CFP: Provenance

The Society of Georgia Archivists and Provenance editorial board are pleased to announce that they have moved to an open access model for the journal. All issues will be available online as soon as they are ready for publication, removing the one year embargo on content that had previously been in place.We hope this shift will better meet the needs of the profession and provide more timely research and commentary on the topics that matter most to the field. You can read the latest issue or browse earlier publications at: digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/provenance.

Call for Papers

Provenance: The Journal of the Society of Georgia Archivists, a peer reviewed academic publication, seeks articles on archival theory and practice for the 2020 issue. Please note that the content of the journal is not limited to the state of Georgia, and articles of regional or national significance are welcome. First-time authors are especially encouraged to submit articles for consideration. Provenance is also interested in innovative and unique methods for presenting scholarly content. Please contact Heather Oswald if you would like to discuss an article idea or format.

Articles on archival topics outside of theory and practice which meet publication standards will also be considered. Typical papers should be a Word document, 10-20 pages, double spaced, and formatted according to the 17th edition of the Chicago Manual of Style. Please review information for contributors: digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/provenance/policies.html.

Articles are to be submitted utilizing Provenance’s online system: digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/provenance.

For additional information contact Editor Heather Oswald at: provenance@soga.org. Deadline for contributions is July 15, 2020.

Gracy Award 

Each year the SGA awards the Gracy Award, a $350 prize which recognizes a superior contribution to Provenance. Named for David B. Gracy II, founder and first editor of Georgia Archive, the award began in 1990 and is judged by the editorial board.

*Back issues of Provenance and Georgia Archive available online*

Table of Contents for volume 36, issue 1:

Articles

Participatory Archival Research and Development: The Born-Digital Access Initiative
Alison Clemens, Wendy Hagenmaier, Jessica Myerson, and Rachel Appel

Chain of Custody: Access and Control of State Archival Records in Public-Private Partnerships
Sarah Carlson

Case Study

Using Captions and Controlled Vocabulary to Describe Visual Materials as an Alternative to Digitization
Eric Willey

Reviews

Brown, Archival Futures
reviewed by Joshua Kitchens

MarshallThe Complete Guide to Personal Digital Archiving
reviewed by Erin Lawrimore

Ryan and SampsonThe No-Nonsense Guide to Born-Digital Content
reviewed by Pamela Nye

Cohen, Archive That, Comrade! Left Legacies and the Counter Culture of Remembrance
reviewed by Cheryl Oestreicher

Foscarini, MacNeil, Mak, and OliverEngaging with Records and Archives: Histories and Theories
reviewed by Martin T. Olliff

AbramsOral History Theory (Second Edition)
reviewed by Amanda Pellerin

McDadeTorn from Their Bindings: A Story of Art, Science, and the Pillaging of American University Libraries
reviewed by Kay Strahan

——————————
Heather Oswald
Manager of Public Services
Baker Library, Harvard Business School
Somerville MA

Call for Papers | Special Issue of Notes on “Digital Humanities and Music Pedagogy”

This call does not specifically mention archives, but has potential for archivists who work with music collections.

_______________________________

We invite submissions to a special issue of Notes entitled “Digital Humanities and Music Pedagogy” that will explore the current state of thought and practice at the intersections of the digital humanities and social sciences, music information, and graduate, undergraduate, and continuing education in music. The goal of this issue is to better understand the influence of digital methodologies on the formation of music researchers. To that end, we aim to explore current cross-disciplinary work where information specialists, technicians, ethnomusicologists and musicologists, theorists, performers, and composers strive in tandem to construct learning environments in which new questions, different interpretive angles, wider contextual frames, and humanizing influences are brought to the fore in musical study.

