AIEF: Call for Researchers: Industry in One Series

The ARMA International Education Foundation is currently seeking up to six (3 US, 3CA) researchers to work with us on a freelance basis. Each paper will identify the state of information management within the industry, highlighting records management in a condensed report (25-30 pages) for each of the following initial industries to be addressed: energy, finance, and legal. A report is to be generated for each topic by a subject matter expert (SME) to provide distinct United States and Canadian perspectives. It is conceivable that a SME with expertise and extensive experience in both countries could conduct research for both reports in a specific industry. In this case, the researcher would be awarded two contracts: one for the United States project, and one for the Canadian project. The Foundation would like to see this research address, at a minimum, the following questions:

* For the purposes of this research, define the scope of this industry and its role in the general economy.
* What is the primary regulatory agency or oversight body that oversees the industry?
* What are the information management-related risks for the industry?
* What record categories are critical to this industry and central to its operations?
* What are the primary laws and regulations that effect information management?
* What operational considerations affect information management?
* What are industry best practices for information management?
* What is the future outlook for the industry?
* Are records managers present in the industry? If not, who manages and controls the records?

The report will be reviewed prior to publication. A Foundation liaison will be assigned to the project and be a resource with the subject matter expert through its duration.
Available Funding: $2,000.00 (USD) per topic, per country, paid in three installments ($500, $500, $1,000).

Contract Term: To be negotiated. Goal is 3-6 months from the date of signed contract.
Applications: Please send a resume with a cover letter detailing why you are the person for this project, relevant experience, and suggestions for the project as email attachments to: coordinator@armaedfoundation.org

Copyright: Copyright will be retained by the Foundation.

Deadline for Applications: February 9, 2018

The AIEF is a funding resource for research and scholarships in the field of records and information management. The primary funding source is derived from concerned individuals and organizations in the profession. The Foundation is a 501(c) 3 non-profit entity. Potential donors are invited to contact the foundation administration for additional information: coordinator@armaedfoundation.org or visit http://armaedfoundation.org for additional information about the organization.

Call for Chapter: Male Sex Work & Society

(reposted from the SAA Diverse Sexuality and Gender Discussion List)

Archival Research & Male Sex Work

Harrington Park Press is seeking a potential commissioned chapter author who might be interested in archival research in male sex work histories, culture, and lives.

This is for an upcoming Volume 2 companion volume to the 2014 work, Male Sex Work & Society.

Interested persons may send their CV and letter of interest to: <bcohen@harringtonparkpress>

William Cohen
Publisher & Editor-in-Chief
Harrington Park Press, LLC
New York NY

Call for Proposals: Academic Library Impact Research Grants

This is limited to ACRL members.

Call for Proposals 2018

In 2018 the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has allocated $20,000 to offer grants of up to $3,000 each for librarians to carry out new research in areas suggested by ACRL’s 2017 report Academic Library Impact: Improving Practice and Essential Areas to Research (prepared for ACRL by OCLC Research and available for download or purchase). This program is one of several developed by ACRL’s Value of Academic Libraries (VAL) Committee to support librarians in their efforts to demonstrate the impact of their work to a wider audience.

ACRL invites applications from librarians and information professionals seeking to conduct research that will demonstrate library contributions to student learning and success. The proposed project should aim to build on the foundations of the Academic Library Impact report and fill gaps in existing literature. The committee invites applicants to propose using any investigative methods appropriate to their research questions. These include but are not limited to standard quantitative and qualitative approaches, as well as critical evaluations, case studies, reflective essays, and (auto)ethnography. Proposals that involve collaboration between librarians and other higher education stakeholders, such as institutional researchers, faculty, administration, students, or community partners are also welcome.

Applications are due by 5pm Central Time on April 1, 2018. All applicants will be notified of their status by Friday, May 31, 2018. Grants funds will be disbursed within one month following completion of an agreement form.

It is anticipated that future calls for proposals will be issued in the coming years.

Eligibility

Each applicant must be a member of ACRL and employed as a librarian or information professional in a university, college, community college, or research library at the time of application for the grant.

Grants should not be sought for tuition or other degree-related expenses.

Application Instructions

The application coversheet is available to download here. Please fill it out, save it, and combine it into a single PDF with the other documents detailed below.

