Workshops: Developing a Curriculum to Advance Library-Based Publishing

Register for Pilot Workshops at the 2018 DLF Forum
The Library Publishing Coalition and the Educopia Institute, in collaboration with the Digital Library Federation (DLF), are excited to host a pair of in-person workshops at the 2018 DLF Forum based on the IMLS-funded Developing a Curriculum to Advance Library-Based Publishing project. Both full-day workshops will take place on Sunday, October 14 (the day before the Forum) at the M Resort just outside of Las Vegas, NV. Each workshop is limited to 20 participants, to be selected through a brief application process.

While the workshops are affiliated with and will complement the DLF Forum, please note that you do not have to attend the Forum to participate in the workshops. See below for workshop descriptions, scholarship information, and application instructions.

Note: These workshops are based on the Content and Sustainability modules of the Library Publishing Curriculum released in Spring 2018. Learn more about the release!

Apply to attend a workshop and/or for a diversity scholarship  (deadline August 24)

Description
Library Publishing Curriculum: Content
The Content Workshop (based on the Content Module) covers how library publishers attract, select, edit, manage, and disseminate content. It includes information about how to recruit partners and select content for a program, and how to incorporate diverse voices into each part of the publication process. It also shares information about common production workflows, identifying the resources and staff skills needed to support various editorial strategies and content types.

Instructor: Matt Ruen, Grand Valley State University

Library Publishing Curriculum: Sustainability 
The Sustainability workshop (based on the Sustainability Module) will focus on how library publishing endeavors can establish longevity and find long-term success. Attendees will learn how to build support with key stakeholders and communities, both internally (library staff) and externally (e.g., University Press), and how to undertake digital preservation to prolong the lifespan of digital publications.

Instructor: Lisa Schiff, California Digital Library

Diversity Scholarships
We are delighted to be able to offer three scholarships for workshop attendees, aimed at ensuring a diverse group of participants. Each scholarship consists of up to $1,000 in reimbursement against allowable travel expenses incurred for workshop attendance (determined according to U.S. federal guidelines, as this is funded through a federal grant). The scholarship application deadline is August 24, 2018, and applicants will be notified by September 7, 2018.

How to Apply
If you are interested in applying for the workshop and/or for a diversity scholarship, please fill out the application form. The application deadline is August 24, 2018 and applicants will be notified by September 7, 2018.
Please note that the application will ask for:

  • A brief applicant bio
  • A brief personal statement that addresses how attendance at the workshop will benefit the participant
  • Diversity characteristics (diversity scholarship applicants only)

Contact
Email hannah@educopia.org with questions.

The IMLS-funded Developing a Curriculum to Advance Library-Based Publishing project is running a series of pilot workshops, and these two DLF workshops are one opportunity of many. For a full list of events, including virtual and physical workshop opportunities, please see: https://educopia.org/deliverables/library-publishing-curriculum-pilot-experiences

CFP: Gender issues in Library and Information Science: Focusing on Visual Aspects

Guest Editor, Dr. Lesley S. J. Farmer

Description

Gender issues are capturing people’s attentions these days. One aspect of such attention is visual. How does the visual aspect of gender impact LIS? Possible gendered subtopics include, among others:

  • Cataloging visual resources
  • Visual literacy
  • Picture books
  • Media literacy visual aspects
  • Visual fake news and LIS: information professionals’ roles
  • Image editing: process, discernment, implications
  • Historical aspects (e.g., visually “reading” and interpreting historical documents with a gender frame)
  • Primary sources
  • LIS instruction
  • Visual implications for persons with visual impairments

How to Submit

Authors are kindly invited to register at our paper processing system at: http://www.editorialmanager.com/opis/ and submit their contribution.

Every manuscript should be clearly marked as intended for this special issue. All papers will go through the Open Information Science’s high standards, quick, fair and comprehensive peer-review procedure. Instructions for authors are available here. In case of any questions, please contact Guest Editor (Lesley.Farmer@csulb.edu) or Managing Editor (katarzyna.grzegorek@degruyteropen.com).

As an author of Open Information Science you will benefit from:

  • transparent, comprehensive and fast peer review managed by our esteemed Guest Editor;
  • efficient route to fast-track publication and full advantage of De Gruyter e-technology;
  • no publication fees;
  • free language assistance for authors from non-English speaking regions.

