Call for Book Chapters: Academic and Public Libraries

I am seeking chapter proposals for a new edited collection tentatively titled “Changing Roles, Changing Times: Essays on Academic and Public Librarians’ Responsibilities in an Era of Change”, to be published by McFarland & Company.

The monograph’s purpose is to examine the impact of technology on librarians’ position duties and responsibilities.  This evolution is leading to the creation of new positions and the restructuring of old positions in order to meet the increasing demands technology is placing on the profession.  The impact of technology is significantly revising the look of librarianship in the academic and public spheres.  Librarians from all levels are impacted from the newly-hired librarian to the seasoned, veteran manager.

This work seeks to capture the experiences, thoughts, and opinions of librarians whose new roles are transforming their working relationships with faculty and students and related communities. Librarians working in academic and public libraries have valuable experiences to share with the library community. The entire library community will benefit from reading and applying the experiences and knowledge shared by a group of library leaders.

Please submit a proposal of 250-500 words for consideration.

Topics may include, but not limited to:

Digital Services:

Big Data Analytics
Collaborations with constituents such as students and local communities
Data Curation and Preservation
Data Management (e.g. data management plans)
Data Science
Data Visualization
Digital Humanities
Discovery search services
Social Media
Virtual Reality

“Open” Activities:

Creative Commons Licensing
Institutional Repositories
Intellectual Property (patents, trademarks, copyright)
Open Access (e.g., monographs, journals, open educational resources)
Scholarly Communications

By February 8, 2019, please email your chapter proposals to:

Tom Diamond, editor
Louisiana State University
notted@lsu.edu

Thanks,
Tom Diamond
Louisiana State University

SAA Short Fiction Contest Announces Winner

“It isn’t stealing if no one cares about it anymore,” says the protagonist of “Quarantine,”Jeanne Kramer-Smyth’s winning entry in SAA’s 2018 Archives Short Fiction Contest.

Sponsored by the Publications Board, the contest garnered 30 entries, all of which had to feature an archives, an archivist, or archival materials. The jury unanimously chose Kramer-Smyth’s submission as the winning entry, based on its gripping story, excellent writing, and prominent discussion of preserving and retrieving electronic records. Set in the future during a global epidemic, an archivist, researcher, and donor work together to find vital information that may put an end to the disease. The jury noted that “this story, accessible to archivists and non-archivists alike, points to the vital importance of ensuring long-term access to born-digital information.”

In addition, the jury awarded honorable mentions to three other stories: “Risk Versus Benefit” by Nancy Freeman, “Ester Jones Diaz” by Rebekah McFarland, and “יצחק דזשאַעקק, אַ חשבו (Yitzchak Jaeck, An Account)” by Michelle Sayers.

Congratulations to Jeanne, Nancy, Rebekah, and Michelle, and thank you to everyone who participated!

New Issue: Records Management Journal

Volume 28 Issue 3, 2018

Recordkeeping and disaster management in public sector institutions in Ghana
Catherine Asamoah, Harry Akussah, Adams Musah

Implementation of the Court Records Management System in the delivery of justice at the Gaborone Magisterial District, Botswana
Tshepho Lydia Mosweu, Lekoko Kenosi

Status of EDRMS implementation in the public sector in Namibia and Zimbabwe
Cathrine Tambudzai Nengomasha, Alfred Chikomba

Medical record keeping systems in Malawi: Is there a case for hybrid systems and intermediate technologies?
Alistair George Tough, Paul Lihoma

Institutional and regulatory constraints in managing procurement records: Exploratory case of procuring entities in Tanzania
Bakari Maligwa Mohamed , Geraldine Arbogast Rasheli , Leonada Rafael Mwagike

Records management practice in support of governance in the county governments of Kenya, a case of Nyamira County
Rodger Osebe , Jane Maina , Kibiwott Kurgat

The adoption of ISO standards in Brazil, Iberian Peninsula and United Kingdom in information and documentation: A comparative study
Natália Marinho do Nascimento , María Manuela Moro Cabero , Marta Lígia Pomim Valentim

New Issue: Archival Science

Volume 18, Issue 4, December 2018

Political party archives: the system of recording and conveying information in local structures of the communist party in Poland ‘s Biała Podlaska province, from 1975 to 1989
Dariusz Magier

Genre, co-research and document work: the FIAT workers’ enquiry of 1960–1961
Steve Wright