We encourage the following types of submission:

  • Short, 2,000 to 4,000 word position papers on the ways in which the methods, techniques, and collaborative infrastructures of the digital humanities and social sciences further pedagogical work in music, in and outside of the academy
  • Research articles of up to 10,000 words exploring case studies, best practices, theoretical approaches, and critically examined experiments in digital methods and forms of presentation with students in music and music librarianship

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Explorations of the implications of the digital humanities and social sciences for the current and future study of music
  • The intersections of the human and the digital in music study, including constructions of personal and social identity along the lines of gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, class, disability, religion, nation, and age
  • Examinations of labor equity, power, and precarity in digital humanities/digital musicological pedagogy
  • (Re)examinations of our approaches to music pedagogy and to the digital at moments of global or local crisis, trauma, and uncertainty, including the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Digital humanities and digital social science in the music classroom as an incubator for student-, librarian-, or faculty-led digital projects
  • Challenges and obstacles to the adoption of digital modes of analysis and presentation among music students, scholars, and librarians, within the library or the academy
  • Digital pedagogical approaches that center student research questions and foster the creation of student communities of practice
  • Critical approaches to the curation, analysis, presentation, and preservation of music data and metadata that excavate and make manifest embedded assumptions and biases
  • Pedagogical explorations of models of music data and of music information systems that reveal the seams of their construction and the tensions of part versus whole

Manuscript submissions are due September 18, 2020. Questions and expressions of interest may be sent to the guest editor, Francesca Giannetti, Digital Humanities Librarian at Rutgers University–New Brunswick, at fg162@rutgers.edu. For details on citations, figures, and formatting, please see “Information for Contributors”.

New Issue: Archival Science

Volume 20, Issue 2, June 2020
(partial open access)

Original Papers

Social media data archives in an API-driven world
Amelia Acker, Adam Kreisberg

Participatory description: decolonizing descriptive methodologies in archives
Lauren Haberstock

Of global reach yet of situated contexts: an examination of the implicit and explicit selection criteria that shape digital archives of historical newspapers
Tessa Hauswedell, Julianne Nyhan, M. H. Beals, Melissa Terras, Emily Bell

Rural archives in China over the past 40 years
Tianjiao Qi

Acknowledging the shadows
Michael Karabinos

 

New Issue: Archivaria

Dear Archival Colleagues,

I am pleased to announce that Archivaria 89 (Spring 2020) is now available online at https://archivaria.ca/. It will also be available on Project Muse within the coming days. The print issue is in production and will be mailed to members and subscribers in the next few weeks. Canada Post is reporting delays to their service and this may affect when members receive their printed copies.

All Archivaria content is currently available to everyone without any restrictions. After June 30, 2020, we will be implementing a new embargo policy, by which access to articles included in the most recent two issues (instead of the last eight issues) is going to be restricted to members and subscribers.

With this issue, you’ll also notice things have changed a bit on our website. In recent weeks, we upgraded the journal to a more responsive, mobile-friendly version of Open Journal Systems (OJS).

A huge thank you to the authors who have contributed to the new issue, to the Archivaria Editorial Team, and to the ACA office staff for all the hard work it takes to put an issue together.

Happy reading!

Fiorella Foscarini, General Editor

Call for Submissions: Sustainability in Libraries

This call does not specifically mention archives, but directly relates to initiatives that archivists are engaged in.

_____________________

Sustainability in Libraries, edited by Rebekkah Smith Aldrich, Monika Antonelli, Adrian Ho, and René Tanner will be published by ALA Editions. The book will offer insights into the important developments on how librarians provide leadership and how libraries serve as models for sustainable practices. The editors are seeking articles from a variety of perspectives on topics related to sustainability-including crisis preparation, response, and recovery-within the library profession.

Objective of the Book:

In 2019, the American Library Association adopted Sustainability as a new core value. This book will provide direction to library personnel and libraries as institutions to position themselves as connectors, conveners, and catalysts for the changes needed. “Sustainability” is not an end point but a mindset, a lens through which operational and outreach decisions can be made. With the climate crisis upon us and its devastating impact on wildlife, oceans, air quality, soil, and the very fabric of life on Earth, we are compelled to find answers and provide direction for our library communities whether they be rural, suburban, metropolitan, schools, or institutions of higher learning. The examples and ideas shared in this edited volume will have far reaching potential and bolster the United Nations’ work on the Sustainable Development Goals, which seek to create a more sustainable future for all.