The deadline is September 1.

New Issue: Digital Humanities Quarterly

2018 12.2

Articles
Manuscript Study in Digital Spaces: The State of the Field and New Ways Forward
Bridget Almas, The Alpheios Project, Ltd.; Emad Khazraee, School of Information, Kent State University; Matthew Thomas Miller, Roshan Institute for Persian Studies, University of Maryland College Park; Joshua Westgard, University Libraries, University of Maryland College Park

BigDIVA and Networked Browsing: A Case for Generous Interfacing and Joyous Searching
Joel Schneier, North Carolina State University; Timothy Stinson, North Carolina State University; Matthew Davis, McMaster University

Predicting the Past
Tobias Blanke, King’s College London, Department of Digital Humanities

Reverse Engineering the First Humanities Computing Center
Steven Jones, University of South Florida

Issues in Digital Humanities
Methodological Nearness and the Question of Computational Literature
Michael Marcinkowski, Bath Spa University

Author Biographies

CFP: The Reading Room: A Journal of Special Collections

http://readingroom.lib.buffalo.edu/readingroom/

About the Journal
The Reading Room: A Journal of Special Collections is a scholarly journal committed to providing current research and relevant discussion of practices in a special collections library setting. The Reading Room seeks submissions from practitioners and students involved with working in special collections in museums, historical societies, corporate environments, public libraries and academic libraries. Topics may include exhibits, outreach, mentorship, donor relations, teaching, reference, technical and metadata skills, social media, “Lone Arrangers”, management and digital humanities. The journal features single-blind, peer-reviewed research articles and case studies related to all aspects of current special collections work.

CFP: Information & Culture: A Journal of History

http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions

Submissions
Information & Culture: A Journal of History welcomes submissions of research articles. Authors may submit a complete manuscript or may contact the editor with a proposal. You are encouraged to consult the journal’s home page, which gives an overview of the material published in Information & Culture.

Prospective authors should familiarize themselves with the broad topics covered by the journal (found on the about page) as well as the submission requirements and the peer review process. We expect authors to submit completed articles following all guidelines below. Papers that do not follow these guidelines will not be accepted for review. Please note, we do not accept papers that are currently under consideration for publication with another journal.

Content Requirements

  • Interpretive. Good history is about interpretation. Each article must have a historical thesis that is bolstered by an appropriate line of argument and credible evidence that is appropriately cited. Papers are expected to follow the methods of high-quality academic historical scholarship. Articles that are merely descriptive will not be accepted for publication.
  • Information History. All articles must be primarily historical in nature and primarily about information. If the relevance of information to the manuscript theme is not immediately clear, the author should add text as necessary to clarify the relationship, and to place the submission in a larger body of scholarship.
  • Language. Should be written in Standard English. Word choice should be precise and syntax should be clear. Articles written in a language other than grammatically correct English at a high academic level will not be considered.

Manuscript Requirements

  • Manuscript. Articles should typically range from 6,000-10,000 words. Longer articles will be considered in the context of whether the topic and treatment merits the extra length, and whether the journal has the space. Shorter articles may also be considered under certain circumstances.
  • Abstract. The article’s abstract should be no longer than 100 words and should be independent from the body of the article. Care should be taken to craft a clear and compelling abstract. Authors should bear in mind that the abstract is the first thing that the reader and any potential reviewers will see.
  • Keywords. Authors are encouraged to provide three to five keywords that capture the manuscript’s salient points. Keywords should be listed on a separate line on the title page.
  • Reviewers. Authors should submit, along with the manuscript, the names of at least two potential reviewers with expertise in the topic.
  • Endnotes. All citations should be provided as endnotes. Endnotes should be placed in a Notes section following the body of the manuscript. For a sentence with citations, there should be only one callout for all references cited within that sentence, and with few exceptions, that callout should be placed at the end of the sentence. Endnotes must be formatted electronically in MS Word and conform to “Humanities Style” in The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition. Notes should include all bibliographic information required by that style.
  • Acknowledgments. Acknowledgments are not required, but when included, should appear at the beginning of the Notes as an unnumbered endnote
  • Cover Sheet. Include a seperate page with article title, author name, mailing address, phone number, fax number, email address, and a 50-word biographical statement. For blind review purposes, do not include personal or institutional information on any page of the manuscript itself, including the abstract.

