strategies for librarians working across a range of disciplinary areas so they can engage students who need to learn how to read in order to work, understand, and create new knowledge in their field.

We also work with students as they become critical, engaged citizens. We interact with students as they learn to make sense of information in web-based environments where authorship is often uncertain, take active steps to triangulate the information they find, and make decisions based on social media sources where bias and filter bubbles are inherent. We also work with student readers who come from a variety of backgrounds (e.g., non-native English speakers) and who are at different stages in their academic journey (e.g., transfer students or graduate students). This book will offer strategies that take into account librarians’ unique instructional opportunities to encourage students who read in order to understand, empathize, and create change.

Potential Chapter Topics May Include But Are Not Limited To:

  • Critical Reading – Defined and Examples in Practice
  • Primary Source Literacy (i.e., Special Collections and Archives) and Critical Reading
  • Reading for different student audiences – examples could include expert vs. novice approaches, reading instruction for first-year students, transfer students, or graduate students’ reading practices
  • Programmatic Approaches to Reading Programs
  • Community College Librarians and Critical Reading
  • Reading Scholarly Articles
  • Reading Beyond Scholarly Articles
  • Reading Emotionally Difficult Material
  • Reading in the Disciplines (i.e., sciences, social sciences, humanities)
  • Reading for Non-native English Speakers
  • Strategies for comprehending data or health resources
  • Reading strategies for different source types (e.g., opinion pieces, government documents, books…)

Submission Procedure:

Please submit an initial chapter proposal description of up to 500 words and a tentative chapter title. As part of your proposal description, please include a brief description of the practical content you will include in your chapter (e.g., lesson plan, instructional activity, assignment, outreach plan, or model for creating a campus program). Please also include the author(s)’ names, titles, and institutional affiliations, along with a link to current CV (or copy relevant info from your CV, which may be abbreviated to focus on information relevant to your experiences either with instruction and outreach or relevant publishing history).

Please submit proposals to: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSepZQVtqxnLvjRZLdGvhiVIFnIL5JWQFSq79xx0vLQqXdkJCg/viewform?usp=sf_link

Proposals are due by October 1, 2020.** Authors will be notified of their status (accept or decline) by November 15, 2020. A first draft of approximately 2000-5000 words (excluding endnotes and bibliography) will be due on February 15, 2021, and after receiving editorial feedback, a final draft will be due on July 31, 2021. Chapters must not be previously published or simultaneously submitted elsewhere.

**Special note – we very much understand that these are extremely strange and difficult times. If you have an idea but aren’t sure what your schedule looks like for fall/winter, please still contact us to express interest and share your idea. We’ll see what we can figure out together.**

Anticipated book publication date will be early 2022. Chapter authors will be able to make their chapters open access by posting final copies of their chapter in their institutional repositories.

For additional information, contact:

Hannah Gascho Rempel, Professor and Science Librarian, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR  – Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu

Rachel Hamelers, Teaching and Learning Librarian, Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA – rachelhamelers@muhlenberg.edu

CFP: International Conference on Digital Humanities: “Digital Dialogues”

Type: Conference

Date: October 24, 2020 to October 25, 2020

Location: United Kingdom

Subject Fields: Digital Humanities, Humanities, Research and Methodology, Social Sciences, Race Studies

With the epidemic shaking the world and the research/teaching/learning being moved online, the field of Digital Humanities has received unprecedented attention of scholars and professionals. It has become vital to explore its theories, methods and practices and to clarify its multiple possibilities and challenges.

This conference will look at the interaction of humanities and digital technologies and the use of humanities-related digital resources in various fields. It will analyse the ways digital humanities transformed and keep transforming academic environment, local communities and global conversations and the innovative ways of sharing knowledge and teaching it introduced.

We invite proposals from various disciplines including IT, media and communication, design, history, political sciences, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, literature, linguistics, psychology, etc.

Papers are invited on topics related, but not limited, to:

  • practising digital humanities
  • teaching digital humanities
  • digital collections, data and research processes
  • digital humanities across class, race and gender
  • digital humanities as activism and artistic practice
  • digital humanities and cyberculture

Paper proposals up to 250 words and a brief biographical note should be sent by 10 August 2020 to digital.humanities@lcir.co.uk.

The Paper Proposal form could be downloaded from http://digital.humanities.lcir.co.uk/

Registration fee – 90 GBP

The conference will be held online. Papers presented at the conference will be published in a post-conference volume with an ISBN number.

Contact Info:

Dr Olena Lytovka, digital.humanities@lcir.co.uk
Contact Email: digital.humanities@lcir.co.uk
URL: http://digital.humanities.lcir.co.uk/

 

CFP: Library Diversity and Residency Studies

Type: Journal
Date: September 15, 2020
Location: United States
Subject Fields: Library and Information Science, Archival Science
Library Diversity and Residency Studies: Journal Call for Papers

We are pleased to announce a call for papers for the next issue of Library Diversity and Residency Studies (LDRS), an open access, peer-reviewed journal founded and published by a team of librarians and LIS faculty members. LDRS publishes articles that are engaged in the social justice project of increasing diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in the library profession and in LIS curricula.

Journal URL: https://librarydiversity.institute/ldrs/
Author Guidelines: https://librarydiversity.institute/ldrs/author-guidelines/
Link to submit papers: https://librarydiversity.institute/ldrs/submit/

Deadline for submissions to the next issue is: September 15, 2020

LDRS is committed to providing a platform for the publication of work that might otherwise be marginalized from dominant discourses. We welcome work from established authors in the field, and also encourage submissions from new authors. We will prioritize submissions from minoritized voices, including submissions that represent diverse perspectives. We are committed to working with authors during the submission and review process.