The application should be submitted by the principal investigator or project lead. It should include:

1) A completed cover sheet (use application form provided) with your name, contact information, ACRL membership information, and, if applicable, names and contact details of collaborators.

2) Your CV or résumé.

3) A brief abstract of the project (maximum 200 words).

4) Proposed budgetusing the worksheet provided (download .docx file). The budget should total no more than $3,000, unless additional funding has been secured. The budget should itemize costs related to carrying out the proposed research. Possible budget items include: wages for personnel, travel for work on the project, research tools and materials, technology services, and dissemination costs.

a. Indicate whether you have applied for or received any other funding for this project. No additional financial commitments by the institution are required, but they will be weighed in the evaluation of the proposal.
b. Institutional overhead is not an acceptable budget item, nor should it be listed as institutional support.
c. Any costs related to dissemination that are part of the budget should comprise no more than 20% of the total.

5) A project proposal (maximum 1000 words), following the guidelines outlined below.

Proposal Requirements

The proposal should include:

1) Statement of the research objectives and question(s): These should align with at least one of the six priority areas identified in the Academic Library Impact report. Critical perspectives will also be considered.

2) Methodology and analysis strategy for answering the question(s): Identify the methods that will be used, why they are appropriate for addressing the research question(s), and how the results will be assessed.

a. Explain any ethical considerations including how you will protect the rights of participants in your research, if applicable. If your research may be subject to an IRB, address that process here.

3) Planned research activities: This section should contain a detailed description of how the research project will be organized and implemented, including a timeline of activities. These activities should relate to the stated budget. It is expected that the project should be completed within 12 months, though dissemination of results may take longer.

a. If the proposed research constitutes a piece of a larger project, please address how the work funded by this grant fits in and what results will be achieved within the time allotted.
b. For collaborative projects, state how each team member will contribute. Team members may come from different institutions.

4) Expected outcomes and plans for dissemination: This section should describe plans for sharing the results of the project. Grant recipients are required to disseminate their research outputs in a form of their choosing. We strongly encourage that the chosen avenue of dissemination be open access and that it reach a wide audience of stakeholders within higher education.

a. Possibilities include: a conference presentation, a peer-reviewed article, a book or book chapter, a webinar, or a digital project.
b. The ACRL VAL committee will be assembling a special issue of College & Research Libraries and facilitating special sessions at the ACRL 2019 conference for grant recipients. They will invite all interested recipients to submit to those two venues. ACRL also has other avenues for publication that we would be happy to discuss.
c. In any publication or presentation of results, the grantee should acknowledge that support for the project came from ACRL.

5) Benefit of this research: Articulate the significance of this research project in advancing the role of academic libraries within your institution and the wider higher education landscape.

Application Submission

The deadline for receipt of completed applications is 5 p.m. Central Time on April 1, 2018.

Electronic submissions are required. Email a single PDF file of all required documents to Sara Goek, sgoek@ala.org.

Applicants will receive notice of the status of their research grant applications by May 31, 2018 and funds will be disbursed to recipients’ institutions within one month following completion of an agreement form.

Criteria

A subcommittee of members from the VAL Committee will review proposals. In selecting recipients, they will have the following criteria in mind and will seek balance across research questions and institutions.

  • Need for support: Is this monetary support necessary for this research to be undertaken? Is the proposed research original enough to justify funding?
  • Need for research: Will this research help fill an existing gap in the literature? Does it investigate or provide new ways of thinking about the impact of academic libraries? Are the ideas well-conceived, developed, and articulated?
  • Project design: Is the proposed project clear and intriguing? Will the proposed methodology enable effective research? Is it feasible within the proposed timeframe and budget? Are the proposed outcomes realistic?
  • Alignment with objectives: How well does the proposed project align with the priority areas suggested in the Academic Library Impact Report? Or, if this research takes a critical perspective, does the proposal explain how it will further debate in the field and deepen our understanding? How well does it align with the Value of Academic Library goals and objectives as stated in ACRL’s strategic plan?

Obligations

Researchers should expect to provide evidence of the progress and outcomes of their work. Grant recipients must:

  1. Complete and sign an agreement form for funds to be disbursed.
  2. Report on the progress of their research six months into the project.
  3. Disseminate their results within one year of completion.
  4. Provide ACRL with a summary of the research results that may be disseminated online, for example as part of a blog post or other update to the community.
  5. Acknowledge ACRL’s support in any publication or presentation resulting from this research.