Manuscript Format

  • MS Word document in Times New Roman 12-point font
  • Text should follow The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition
  • All text should be one and a half spaced, including headings, long quotations, endnotes, and captions
  • One-inch margins on all sides
  • Page numbers in the upper right margin
  • All copy aligned left; do not justify
  • Paragraphs indented five spaces (0.25”) with a single tab
  • An extra line of space should be inserted above and below extracts, subheads, and figure/table/image callouts, but not between paragraphs
  • One space only after each period at the end of a sentence
  • Include first name and/or initial(s) of all persons when referred to in the manuscript for the first time
  • Spell out the title of an organization when first referenced, with acronym in parentheses. Acronyms may be used in all subsequent references
  • Tables should be submitted as separate MS Word files

Photos and Illustrations

  • Permissions are required for all published images. Should the article be accepted for publication, it is the responsibility of the author to obtain official written permission to reprint an image from the copyright holder or owner, including preferred wording for crediting the source of the image. Any cost involved is the responsibility of the author.
  • Figure captions should always include a source attribution and a statement of permission to use the image. Images obtained at no cost should attribute the source “Courtesy of…” while permissions obtained for a fee should state the source and “Used by permission.”
  • All images (photos, maps, or illustrations) to be included with a manuscript should be noted in the cover letter.
  • Images should be submitted as separate files (one file per image). Images submitted in Word documents are not acceptable.
  • Each image file should be at least 300 dpi at the size at which it is to be published.
  • Grayscale images in TIFF format are preferred, but most standard formats will be accepted.
  • Figure callouts should be placed in the manuscript on a separate line as Figure X Here, or similar text.
  • Figure captions should be placed at the end of the manuscript, after the Notes section.
  • The editor will make the final determination as to which images, if any, will be published.

Special Notes and Recommendations:
Non-native English speakers preparing a manuscript for submission to Information & Culture may wish to utilize one of the many professional English language editing services that specialize in academic journal manuscript preparation. Clearly written manuscripts help editorial staff and peer reviewers better evaluate the paper for its content, reducing the time required for the review process and resulting in a more competitive submission overall.

Please note, however, that the use of editing services is at the author’s own expense and does not guarantee that the article will be selected for peer review or accepted for publication in Information & Culture.

Submission Procedure
Once the manuscript meets the guidelines above, please submit via email to iceditor@ischool.utexas.edu.

SAA Events on Writing and Publishing

‘Tis that time of year again! SAA is fast approaching and here are the opportunities to participate in their events related to writing and publishing.

Every year, I go to the Write Away Forum, toast to authors, and spend time in the bookstore. I like to hang out with others interested in writing and publishing. I cannot emphasize enough how participating in these can lead to opportunities. It is because of conversations I had at the Write Away Forum back in 2011 that began my involvement in SAA publishing.

So don’t be shy – if you have an idea for a book or article, want to get involved, or just wanting to find out more about the processes, go to these events and ask questions. All the SAA staff and editors are wonderful people to talk to. And if you see me – come say hi, I’d love to chat!

“What Does That Mean? Building SAA’s New Dictionary” Forum (Thursday, 7:30 am) – Shared language helps to define a community. Get the latest word on the forthcoming Dictionary of Archives Terminology and tweet new terms at #SAAwords.

“Write Away!” Forum (Friday, 7:30 am) – Write for SAA! Learn how to contribute content to American Archivist, Reviews Portal, Archival Outlook, case studies, blogs, and books, and ask questions of editors and staff.

Brown Bag Lunch Discussions (Friday, 12:30 pm) – Two options: Be among the first to read and chat about the forthcoming American Archivist article, “‘Be Damned Pushy at Times’: The Committee on the Status for Women and Feminism in the Archival Profession, 1972–1998” OR dive into the One Book, One Profession selection Perspectives on Women’s Archives. RSVP Abigail Christian at achristian@archivists.org.

Toast to SAA Authors (Thursday, 2:45-3:15) – Hoist a glass of lemonade to those who have written for SAA publications—journal, magazine, books, modules, case studies, literature and resource reviews—in the past year.

And of course don’t forget to stop at the bookstore!