We publish high quality, peer-reviewed articles in a range of formats, with a focus on DEI issues and residency programs. While we are open to suggestions for new article types and formats, We expect proposals to include unique and substantial new content from the author and are open to suggestions for new article types and formats. Examples of material we would publish include:

  • articles about particular DEI programs in libraries, with an objective assessment of strengths and weaknesses, the specific impacts of these programs, and strategies by which these programs could be replicated elsewhere;
  • rigorous and original research that includes discussion of implications and an argument for action that makes a unique, significant contribution to the professional literature;
  • articles arguing for a particular approach, strategy or development in librarianship, with practical examples of how it might be achieved;
  • transformative works with additional explanatory or interpretive content. For example, a transcription of an interview or panel discussion, with a substantial introduction explaining the importance of the subject to librarianship and a discussion; and
  • best practices to aid in the retention of librarians from minoritized populations.

Open Access Policy

LDRS is an open access publication. We believe making works that engage with DEI topics freely accessible will support a greater exchange of knowledge and provide the best possibility for change. There are no Article Processing Charges or any other charges associated with publishing in LDRS.

Works are released under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Attribution-NonCommercial license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0), which provides unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Copyright remains with the authors of articles published in LDRS, with the journal retaining a permanent right to display articles in final accepted form. For further details, refer to the LDRS author guidelines (https://librarydiversity.institute/ldrs/author-guidelines/).

CFP: Journal of the Society of North Carolina Archivists

Call for Papers – Deadline – October 20, 2020

J-SNCA is a peer-reviewed journal that seeks to support the theoretical, practical, and scholarly aspects of the archival profession. The editorial board of J-SNCA invites members of the research and archival communities to submit articles for a general issue on archival topics to be published in the Winter of 2020/2021.

Focuses on archival methodology, metadata, collecting practices, outreach, and rethinking the goals of archival work in our current age, especially considering COVID-19 and the national conversation on efforts towards anti-racism are all welcome.

The deadline for article submission is October 1, 2020. All members of the archival community, including students and independent researchers, are welcome to submit articles. If you were slated to present at the cancelled 2020 Society of North Carolina Archivists conference you are particularly encouraged to submit a paper based on your presentation. Contributors need not be members of Society of North Carolina Archivists or live in the state of North Carolina. Article proposals are welcome and encouraged.

Submission guidelines can be found at http://www.ncarchivists.org/publications/journal-ofthesociety-of-north-carolina-archivists-j-snca/manuscript-submission-guidelines/

***Membership is not required for submissions or inclusion in the journal***

Best,
Kristen Merryman
Managing Editor, JSNCA

Call for papers in the Records Management Journal EXTENDED TO JULY 23, 2020

Records management in the Anthropocene:
pathways and challenges presented by climate change

RMJ Editor: Sarah R. Demb, Harvard University Archives
With Guest Co-editor: Eira Tansey, University of Cincinnati Libraries

The Records Management Journal (RMJ) invites submissions for a themed issue focused on the pathways and challenges of climate change. We welcome contributions about, but not limited to, the following themes:

  • climate change and its (potential) impact on records management policy, principles and main dimensions
  • records management actors, components and advanced tools in relation to climate change
  • risk management approaches, standards, methods and tools to address records management’s contribution to and mitigation of climate change
  • records and information assets value and valorization (records economics/infonomics)
  • records management’s increasing reliance on fragile infrastructures
  • legal liability, rights, ownership and ethics in the Anthropocene
  • professional responsibilities, roles and skills in the Anthropocene
  • rapid technological change/challenges in the Anthropocene, including dealing with consequences of related events or practices such as pandemics and fossil-fuel use
  • challenging aspects of climate and climate change outcomes on long-term (rather than permanent) preservation, including on emulation and migration models
  • climate change resilience maturity models and records: relevant initiatives and case studies.

We are interested in different disciplinary perspectives from researchers, academics and practitioners. Submissions can be viewpoints, critical reviews, research, case studies or conceptual/philosophical papers.

New Submission Deadlines

  • Extended abstracts July 23, 2020

Provisional

  • Abstracts accepted and authors notified no later than:  August 31, 2020
  • Full paper submitted: October 23, 2020
  • Review, revision and final acceptance: March 26, 2021

The RMJ applies article-level publication, so within approximately a month of final acceptance the article will be available online.

Submission Process

Extended abstracts should be a 500-word version of the Records Management Journal’s structured abstract, using the headings described in the author guidelines at: www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/….

Please note that shorter opinion pieces and practitioner case studies (3,000 words) may also be submitted for this themed issue. Your abstract submission should indicate the intended length of your piece.

Under the design/methodology/approach heading, please include the following as appropriate to the type of paper:

  • What is the approach to the topic if it is a theoretical or conceptual paper? Briefly outline existing knowledge and the value added by the paper compared to that.
  • What is the main research question and/or aim if it is a research paper? What is the research strategy and the main method(s) used?
  • If the paper is a case study outline, include its scope and nature, and the method of deriving conclusions.
  • If the paper is an opinion piece, outline its focus and key highlight points.

Please send your extended abstract to: sarah_demb@harvard.edu. The editors are also happy to receive informal enquiries before submissions of abstracts.

  • Papers will be reviewed using the Journal’s standard double-blind peer review process.