Oral History Association Awards

2020 OHA Award Winners

Article Award

Henry Greenspan’s article, “The Humanities of Contingency: Interviewing and Teaching Beyond “Testimony” with Holocaust Survivors,” [Oral History Review 46:2(Summer/Fall, 2019), 360-379] contributes to socio/historical inquiry goes beyond the collection of testimonies from Holocaust survivors. Greenspan’s call to engage with testimony beyond the collection of experiences takes the practice of oral history into an even more dynamic practice where the actual people become 3D characters. It calls for an engagement with the people with the stories and even the reader’s or interviewer’s own positionality or understanding of the topic.

Book Award

The Oral History Association Book Award committee enthusiastically names Nepia Mahuika’s exceptional book Rethinking Oral History and Tradition: An Indigenous Perspective as the winner of the 2020 prize. We also wish to recognize Jacquelyn Dowd Hall’s, Sisters and Rebels: A Struggle for the Soul of America, with an honorable mention. In addition to embodying the very best in the practice of oral history, both books were inspiring to read in this unsettling time.

Rethinking Oral History and Tradition provokes a thoroughgoing decolonization of our conception of the field of oral history by demonstrating that indigenous oral accounts are oral history. Focusing on a case study of the Maori in Aotearoa, New Zealand, the book confronts a longstanding problem: the condescending and dismissive stance of non-indigenous professional oral historians and other scholars, who have relegated Maori oral accounts to the realm of myth rather than respecting indigenous practices as legitimate forms of oral history. Drawing on sixty interviews he conducted within his tribe (Ngāti Porou), Mahuika recasts oral history as a dynamic, organic, and multi-generational exchange within indigenous cultures that takes place within the context of people’s daily lives. He shows that a lack of attention to the nuance of language partly explains why Maori oral accounts have been relegated to the realm of “oral tradition” and discounted in the reconstruction of Maori history.  Scholars simply did not understand the significant role metaphors play in their language. Ultimately, Mahuika’s elegant and refreshing book makes the case for not shoehorning an indigenous perspective into the existing field, but for totally reimagining and broadening the field of oral history.

Sisters and Rebels is a page-turner about two women’s complicated and noble mission to transform the region of their birth and the United States as a whole. Drawing on oral history interviews Hall conducted over the course of nearly fifty years, the book tells the individual and intertwined stories of three remarkable sisters from a former southern slaveowning family, Elizabeth, Grace, and Katherine Lumpkin. While Elizabeth clings to the Lost Cause ideology she imbibed in their youth, Grace and Katherine rebelled against and transcended the racism and mythology of their southern upbringing to fight for justice and women’s liberation. Sisters and Rebels is the work of a giant of the field that not only demonstrates Hall’s skill and sensitivity as an interviewer, but also restores readers’ faith that individuals can cast off the destructive ideologies of their childhoods to help transform society in meaningful ways.

Mason Multi-Media Awards

Refugee Boulevard: Making Montreal Home After the Holocaust creatively documents narrators’ stories through a survivor-led historical audio tour, and accompanying booklet and website available in French and English. Building on long-standing relationships with survivors, new multi-session interviews were conducted to connect stories of experiences from 1948 within neighborhood sites. The audiowalk features the voices of six War Orphans Project storytellers and the narrator, all of whom were Holocaust refugees. Voices are integrated with music and soundscapes that enhance the listener’s experience. The accompanying booklet is designed well and enriches the audiowalk with the map, historical photographs and text. Notably, the Refugee Boulevard project currently reaches the community through collaborative partnerships with two museums, as well as informs curriculum for teaching Canadian Studies and History at two Montreal universities. This beautifully conceived and executed project provides a great sense of the power of oral history for contributing to the historical record through community engagement.

Authors: Stacey Zembrzycki, Eszter Andor, Nancy Rabelo and Anna Sheftel

Voices of Virginia: An Auditory Primary Source Reader compiles oral histories across five decades and from twenty repositories into an open-access reader for high school and college students. The reader is organized well by topic, time period, and description, and offers easy links for downloading or listening to the seventy interview excerpts. The audio files were licensed through a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial ShareAlike 4.0 license. Content in the Reader is aligned with the History and Social Science Standards for Virginia Public Schools. Section I includes transcripts, context, and discussion questions. Section II offers six lesson plans. This replicable project demonstrates the power of oral history, offers new ways to think about the state’s history through diverse voices of narrators, and broadens access to archived interviews.

