CFP: Journal of the Society of North Carolina Archivists

Call for Papers – Deadline – October 20, 2020

J-SNCA is a peer-reviewed journal that seeks to support the theoretical, practical, and scholarly aspects of the archival profession. The editorial board of J-SNCA invites members of the research and archival communities to submit articles for a general issue on archival topics to be published in the Winter of 2020/2021.

Focuses on archival methodology, metadata, collecting practices, outreach, and rethinking the goals of archival work in our current age, especially considering COVID-19 and the national conversation on efforts towards anti-racism are all welcome.

The deadline for article submission is October 1, 2020. All members of the archival community, including students and independent researchers, are welcome to submit articles. If you were slated to present at the cancelled 2020 Society of North Carolina Archivists conference you are particularly encouraged to submit a paper based on your presentation. Contributors need not be members of Society of North Carolina Archivists or live in the state of North Carolina. Article proposals are welcome and encouraged.

Submission guidelines can be found at http://www.ncarchivists.org/publications/journal-ofthesociety-of-north-carolina-archivists-j-snca/manuscript-submission-guidelines/

***Membership is not required for submissions or inclusion in the journal***

Best,
Kristen Merryman
Managing Editor, JSNCA

JCAS Reading Group with Elizabeth Joan Kelly

Details

Tuesday, July 28, 2020 at 1 PM – 2 PM EDT

Hosted by Journal of Contemporary Archival Studies

Online Event

Join us for a Q&A session with JCAS author Elizabeth Joan Kelly about her article “Assessing Impact of Medium-Sized Institution Digital Cultural Heritage on Wikimedia Projects.” Read the article and discuss strategies for increasing access to digital cultural heritage resources.

Download the article: elischolar.library.yale.edu/jcas/vol6/iss1/25

This event is free and will be hosted by the NEA Education Committee using Zoom. Registration is limited to 100 participants.

New Page: Bibliographies

Greetings Readers-

I have often seen people post requests to listservs, social media, or other places for ideas on literature to read on topics. It can be time consuming to do the research to find helpful and relevant information, and often someone else has already done it.

Therefore, I created a new page for Bibliographies. I started with SAA, SAA Sections, and did some other searching to start this compilation. I know there are many, many more out there, so please send me ones you’ve created or ones you know will be helpful to other archivists.

To stay within the goals of this blog, I’m looking for bibliographies that are directly beneficial to archivists, the work we do, and the knowledge we need. Here are some guidelines:

  • Focused on articles, books, and scholarly works
  • Grounded in, but not limited to, archival literature
  • May include works by our allied and related professions
  • May include supplemental resources (e.g. websites, blogs, etc.)
  • Can be in any format: Word, PDF, websites, Zotero, Google Docs, etc.

Have ideas for a topic where a bibliography doesn’t exist? Create one! And if you’re not sure how or where to start, let me know and let’s work together to start one.

I am very open to recommendations – I want this to be a helpful resource for archivists so please be in touch with any ideas.

Contact me with your suggestions!

IASA Research Grant

IASA Research Grant Guidelines
IASA regularly offers financial awards to encourage and support research and publication within the field of audiovisual archiving and preservation. In order to be considered for a research grant, the following guidelines apply:

  1. Research can, but need not, form part of an academic programme.
  2. The level of financial support will be determined by the IASA Executive Board individually on a case by case basis, but individual awards will not normally exceed Euro 2,000. All costs are eligible if the applicant can show clear justification for them within the scope, aims, and purposes of the project.
  3. IASA will only consider applications from IASA members whose membership is in good standing at the time of application.
  4. IASA promotes diversity in the audiovisual archiving field and encourages applications from developing countries.
  5. IASA will support a research project only if there is evidence that the results are within the scope of IASA’s purposes. This includes, but is not limited to the care of, access to, and long term preservation of sound and audiovisual heritage including the development of best professional standards and practice for sound and audiovisual heritage. See paragraph 2 of the IASA constitution (www.iasa-web.org/iasa-constitution#intro) for an articulation of IASA’s purposes.
  6. Depending on the scope and the overall duration of a research project, the applicant should arrange appropriately defined project phases. Interim reports should be sent to IASA at the end of each phase. A final report must be submitted no later than two (2) months following the end of the project.
  7. IASA will issue a research grant on the basis of a written agreement signed by the Secretary-General for the Association.
  8. The recipient will acknowledge IASA in all papers, presentations, and other publications that reference research supported by IASA.
  9. IASA will not pay Research Grants in advance of a project

To apply for a IASA research grant, click here (IASA members only)

Summer Reading Group: Privacy and Confidentiality

SAA’s Privacy and Confidentiality Section has started a summer reading group via Zoom to discuss topics affecting archivists from a privacy and confidentiality perspective. Join colleagues on July 16 at 12 p.m. CT for “Privacy and Protest” to discuss the American Archivist Spring/Summer 2018 article “Ethical Challenges and Current Practices in Activist Social Media Archives” by Ashlyn Velte and how to protect the privacy of protesters without sacrificing the opportunity to preserve the records of social movements.

Podcast: Artifactual Journey

Artifactual Journey

The Artifactual Journey podcast is a discussion about African American artifacts from the Nanny Jack & Co Archives, history, and a lively conversation with a different guest in each episode. The podcast is created and produced by Nanny Jack & Co., an African American heritage consulting firm. Host: Philip J. Merrill; Editor & Producer: Veronica A. Carr; Music Producer: Noah Zafer Sommer.