Further Information

Resources on designing and conducting research are available on ALA’s LARKS webpage.

See the application frequently asked questions for more details on this program.

If your questions are not answered on the website, please contact ACRL Program Manager and Mellon/ACLS Public Fellow Sara Goek at: sgoek@ala.org or 312-280-5841.

Call for Applications: Institute for Research Design in Librarianship 2018

We are issuing a call for applications for the Institute for Research Design in Librarianship 2018. We are seeking novice librarian researchers who are employed by academic libraries or research libraries outside an academic setting in the United States to participate in the Institute. We define “novice” broadly; if you feel that you would benefit from being guided throughout the entire research design process, we encourage your application. Librarians of all levels of professional experience are welcome to apply.

The year-long experience begins with a workshop held on the campus of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, California, from June 3-9, 2018, with arrival on campus on Saturday, June 2, and departure on Sunday, June 10.
The William H. Hannon Library has received a second three-year grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to offer this continuing education opportunity (this grant, IRDL-2, is from 2016-2019). Each year 20 librarians will receive, at no cost to them, instruction in research design and a full year of peer/mentor support to complete a research project at their home institutions; the learning experience, travel to and from Los Angeles, CA, accommodations, and food will be supplied to Scholars free of charge.

We seek librarians with a passion for research and a desire to improve their research skills. IRDL is designed to bring together all that the literature tells us about the necessary conditions for librarians to conduct valid and reliable research in an institutional setting. The cohort will be chosen from a selective submission process, with an emphasis on enthusiasm for research and diversity from a variety of perspectives, including ethnicity and type and size of library.

Selection criteria:

  • Commitment to the year-long process of participating in the IRDL research community and conducting the proposed study within the 2017-2018 academic year;
  • Significance of the research problem to the operational success of libraries or to the profession of librarianship;
  • Thoughtfulness, thoroughness, and clarity of the research proposal;
  • Enthusiasm for research and a desire to learn.

We will be accepting applications from December 1, 2017 to January 27, 2018. Scholars accepted to the Institute will be notified in early March 2018. Application information may be found at http://irdlonline.org/call-for-proposals/institute-overview/.

Please contact Project Directors with any questions about the Institute or the application process:
Marie Kennedy, Serials & Electronic Resources Librarian, Loyola Marymount University (marie.kennedy@lmu.edu)
Kristine Brancolini, Dean of the Library, Loyola Marymount University (brancoli@lmu.edu)

Research Study: Archives in Libraries

Part of supporting scholarship is helping others with their research. When they arise, I’m going to start posting calls about surveys, studies, and the like that are designed with a research study in mind. I don’t know if/how these will be published, but supporting each other in these endeavors helps build a research and scholarship community.

___________________________________________________________________________________________

Good afternoon everyone,

I am developing a research proposal focused on the administrative dynamics surrounding archives that exist organizationally in libraries and the potential effects this parent-child relationship has on users. In particular, I am interested in talking with organizations that have reorganized the placement or structure of the archives unit within a library in the last 2 years. If you work in such an organization and are interested in participating in this study, please contact me at atodddiaz@towson.edu

Thank you in advance!

Ashley

Ashley Todd-Diaz, MSIS, MA, CA
Head of Special Collections and University Archives
Albert S. Cook Library
Towson University
Towson, Maryland

(Semi) Open Access: Taylor & Francis Journals

I recently found out that Taylor & Francis provides some content as open access. Much of what they have is behind subscription paywalls, but I am pleasantly surprised they offer a way to search their journals that’s available to anyone.

The search function is on their website. After a search, you’ll see both open and subscription content. On the left side is a box to check to limit to open access journals.

A quick search for “archives” yielded quite a few results. However, I know not all were relevant to the archival profession. But there are several library and archives journals published by Taylor & Francis, including Archives & ManuscriptsJournal of Archival OrganizationArchives and Records, and others.

This is a helpful resource for the many archivists whose institutions don’t subscribe to the database. Enjoy!

2017 SAA Research Forum Documents Available

The presentation slides and posters from this year’s SAA Research Forum are now available.