Author: Jessica Taylor

The Wisconsin Farms Oral History Project: Lands We Share initiative showcased oral histories in a unique way with a traveling exhibition and community conversation tour at twelve venues throughout the state. Oral histories conducted at five farm sites were highlighted in the exhibit and radio series broadcasts. The stories encompassed some of Wisconsin’s rich cultural diversity and history, including the Oneida Indians, Hmong immigrants, agricultural wage laborers from Mexico and Laos, African-American community activists, and multi-generational German immigrants. Notably, the organizers extended the exhibit’s possibilities by including interactive elements for visitors at each community location, including a culmination farm dinner and conversation. The Lands We Share reached almost 3,000 exhibit visitors, 600 guests at community dinners, and over 100,000 radio listeners. Partnerships and collaborations with communities from the initial oral history project were extended from the Lands We Share initiative and have inspired subsequent oral histories and possibilities for curriculum development.

Author: Stephen Kercher

Postsecondary Teaching Award

Professor Ricia Anne Chansky’s Mi María: Puerto Rico after the Hurricane showed the strength of a dual language project that was fully transcribed and translated. The committee was impressed in the interdisciplinary approach to this subject matter at a primarily STEM focused institution. Her integration of oral history with this general education course through the Department of English creativity allowed a group of newly trained students to engage with the practice. The ongoing civic engagement with the community created a place for survivors to reflect and archive their collective memories. Professor Chansky provided the “ethics of care for my students” in these dire circumstances to facilitate this project. Students in turn found solace in their collective experience and rapport beyond the classroom assignment with their narrators. In these dire conditions with limited access to electricity, this project succeeded that marked our scores high in “civic or community component.” The standard of this collection sets a precedence for future collections at this and other institutions.

Emerging Crisis

Ricia Chansky’s “Mi María” project is a large-scale public humanities project that uses oral history and other biographical methodologies—contextualized in critical disaster studies and environmental humanities—to study the impacts of Hurricane María on the people of Puerto Rico while working to resituate the national narrative from stories about the people to those by the people. This new phase of the project, “Sheltered in Place,” works to understand connections between the climate emergency and the public health crisis of Covid-19 in marginalized and underserved communities that are disproportionately impacted by both. A secondary objective of this project is to devise methods for creatively listening to and circulating life stories in a time of necessitated physical distancing.

Sierra Holt’s project is to produce an oral history of the descendants of the community who live in or near Lambert Lands. Lambert Lands became the home of newly emancipated people from Bedford County, Virginia in 1843. After establishing their settlement, this group obtained a deed, built a church, and developed the oldest Emancipation celebration, which continues today. They also were a stopping point for those escaping slavery in the South.  Since its creation, the legacy of Lambert Lands has continued despite threats of violence from the Klu Klux Klan, growing poverty in Appalachia, and numerous drug epidemics.  To fully comprehend the history of this community, Holt will also research and interview distant relatives who hold knowledge of the community’s origins in Bedford County, Virginia. For preservation, the results of these interviews will be donated to a library or archive housed at an academic institution or museum, particularly one that is focused on Southern and/or Appalachian Black history.

Archives & Manuscripts Publication Award Winners

Sigrid McCausland Emerging Writers Award

We are pleased to announce the 2019 recipients of the Archives & Manuscripts Sigrid McCausland Emerging Writers Award. The award recognises the work of emerging writers who have published an article in the journal. Each year the members of Archives & Manuscripts Editorial Board decide the winner of this award, which features a $1000 cash payment.

Congratulations to the 2019 recipients of the Archives & Manuscripts Sigrid McCausland Emerging Writers Award – Sharon Huebner and Stella Marr for their article ‘Between Policy and Practice: Archival Descriptions, Digital Returns and a place for coalescing narratives’ published in Volume 47, Number 1.

Citation:

This is a very powerful article that uses the instance of the Strathfieldsaye Estate collection at the University of Melbourne Archives as a way of opening out questions of how mainstream archiving practice can productively engage with Indigenous epistemologies. It shows how shared custodianship of cultural heritage can provide new ways to understand the meaning and significance of materials that have previously only been understood within the colonial historical record. This article contributes to important and timely debates around decolonising the archive and the politics of ownership. It also shows how critical heritage materials are to healing, to community and to cultural activism.

Mander Jones Award

Congratulations to the 2019 Mander Jones Award recipients who were presented with an Award or Commendation certificate and Judges’ Comments at the Mander Jones Awards ceremony, held after the Annual General Meeting on 18 September 2020 in the Dixson Room, State Library of New South Wales.