 

New Issue: Journal of Western Archives

Current Issue: Volume 11, Issue 1 (2020)

Article

Balancing the Art and Science of Archival Processing Metrics and Assessment
Cyndi Shein, Sarah R. Jones, Tammi Kim, and Karla Irwin

Case Studies

Corporate Archives in Silicon Valley: Building and Surviving Amid Constant Change
Paula Jabloner and Anna Mancini

Finding AV Needles in Manuscript Haystacks: Conducting an Audiovisual Assessment/Audit in Manuscript Archives
Benjamin Harry

Review

Review of Reappraisal and Deaccessioning in Archives and Special Collections
Alexis Adkins

Review of Arranging and Describing Archives and Manuscripts
Cory L. Nimer

Message from Library Juice Press

Why we don’t sell ebooks
June 9, 2020 by Rory Litwin

We are often asked if ebook versions of our publications are available. I tell people that they can find most of our books through Proquest, Ebsco, or Odilo, but that with a few exceptions on Amazon, we don’t offer ebooks for retail sale. With this post I would like to explain why, as well as to share a little teaser about a related future announcement.

It would be technically pretty easy to create DRM-free ebooks and sell them without going through a middleman. The problem is the ease of copying DRM-free ebooks to share, which would compromise our sales too much. We don’t bring in much revenue from book sales beyond breaking even, so we can’t afford to do it this way.

DRM-protected ebooks have a few different problems. One problem is that a big portion of our audience is opposed to DRM in principle, and we’d rather not be on the wrong side of that debate. Another problem is that self-hosting DRM-protected books is extremely expensive, beyond our capacity to take on. So we would have to go with a third party, and third party ebook sellers come with issues. They want to control pricing and set prices at much lower levels than we do for print books. They also want to take a bigger cut of sales than print book sellers require. Since printing books is not the most costly part of our operation, producing ebooks wouldn’t save much, so the reduction in revenue from ebook sales would lead to financial unsustainability. Another issue with third party ebook vendors is that they often require users to download their app, in order to capture repeat customers and connect to their DRM systems.

The picture shifts slightly if you only look at our backlist, where most of the books have few sales anyway. So here is what we’re planning. We are working on a “Friends of Library Juice Press” membership program. Among the benefits that members will receive is access to a different monthly ebook–DRM-free–from our backlist. Watch for a full announcement and launch of this program later in the summer.

Litwin Books & Library Juice Press

New/Recent Publications

Books

Archiving People: A Social History of Dutch Archives
Eric Ketelaar
(free ebook, 2020)

Archives and Special Collections as Sites of Contestation
Mary Kanduik
(Litwin Books & Library Juice Press, 2020)

Shadow Archives: The Lifecycles of African American Literature
Jean-Christophe Cloutier
(Columbia University Press, 2019)

The Passion Projects: Modernist Women, Intimate Archives, Unfinished Lives
Melanie Micir
(Princeton University Press, 2019)

Foundations of Information Ethics
Edited by John T F Burgess and Emily J M Knox
(Facet Publishing, 2019)

Trusting Records in the Cloud: The creation, management, and preservation of trustworthy digital content
Edited by Luciana Duranti and Corinne Rogers
(Facet Publishing, 2019)

Do Archives Have Value?
Edited by Michael Moss and David Thomas
(Facet Publishing, 2019)

The No-nonsense Guide to Born-digital Content
Heather Ryan and Walker Sampson
(Facet Publishing, 2019)

Reimagining Historic House Museums: New Approaches and Proven Solutions
Edited by Kenneth C. Turino and Max Van Balgooy
(Rowman & Littlefield/AASLH, 2019)

Copyright for Archivists and Records Managers, 6th edition
Tim Padfield
(Facet Publishing, 2019)

Linked Data for the Perplexed Librarian (An ALCTS Monograph)
Scott Carlson, Cory Lampert, Darnelle Melvin, Anne Washington
(ALA Editions, 2020)

Digital Art through the Looking Glass: New strategies for archiving, collecting and preserving in Digital Humanities
Oliver Grau, Janina Hoth, eveline wandl-vogt
2019

Women’s Labour and the History of the Book in Early Modern England
(Bloomsbury, 2020)

Articles

The Creativity of Digital (Audiovisual) Archives: A Dialogue Between Media Archaeology and Cultural Semiotics,” Theory, Culture & Society. 2019.
Ibrus, I., & Ojamaa, M.

The Study of Key Elements to Establish Natural Disaster Preparedness Plan in Libraries and Archives,” Journal of the Korean BIBLIA Society for Library and Information Science (한국비블리아학회지:한국비블리아) Volume 30 Issue 1, 2019
도서관과 기록관의 자연재난 대비 계획수립 핵심 요소 고찰
Lee, Sangbaek
이상백

The gay archival impulse: the founding of the Gerber/Hart library and archives in Chicago,” Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication 2019
Aiden M. Bettine, Lindsay Kistler Mattock

Other

Internship Program Evaluation
Brooklyn Museum and Citi Foundation

Copyright Education in Libraries, Archives, and Museums: A 21st Century Approach
A Summary Report of Roundtable Discussions at Columbia University

The Law and Accessible Texts: Reconciling Civil Rights and Copyrights, authored by Brandon Butler (UVA), Prue Adler (ARL), and Krista Cox (ARL)