Suggested Topics:

The book chapters will be divided into three main themes for sustainable action.

Theme #1: Libraries as Inspiration & Catalysts – Content that would fall under this theme include topics and examples related to how libraries may provide leadership and serve as a model for sustainable practices through facility stewardship, innovative service design, and outreach and partnership practices.

Theme #2: Libraries as Conveners & Connectors – Content that would fall under this theme include topics and examples related to how libraries work collaboratively through visionary partnerships to facilitate collective impact work to address existing challenges and opportunities with a focus on community well-being and self-reliance.

Theme #3: Libraries as Contributors to Community Resilience – Content that would fall under this theme includes topics and examples of how libraries contribute to future community resilience. For example, active participation in library-centric or community-based resilience/disaster preparedness, response, and recovery efforts and work that contributes to creating a culture of respect, understanding, and empathy in the library’s service area.

Target Audience:

The intended audience for this book is people working in public, school, academic, special, rural, and urban libraries. In addition, this book will include instructional materials to be used in Library and Information Science programs to educate future library practitioners about Sustainability, the newest Core Value of Librarianship.

Special Considerations:

High quality, large file, professional, black and white images are encouraged to enhance the text. Unless they are public domain or openly licensed for commercial use, a permission release will be required for each image submitted. A model release form will be necessary for any images with recognizable people in them. The person must be a legal adult or have a parent’s permission to use the image.

Submission Guidelines:

The editors welcome submissions from authors who are interested or have experience creating sustainable libraries or working on topics of sustainability in connection with libraries. The editors are open to a variety of submissions including research articles, how-to articles, essays, and interviews. Manuscript submissions should comply with APA Style.

The editors are looking for submissions about sustainability in libraries that emphasize scalable approaches that can be applied to a variety of libraries at different levels. Brief proposals about programs and partnerships that provide inspiration and actionable takeaways are encouraged. Submit a summary of your proposed article (300 words or less) to Sustainability in Libraries.

The development of manuscripts will be done in phases. After comments are returned to authors regarding accepted chapter summary proposals, a chapter outline (500 words or less) will be requested.

Once authors receive acceptance for their chapters they will submit their final manuscripts in .doc or .docx format.  Suggested length is 2,000 to 3,500 words.  Manuscripts should comply with APA style guidelines.

Timeline:

  • Chapter Summary Proposal deadline:  June 15, 2020
  • Notification by editors of proposal acceptance: July 15, 2020
  • Chapter Outlines deadline:  August 17, 2020
  • First Manuscript Drafts deadline: October 1, 2020
  • Additional key dates will be sent to successful proposal writers.

Submit chapter summary proposals to: forms.gle/axqBoa1c9LAa6GQF6

For additional information, please contact:

Adrian Ho, Director of Digital Scholarship, University of Kentucky, hoadriank[at]gmail[dot]com, or

Rene Tanner, Liaison Librarian, Humanities Division, Arizona State University, rene.tanner[at]asu[dot]edu.

2019 SAA Research Forum Proceedings Now Online

2019 SAA Research Forum

9:00-9:30 AM: Opening and Session 1

Welcome and Overview – Research Forum Program Committee  [Slides]

Dispatches from the Front: Findings from the Virtual Footlocker Project Phase 1 – Edward Benoit, III and Roxanne Guidry [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

9:30-10:00 AM: Session 2: Archives and Education

Developing a Framework to Enable Collaboration in Computational Archival Science Education – Richard Marciano [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Gauging Student Perspectives: Using Survey Data to Understand Student Perceptions of Archives – Suzanne Noruschat and Giao Luong Baker [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

Supporting and Sustaining Digital Curation Education with BitCuratorEdu – Jessica Farrell and Christopher Lee [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

10:00-10:30 AM: Break

10:30-11:00 AM: Session 3: Archives in Practice

“No ideal place for [special collections and archives]:” Administrator and user viewpoints on archives existing in libraries – Ashley Todd-Diaz [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Sorry, this Video Does Not Exist: Curating the Digital Documentary – Heather Barnes [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Conscious editing of archival description at UNC-Chapel Hill – Jackie Dean [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