Award Recipients

Category 1A:  (Not awarded)

Category 1B:   Kirsten Thorpe, ‘Transformative Praxis – Building Spaces for Indigenous Self-Determination in Libraries and Archives’, in In The Library With The Lead Pipe.

Category 2A: Clive Smith, Port Macquarie’s Last Convicts: the end of the convict establishment at Port Macquarie as told by the original documents

Category 2B: Cate O’Neill, ‘The shifting significance of child endowment records at the National Archives of Australia’, in Archival Science, Vol 19, issue 3, 2019, pp. 235-253

Category 3: Terry Kass, ‘Unlocking land: A guide to Crown Land Records held at State Archives NSW’

Category 4: Iain Wallace & Sandra Funnell, ‘Fort Street Tours App

Category 5: Kirsten Wright, ‘Archival Interventions and the language we use’, in Archival Science Vol. 19, No. 4 (December 2019, published online May 2019), pp. 331-348

Category 6: Gregory Rolan, Joanne Evans, Rhiannon Abeling, Aedan Brittain, Elizabeth Constable, Matthew Kelemen, & Ella Roberts, ‘Voice, agency and equity: deep community collaboration in record-keeping research’ in Information Research, Vol. 24 , No. 3, 2019

Category 7: (Not awarded)

Category 8: Vanessa Finney, ‘Capturing Nature: Early Scientific Photography at the Australian Museum 1857-1893’

Commendation Recipients

Category 2B Joint: Tony James Brady, ‘The Empire has an Answer: The Empire Air Training Scheme as reported in the Australian Press 1939-1945’

Category 2B Joint: Tiffany Shellam, ‘Meeting the Waylo: Aboriginal encounters in the archipelago’

Category 3: Narrelle Morris, ‘Japanese war crimes in the Pacific: Australia’s investigations and prosecutions’

Category 5: Joanne Evans, Sue McKemmish, and Gregory Rolan, ‘Participatory information governance: Transforming recordkeeping for childhood out-of-home Care’ in Records Management Journal, Vol. 29, No. 1/2, 2019, pp. 178-193

Category 6: Evanthia Samaras and Andrew Johnston, ‘Off-Lining to Tape Is Not Archiving: Why We Need Real Archiving to Support Media Archaeology and Ensure Our Visual Effects Legacy Thrives’ in Leonardo, Vol. 52, No. 4, 2019, pp. 374-380

Visit the Mander Jones Awards Recipients page to read the judges comments for each award.

Call for papers for the Tunnock Essay Prize (Scottish Archives)

We present you today a great opportunity to have your research published in a well-respected journal and receive a prize of £250.

The weather is wonderful and the archives are closed but you may well still be in a position to think about writing up an entry for the Tunnock Essay Prize. Aimed at post graduates and kindly sponsored by Thomas Tunnock Ltd, entries should focus on the use and interpretation of Scottish Archives both within Scotland and further afield.  Submissions should consist of between 4,000 and 6,000 words. Any submission that makes use of archival material to explore historical matters relevant to Scotland will be considered. The winning entry will be awarded a prize of £250 and, subject to peer review, will be eligible for publication in Scottish Archives, the journal of the Scottish Records Association.

The closing date for entries is 1 September 2020.

Further details are available on the SRA website at https://www.scottishrecordsassociation.org/the-tunnock-prize-2020 or email: editorscottisharchives@gmail.com

Call for Nominations: Arline Custer Memorial Award

Arline Custer Memorial Award

DEADLINE: July 31, 2020

The Arline Custer Memorial Award  is presented by the MARAC Arline Custer Memorial Award Committee. This award honors the memory of Arline Custer (1909-1975), MARAC member and editor of the National Union Catalog of Manuscript Collections.

Eligibility
The Arline Custer Memorial Award recognizes the best books and articles written or compiled by individuals and institutions in the MARAC region – the District of Columbia, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia.

Works under consideration include, but are not limited to, monographs, popular narratives, reference works and exhibition catalogs using archival sources.

Individuals or institutions may submit up to two works published between July 1, 2019 and June 30, 2020.

Evaluation
Works must be relevant to the general public as well as the archival community. They also should be original and well-researched using available sources. In addition, they should be clearly presented, well-written and organized. Visual materials, if used, should be appropriate to the text.

Preference will be given to works by archivists.

Award
Up to three awards may be given, with a maximum value of $200.00 for books and $100.00 for articles. The 2020 award(s) will be announced at the Fall 2020 Conference in Long Branch, NJ.