9:00-9:30 AM: Opening and Session 1

Welcome and Overview
Research Forum Program Committee [Slides]

Towards a Wicked Problems Research Agenda for Archival and Recordkeeping Scholarship
Eliot Wilczek (The MITRE Corporation) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Teaching Research Data Management to the World
Dr. Helen R. Tibbo (UNC-Chapel Hill) [Slides]

9:30-10:00 AM: Session 2: Examining Our Practice

Simple and Expedited Digital Appraisal/Processing: Testing Software and Developing a First Simple Workflow
Susanne Belovari (University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign) [Abstract/Bio]

Show Me Archives and the Community Engagement Legacy of Aurora Davis
Sarah Buchanan (University of Missouri) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

A Model for the Social Construction of Risk in the Audit and Certification of Trustworthy Digital Repositories
Rebecca D. Frank (University of Michigan) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

10:30-11:00 AM: Session 3: Repositories in Practice

Beyond the Repository: Exploring Integration Between Local and Distributed Digital Preservation Systems
Laura Alagna (Northwestern University) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

How Do Small Archives Steward Their Moving Image and Sound Collections? A Qualitative Study
Anthony Cocciolo (Pratt Institute) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Archives & DAM
Alice Cameron (Northwestern University) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

11:00-11:30 AM: Session 4: Architectural Records and Innovation

Actors, Artifacts, and Enduring Value in Architecture
Katie Pierce Meyer (University of Texas at Austin) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Asks and Answers: Interviews with Archivists on Born-Digital Design Records
Suzanne Noruschat (Yale University), Pamela Casey (Columbia University) [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

Memory Happens Now: A Collaborative Strategy for Digital Preservation of Organizational Records
Nancy Hadley (The American Institute of Architects) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

11:30 AM-Noon: Session 5: Adventures in Discovery

Evaluating How Archival Websites Allow Researchers to Prepare for an In-Person Visit
Scott Pitol (University of Illinois at Chicago) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Proof of Existence: Methods for Adding Archival Resources to Wikipedia
Emily Vigor (UC Berkeley) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Access Strategies for Born-Digital Archives: Lessons of the International Fellowships Program Project
Jane Gorjevsky (Columbia University), Dina Sokolova (Columbia University) [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

1:00-1:30 PM: Session 6: SAA Metadata and Digital Practice Review

Mark Matienzo (Stanford University) [Bio] [Slides]

3:00-3:30 PM: Session 7: Lightning Talks

Archiving the Websites of Contemporary Composers
Bess Pittman (NYU) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Software Preservation: Building a Community of Research Practitioners
Wendy Hagenmaier (University of Texas at Austin), Alexandra Chassanoff (MIT) [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

Teaching with Primary Sources: Building Resources for Success
Margery N. Sly (Temple University) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Archiving Spotify: How and Why to Track Your Music Streaming Data
Jennifer Eltringham (University of Denver) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Good/Bad, Happy/Sad: Conducting Sentiment Analysis on User Survey Data from Houghton Library with R
Emilie Hardman (Harvard University) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Adapting Archival Descriptions to the New Technology Environment
Jinfang Niu (University of South Florida) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

3:30-4:30 PM: Session 8: Exploring Diversity and Community Archives

“Her Own Version of History”: A Case Study of the Guerilla Girls Oral Histories at the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution
Erin Dickey (UNC Chapel-Hill) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

“Are You a Spy?”: Methodological Challenges to Studying Community Archives
Michelle Caswell (UCLA), Joyce Gabiola (UCLA) [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

Diversity and Inclusion: Building the Texas Disability History Collection
Samantha Dodd (University of Texas at Arlington) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Cultural Diversity Competency’s Role in Diversity, Inclusion and Community Engagement
Helen Wong Smith (Kaua’i Historical Society) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Descriptive Practices on a Human Scale: Lessons from the StoryCorps Archive
Virginia Millington (StoryCorps) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Cataloging in Spanglish: Capturing the Puerto Rican Experience Stateside Through Metadata (with Some Help from the Community)
Lindsay Wittwer (Hunter College, CUNY) [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

4:30-5:00 PM: Session 9 and Closing

OSSArcFlow: Researching Archival Workflows for Born-Digital Content
Christopher (Cal) Lee (UNC-Chapel Hill), Jessica Meyerson (Educopia Institute) [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

Looking Ahead to Next Year
Research Forum Program Committee [Slides]

