SAA One Book, One Profession

With the rise of events such as the Women’s Marches and the #MeToo movement, women’s voices are being heard loud and clear—and are being documented. As archivists collect protest posters and create new digital archives, now is an opportune time to reflect on the history of women’s archives and the struggle to achieve equal representation within the historical record.

Seizing the moment, the SAA Publications Board has selected Perspectives on Women’s Archives, edited by Tanya Zanish-Belcher and Anke Voss, for its One Book, One Profession reading initiative. The book features eighteen essays written by noted archivists and historians that illustrate the origins of a women-centered history, the urgent need to locate records that highlight the diverse experiences of women, and the effort to document women’s experiences. Deftly examining American culture and society over the past few centuries, the essays also expose the need for renewed collaboration between archivists and historians, the challenges related to the accessibility of women’s collections, and the development of community archives.

As one book reviewer noted: “Perspectives on Women’s Archives provides a useful summary of the development of the field of women’s history since the emergence of the discipline in the 1970s and of the growth of women’s archives from the earliest days of the republic. . . . It also offers stimulating prescriptions for the future direction of archives and raises urgent questions about the quality and equality of access in our overwhelmingly digital environment” (Christine Froechtenigt Harper, City of St. Louis, Archival Issues 36.1).

The One Book, One Profession edition includes a study guide (for the first edition, the discussion questions are also available here). This book is an excellent resource for thinking about the value of women’s and genderqueer archives and how to fill the gaps in our recordkeeping to move toward a more diverse and inclusive future.

Let’s read Perspectives on Women’s Archives—together!

Study Guide Questions: Host a book discussion within your institution, among archivists in your community, or at a regional meeting! Download study guide questions to further your conversation.

Related Reading & Resources: Browse a list of related articles from American Archivist and Archival Outlook.

Selected Events:

ARCHIVES*RECORDS 2018 in Washington, DC

Tips for Leading a Lively Discussion

Twitter Discussions

  • Follow #OBOP18 on twitter for more updates and to join the conversation profession-wide

One Book, One Profession 2017 selection: Through the Archival Looking Glass: A Reader on Diversity and Inclusion

One Book, One Profession 2016 selection: Teaching with Primary Sources

Call for Contributions: Select History of the World’s Archives, 1588-1898

In 2015 the Archival History Section of the Society of American Archivists compiled a Bibliography of Archival History. The recently revised document is currently available on our microsite: goo.gl/nlM1lT

We are now compiling a bibliography of a Select History of the World’s Archives, 1588-1898.  This new bibliography is international in scope and includes sources about or published by archives before 1899.  The bibliography includes works in English and foreign languages.  The AHS Steering Committee is seeking assistance from the SAA membership to fulfill this project.

If you are interested in contributing citations to this project, please view our current bibliography here: goo.gl/VsrBZK

Guidelines for formatting citations can be found on the Archival History Section microsite: goo.gl/CJZT0F

You can make comments directly on the Google document or email me with your citations or questions at cbtrace@austin.utexas.edu.

Thank you for your help in our ongoing project!

Best,

Ciaran B. Trace

Archival History Section

Visual Materials Bibliography

The SAA Visual Materials Section recently updated their Bibliography. This is a great resource and will be helpful for anyone interested in the topic. Great job to all who contributed!

Here’s the outline:
1. Photography–History and General Works
1.A Reference works (encyclopedias, dictionaries)
1.B Discursive Texts
1.C Aesthetics, Criticism, and Interpretation
1.D Photographers (Biographies, Directories)
2. Visual Processes, Formats, and Technical Manuals
2.A Photography
2.B Moving Image Materials
2.B.1 Motion Picture Film
2.B.2 Videotape
2.B.3 Digital Moving Image Formats
2.C. Selected Print Technologies (Lithography, Chromolithography)
2.D. Visual Ephemera
2.E. Architectural Records
3. Visual Materials Published Repository Guides and Catalogs
3.A. National Guides/Union Catalogs
3.B Regional Resources
3.C United States- State by State
4. Archives/Collections Management of Visual Materials
4.A General works
4.B. Preservation
4.C. Conservation
4.D. Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Recovery
4.E. Cataloging standards and tools
4.E.1 Organization / Metadata (e.g. EADMARC, Dublin Core, ADAG)
4.E.2 Description & Content (e.g. AAT, LCSH, TGM, APPM DACS)
4.F. Processing, Arrangement and Description of Visual Materials
5. Reformatting of Visual Materials
5.A Digitization
5.B Microfilming
5.C Optical Disk
6. Essential Visual Materials Serials
6.A Photography
6.B Motion Picture Film

Newsletter Calls and Issues

A while ago, I started posting calls for content and new issues for newsletters. I’ve found that there’s much activity and it’s hard to keep up with the calls in a timely manner without them dominating this blog. Instead, I’m going to occasionally post reminders that publishing opportunities are always available for newsletters.

See my compiled list of newsletters.

I encourage writing for newsletters because there’s usually a quicker turnaround and they are always looking for content. But mostly, because it’s a great way to start writing. It can be overwhelming to think about starting with a scholarly article, so writing short pieces is good practice while getting another line on your resume. Plus, they generally don’t require research and instead focus more on current project and activities. So go share with your colleagues!

Digital Humanities Reading List

Though this list is mostly for libraries and scholarly communication, archives intersects at points.

LIBER’s Digital Humanities & Digital Cultural Heritage Working Group is gathering literature for libraries with an interest in digital humanities. Four teams, each with a specific focus, have assembled a list of must-read papers, articles and reports.

Digital Humanities Reading List Part 1

Digital Humanities Reading List Part 2

Digital Humanities Reading List Part 3

(part 4 coming soon)

Job Announcement: Associate Editor, The Papers of the Revolutionary Era Pinckney Statesmen

The University of South Carolina Department of History seeks an Associate Editor to assist in the editing and preparation of the digital edition of the Papers of the Revolutionary Era Pinckney Statesmen.**

Minimum qualification: MA in American History or closely related field, experience in scholarly editing.

Preferred qualifications: ABD or PhD in American History or closely related field, with knowledge of early national South Carolina history, diplomatic history, or military history. A reading and translation ability in French or Spanish is desirable but not required.

Responsibilities include:

  • Researching new documents, creating original transcriptions of texts, and verification (proofreading) of transcriptions of texts against source document for accuracy and formatting.
  • Conducting detailed research for annotation (broader subjects as well as identifications and cross references); drafting and editing of annotation and editorial notes.
  • Entry of texts and annotation information and citations into the DocTracker database system
  • Assisting Project Director with grant applications and grant reports
  • Assisting in preparation of digital files for publisher.
  • Supervising student workers and/or interns.

Job is posted at the University of South Carolina jobs website, http://uscjobs.sc.edu/postings/26760 . Position will remain open until filled.

**This is a full-time temporary position ending on September 30, 2020 with possibility of extension.

 

Happy New Year!

I hope everyone had a wonderful holiday season!

As promised, I’m returning to this blog. I saw some announcements in the past few weeks that I’ll do my best to catch up on, but likely I’ll miss a few. If you know of something you believe is important to include, feel free to get in touch.

I’ll continue with announcements, and I also plan to continue posts about books and perhaps other resources about writing. There seems to be a lot of activity so I expect to provide much in the coming days.

Thanks for reading!