Electronic Submission Instructions
Please send a PDF of the entirety of the work along with a PDF of a letter of nomination to the Senior Co-Chair of the Arline Custer Memorial Award Committee:

Jasmine Smith
Reference & Instruction Librarian
Alvernia University, Dr. Frank A. Franco Library
Email: jasmine.smith@alvernia.edu

Physical Submission Instructions

Please send two physical copies of each submission with a letter of nomination to the Senior Co-Chair of the Arline Custer Memorial Award Committee. Please email the Sr. Co-Chair to request the mailing address.

Email: jasmine.smith@alvernia.edu

Entries must be received by July 31, 2020

See past recipients.

Journal of Western Archives Honors Best General Interest Articles 

The recipient of the Journal of Western Archives award for Best General Interest Article is ‘”The Right to Know’: Decolonizing Native American Archives,” which focuses on the movement to restore control of tribal history to Indigenous peoples, by Jennifer O’Neal from the University of Oregon Libraries Special Collections and University Archives. In addition, the committee awarded an honorable mention to “Jumping In: Creating an Assessment Program for the L. Tom Perry Special Collections Reading Room, coauthored by Cindy Brightenburg and SAA Publications Board member Gordon Daines, both from Brigham Young University. “Jumping In” pioneers the application of the new SAA/RBMS guidelines for public service metrics, provides original user services data, and offers a model that can be adapted for use at other institutions. Congrats to all!

Mander Jones Awards Judging Committee: Call for Expressions of Interest for a new Judge

for members of the Australian Society of Archivists:

Since 1996 the ASA has been awarding the Mander Jones Awards for publications in the field of archives and recordkeeping.

The Awards are judged by a team of three which reports its recommendations to the Council. The 2019 Judges were Peter Crush, Prue Heath, and Catherine Robinson.

In 2020 Peter Crush and Catherine Robinson are continuing in this role, and Prue Heath has stepped down for 2020. The Council is grateful to Prue for her service to the Awards, and is now seeking a new Judge for 2020.

Eligible candidates must be an ASA Member* and should have:

  • substantial experience as a practising Archivist; and
  • a relatively wide acquaintance with Australian recordkeeping and archival literature.

Judges need to commit to 15-20 hours per week from mid-March to the end of July each year, to read and assess the nominated works, prepare judges’ reports, liaise with other judges, and develop citations for winning nominations.

We particularly encourage archivists working in the small archive sector to apply.

Please address Expressions of Interest and any questions to the Mander Jones Awards Secretary, Dr Louise Trott via email by 28 February 2020.

* Note the ASA Council will consider applications from all ASA members who can demonstrate relevant experience and knowledge.

Call for Nominations: SAA Waldo Gifford Leland Award

Waldo Gifford Leland Award

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Created in 1959, this prize encourages and rewards writing of superior excellence and usefulness in the field of archival history, theory, or practice.

Eligibility:

Monographs or documentary publications in print or digital editions published in English during the previous calendar year are eligible. Periodicals are not eligible.

Submission Requirements:

A completed nomination form and THREE copies of the publication.

Sponsor and Funding:

The Society of American Archivists Foundation, in honor of Waldo Gifford Leland, who authored the landmark Guide to the Archives of the Government of the United States in Washington (1904), was active in the organization of the Conference of Archivists in 1909, played a central role in the establishment of the U.S. National Archives, and served two terms as SAA President during the 1940s.

Prize:

A certificate and cash prize of $1,000.

First Awarded:

1959

Selection Committee:

The Leland Award Subcommittee of the SAA Awards Committee consists of three members of the Society of American Archivists and one of the co-chairs of the Awards Committee (ex officio). One member of the subcommittee shall be appointed each year by the SAA President-elect for a term of three years. The senior member of the subcommittee in years of service shall serve as its chair.

Application Deadline and Nomination Form:

Preview and/or start the nomination form. All nominations must be submitted by February 28 of each year.

View past winners.

Call for Nominations: SAA Preservation Publication Award

The Society of American Archivists Preservation Publication Award Subcommittee is seeking nominations for the prestigious Preservation Publication Award.

Do you know of an outstanding preservation-related work published in 2019? Would you like to see the author(s) or editor(s) recognized for contributing to preservation and the archives profession?

Please consider submitting a nomination prior to the deadline of February 28, 2020.