Posters

C2Metadata Project
Jared Lyle (ICPSR, University of Michigan) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

“Thinking About Appraisal”: Defining Appraisal Frameworks as a Continuum
Joshua Kitchens (Clayton State University) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster] [Notes]

Curating Software: Practice and Promise
Alexandra Chassanoff (MIT) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Development of an Ontology of Functional Activities for Records Management and Archival Systems
Georg Gaenser (University of British Columbia) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

The State of Reappraisal and Deaccessioning in Archives
Marcella (Wiget) Huggard (University of Kansas), Laura Uglean Jackson (UC Irvine) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Providing Access to Community Archives within Government Archives
Patricia Galloway (University of Texas at Austin) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Crowdsourced Transcription of Handwritten Mental Health Records
Unmil P. Karadkar (University of Texas at Austin) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

In Search of Longitudinal Health Data: Bridging the Divide Between Historical Medical Records and EHRs
Lorrie Dong (University of Texas at Austin) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Digital Preservation Storage Criteria: Community Document for Discussion
Gail Truman (Truman Technologies) , Kate Zwaard (Library of Congress), Sibyl Schaefer (UC San Diego), Jane Mandelbaum (Library of Congress), Nancy McGovern (MIT), Steve Knight (National Library of New Zealand), Andrea Goethals (Harvard University) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Understanding (Mis)perceptions of Archives
Kelsey Duinkerken (Thomas Jefferson University) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Gender Identity and Performance in Library Work
Tatiana Bryant (University of Oregon), Hilary Bussell (Ohio State University) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Juggling Priorities: Lessons Learned During a Community Documentation Project
Tammi Kim (University of Nevada, Las Vegas), Emily Lapworth (University of Nevada, Las Vegas) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Mix and Match: Exploring Processing Efficiencies for Born-Digital Materials
Karla Irwin (University of Nevada, Las Vegas), Cyndi Shein (University of Nevada, Las Vegas) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster] [Notes]

Moving Image Social Tagging: Professional vs. Amateur Production Comparison
Edward Benoit (Louisiana State University) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Decisions Are Never Easy: Establishing Processing Priorities
Amy Cooper Cary (Marquette University), Pam Hackbart-Dean (Southern Illinois University, Carbondale) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Collections, Discovery, Users, and Use: A Systematic Assessment of Statistics for the University of Nevada, Reno Special Collections
Jeremy Floyd (University of Nevada, Reno), Jessica Maddox (University of Nevada, Reno) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Fostering Stakeholder Engagement by Building Archivist Competencies in Technology: A Preliminary Discussion
Amanda Jamieson (Western University), Anne Daniel (Western University), Amanda Oliver (Western University) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Festival Caravan: Diversity in Action
Nathalie Proulx (Carson Brierly Griffin Dance Library) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Capturing the Current Scope: A Holdings Survey Initiative at the Detroit Institute of Arts’ Research Library and Archives
Danae Dracht (Detroit Institute of Arts) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Manuscript Cookbooks Survey: Building a Research Portal for Manuscript Cookbooks and Kitchen Artifacts
Alyse Hennig (Manuscript Cookbooks Survey) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Edit This! Enhancing Collaborative Public Programming Through Wikipedia Events
Rose Sliger Krause (Eastern Washington University), James Rosenzweig (Eastern Washington University), Logan Comporeale (Eastern Washington University) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster] [Handout]

Student Employment Matters: Mapping Literacies and Learning Outcomes in Special and Digital Collections
Erin Passehl-Stoddart (University of Idaho) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Extracting Metadata from Digital Records Using Computational Methods
Ann Marie Mesco (Carnegie Mellon University), Kate Barbera (Carnegie Mellon University) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

BitCurator NLP: Natural Language Processing for the Rest of Us
Christopher (Cal) Lee (UNC-Chapel Hill) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Where Are the Original Documents?: Comparison of Several “Captured Japanese Air Technical Documents” Lists
Yayoi Tsutsui (Hototsubashi University) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster] [Notes]

Paradigms & Possibilities of Incarceration-Related Records
Rhiannon Cates (Portland State University) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Archival Description and Network Analysis
Cory Nimer (Brigham Young University) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Using the Archiving Lab: Values, Impacts, and Discourses
Amy Wickner (University of Maryland, College Park) [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]