Sustainability of independent community archives in China: a case study
Zhiying Lian, Gillian Oliver

The Dutch comptoir as information centre
Eric Ketelaar

New Issue: Information & Culture

Special Double Issue: Volume 53, Number 3 & 4 (October/November 2018)
(subscription)

Bourgeois Specialists and Red Professionals in 1920s Soviet Archival Development
Kelly A. Kolar
Immediately after the 1917 October Revolution the Bolsheviks began developing the most centralized archival system in the world, along with a new profession of “red archivists.” However, the development of archives and the archival profession in 1920s Soviet Union was not simply the top-down implementation of Bolshevik political ambitions portrayed in offi cial Soviet accounts and Cold War–era Western literature but an unexpectedly open negotiation of ideas and customs among actors with diverse professional and ideological backgrounds, including non-Marxist archival professionals, workers from other cultural professions, and young communists.

The Weather Privateers: Meteorology and Commercial Satellite Data
Gemma Cirac-Claveras
This article examines the changing framework for producing satellite weather data in the United States since the 2000s, from a government function to one increasingly carried out by the private sector. It explores the controversial attempts to commercialize the production of a particular data source (atmospheric profiles obtained with radio occultation)from the perspective of executives of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), members of Congress, atmospheric and climate scientists, and the private sector. It addresses their opposing arguments by focusing, in particular, on the stresses and pressures within NOAA and its resistance to acquiring such data from commercial providers. In so doing, the article discusses the connections between commercial activities and meteorology and, more generally, the relations between science and commerce.

Parallel Expansions: The Role of Information during the Formative Years of the English East India Company (1600–1623)
Gabor Szommer
This article examines the role of information in the early years of the English East India Company (EIC). It examines diff erent aspects of the organizational behavior of the EIC between the years 1600 and 1623 and shows the interplay between physical expansion and the transformation of information-handling practices from several perspectives. Although the focus is on a single organization, this case study provides insights into the informational challenges faced by early modern tradingcompanies and similar organizations coordinating operations on a global scale.-public.

Codebooks for the Mind: Dictionary Index Reforms in Republican China, 1912–1937
Ulug Kuzuoglu
Faster access to information was an overwhelming concern for Chinese reformists during the Republican era (1912–1949). They claimed that the nonalphabetical nature of Chinese characters presented obstacles to indexing, a fundamental technology for effi cient information access and retrieval. In a matter of three decades, nearly one hundred new indices were invented for Chinese characters. Competition over which indices would prevail was fierce, especially among dictionary publishers, which stood to benefi t greatly in the nascent Chinese dictionary market. This article follows the two main publishing houses in China, Commercial Press and Zhonghua Press, that invented indices in order to dominate the market from the founding of the repub -lic in 1912 to the start of the war against Japan in 1937. As dozens of inventors of indices made clear, however, indexing technologies were situated within a larger social context, and the invention and destruction of indices were sites of political and fi nancial contestation.

Book Reviews:
A Note from the Senior Book Review Editor
Amelia Acker

Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing by Marie Hicks (review)
Megan Finn

Atari Age: The Emergence of Video Games in America by Michael Z. Newman (review)
Roderic Crooks

The Economization of Life by Michelle Murphy (review)
Marika Cifor
p. 374-376

A Mind at Play: How Claude Shannon Invented the Information Age by Jimmy Soni, Rob Goodman (review)
Edward A. Goedeken

This issue of Information & Culture is now available on Project Muse.

New Book Series: The Routledge Studies in Archives

The Routledge Studies in Archives series publishes new and cutting-edge research in records and archives studies. Recognising the imperative for record-keeping work in support of memory, social justice, technical systems, legal rights and historical understanding, this series extends the disciplinary boundaries of archival studies. It sees the archival in personal, economic and political activity, historically and digitally situated cultures, subcultures and movements, technological and infrastructural developments and in many other places.

Routledge Studies in Archives brings scholarship from diverse academic and cultural traditions into conversation and presents the work of emerging and established scholars, side by side. It promotes the exploration of the intellectual history of archival science, the internationalisation of archival discourse and the building of new archival theory.

The Series Editor invites proposals for books that offer original thinking about archives and records. If you have an idea for a book that you think would be appropriate for the series, then please contact the Series Editor, James Lowry (jlowry@liverpool.ac.uk), to discuss further.