The nomination form is available at https://app.smarterselect.com/programs/45677-Society-Of-American-Archivists

Additional information can be found at www2.archivists.org/governance/handbook/section12-preservation   I encourage you to check out the list of previous winners at the bottom of this page. Past winners have published important works on a wide range of preservation topics, including general archives and electronic records preservation, special media conservation, facilities standards for archives, and emergency preparedness and response.

Here is some additional information about the award from the SAA website:

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Established in 1993, this award recognizes and acknowledges the author(s) or editor(s) of an outstanding published work relating to archives preservation and, through this acknowledgement, encourages outstanding achievement by others. The work can be an article, report, chapter, or monograph in an audiovisual, electronic or print format.

The work must contribute to the advancement of the theory and practice of preservation in archives institutions by introducing new preservation theories, methods, or techniques; by codifying principles and practices of archives preservation; by presenting the results of innovative research on matters related to archives preservation; by investigating preservation issues of current interest and importance to the archives community; or by studying aspects of the history of archives profession.

Eligibility:

Awarded to the author(s) or editor(s) of an outstanding preservation- related work that is of relevance to the North American archives community and published during the preceding calendar year.

Please feel free to contact me, or any other member of the Preservation Publication Award Subcommittee, directly with any questions you may have about the nomination process.

Sincerely,
Karla Irwin
karla.irwin@unlv.edu
SAA Preservation Publication Award Subcommittee, Chair

Publications Awards Announced: Australian Society of Archivists

2018 Archives & Manuscripts Emerging Writers Award announced

22 Oct 2019

Congratulations to the 2018 recipient of the Archives & Manuscripts Sigrid McCausland Emerging Writers Award – Hannah Ishmael. The award recognises the work of emerging writers who have published an article in the journal. Each year the members of Archives & Manuscripts Editorial Board decide the winner of this award, which features a $1000 cash payment.

  • 2018 – Volume 46, Number 3, November 2018 – Hannah Ishmael, ‘Reclaiming history: Arthur Schomburg’.

2018 Publications Mander Jones Awards Recipients Announced

22 Oct 2019

Congratulations to the 2018 Mander Jones Award recipients who were presented with an Award or Commendation certificate and Judges’ Comments at the Welcome Reception.

Recipients

Category 1B: Maryanne Dever, Archives and New Modes of Feminist Research

Category 2A: World War 1 Writers Group, Ku-ring-gai Historical Society Inc., Rallying the Troops: A World War 1 Commemoration (Volume IV)

Category 2B: Frank Clarke, Graeme Dean, and Martin Persson, Accounting Thought and Practice Reform: Ray Chambers’ Odyssey

Category 3: Lisa Joseph and Fiona Milway, Finding Aids from the National Library of Australia’s Sidney Nolan Project, published online

Category 4: Iain Wallace and Jules Davies, Fort Street High School History and Archives webpages

Category 5: Michael Jones, “From Catalogues to Contextual Networks: Reconfiguring Collection Documentation in Museums”, Archives and Records 39, No.1 (24 April 2018)

Category 6: Gregory Rolan, Joanne Evans, Jane Bone, Antonina Lewis, Frank Golding, Jacqueline Z. Wilson, Sue McKemmish, Philip Mendes, and Keir Reeves, “Weapons of Affect: the imperative for transdisciplinary Information Systems design” in Building and Sustaining an Ethical Future with Emerging Technology: Proceedings of the ASIS&T 81st Annual Meeting 2018. Vancouver: Association for Information Science and Technology.

Category 7 Joint winner: Barbara Swebeck, Anna-Bella Silva, and Natalie Dimmock, Report on the Archives and Memorabilia of the Botany R.S.L Sub-Branch [established 1946]

Category 7 Joint winner: Michael O’Connor, Police and Policing in Western Australia 1829 to 1945

Category 8: Public Records Office of Victoria PROV, Provenance: the journal of Public Record Office Victoria, Issue 16, 2018

Commendation

Category 8: Sophie Garrett et al, Inside the Repository – A Virtual Tour of the University of Melbourne Archives, 2018.

Awards for Publication Excellence

Congrats to Laurainne Ojo-Ohikuare, athletics archivist at the University of Maryland, College Park, who is a recipient of the 2019 Grand Award from APEX (Awards for Publication Excellence) for her gripping article, “Dropped onto the Processing Table: A CIA Cover-Up.” Given annually by Communications Concepts Inc, the award is APEX’s highest recognition of publication excellence. The article, published in Archival Outlook (November/December 2018), describes Ojo-Ohikuare’s decision to go against the dictum of “More Product, Less Process”—and the resulting discovery involving a cover-up by a federal government agency.