11:00-11:30 AM: Session 4: Lightning Talks

Using CIRCA for Special Collections: A Scalable Solution – Gwynn Thayer and Eli Brown [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

What’s In the Box? Collection Exploration and Instruction – Nathalie Proulx and Kristen Korfitzen [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

Expedited digital appraisal for regular archivists:  an MPLP type approach for hybrid collections – Susanne Belovari [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Radical Collaboration between Computer Science and Archival Science to Educate Next Generation Archivists – Jane Zhang [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

11:30 AM-Noon: Session 5: Radical Collaboration [Abstract/Bios]

Overview and an Archivist’s Example – Nance McGovern [Slides]

Example: Working with Data and Archives – Heather Soyka [Remarks]

Example: The Evolving Role of University Archivists – Kari Smith [Slides]

Noon-1:30 PM: Lunch

1:30-2:00 PM: Session 6: Scaling Practice

Digitization for Everybody (Dig4E): Bridging the Gap between Standards and Practice – Paul Conway [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

By the People, with the people: User-center crowdsourcing at the Library of Congress – Lauren Algee [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Scalability and process: A national survey of inventory practices within archives – Patrice-Andre Prud’homme and JJ Compton [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

2:00-3:00 PM: Poster Session (see list of posters)

3:00-3:30 PM: Break [and extra time for posters]

3:30-4:00 PM: Session 7: Digital Practice

Centralized Born-Digital Processing at Wilson Special Collections Library – Jessica Venlet [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Social Media Data Preservation in an API-driven World – Amelia Acker [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Computer-Assisted Appraisal of Email: RATOM – Christopher Lee [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

4:00-4:30 PM: Session 8: SAA’s CORDA

Framing Research as Evaluation and Assessment: Introducing CORDA – Paul Conway and Jennifer Gunter King [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

4:30-5:00 PM: Session 9 and Closing 

At a Crossroads: Archival Description, Aggregation, and the Next 20 Years – Jodi Allison-Bunnell [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Closing: Looking Ahead – Research Forum Program Committee  [Slides]

Posters (in alphabetical order)

A Collaborative Effort to Plan a Digital Preservation Program at a Small Library – Laura Bell and Fatemeh Rezaei [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

 American Samoa’s Government Archives – James Himphill [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Appraising Professional Networks – Cory Nimer [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Are Academic Archives Championing EDI Initiatives in Digital Collections Metadata Practices? – Jessica Serrao [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Campus Archives in the Shadow of Campus Sexual Assault – Ana Roeschley and Jessica Holden [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Creating Competencies for Audiovisual Archiving Education and Professional Development – Karen Gracy [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Electronic Health Records and Electronic Health Archives: An Archival Examination of the ISO Health Informatics Standards – He Yang and Xuenan Zhang [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Empowering the Archivist: Progress Report on “Applying Intelligent Agents to Digital Preservation Research Programme” – Paul Severn [Abstract/Bio] [Poster forthcoming]

Exhibits of Archives in Japan – Yayoi Tsutsui [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

How do levels of description affect discoverability of the Web Archives at the Library of Congress? – Carlyn Osborn [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Integrated Organization: Processing 500 feet of special collection materials in under 18 months – Donica Martin and Angela Solis [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Signatures as identity tool: implications for name authority work in historical collections and beyond – Ashlea Green [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Turning A Challenge into Education: MA Museum Administration Students Undertake a Real-Life Collections Management Project – Alyse Hennig [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Peer-Reviewed Research Papers

Developing a Framework to Enable Collaboration in Computational Archival Science Education – Richard Marciano, Gregory Jansen, and William Underwood [Paper]

Macro-appraisal and Professional Communities – Cory L. Nimer [Paper]

A Research Study of Inventory Practices in Archives in the United States: Scalability and Process – Patrice-Andre Prud’homme and JJ Compton [Paper]