2017 Publications Mander Jones Awards Recipients announced

2017 Publications Mander Jones Awards Recipients

Congratulations to the 2017 Publications Mander Jones Award recipients who were presented with an Award or Commendation certificate and Judges’ Comments at the 2018 National Conference Welcome Reception, held in Perth today.

Recipients

Category 1B:    Frank Upward, Barbara Reed, Gillian Oliver, and Joanne Evans, Recordkeeping Informatics for a Networked Age

Category 2A:    The Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Tjungunutja: From Having Come Together

Category 2B:    Joanna Sassoon, Agents of Empire: How E L Mitchell’s photographs shaped Australia

Category 4:    Melbourne Diocesan Historical Commission, Melbourne Diocesan Historical Commission (MDHC) Summary of & Index to The Advocate 1868-1990 (48 volumes)

Category 5:    Greg Rolan, ‘Towards interoperable recordkeeping systems: A meta-model for recordkeeping metadata’, in Records Management Journal, 27(2)

Category 6:    Lachlan Glanville, ‘Reading Germaine Greer’s Mail’, in The Conversation, Australian edition, 24 March 2017

Category 8:    ArchivesACT, ArchivesACT’s Find of the Month, Archives.act.gov.au. (2018). Previous find of the month – ArchivesACT. [online]

Commendations

Category 1B:    James Lowry (ed.), Displaced Archives

Category 2A:     World War 1 Writers Group, Ku-ring-gai Historical Society Inc., Rallying the Troops: A World War 1 Commemoration (Volume III)

Category 5:    Luke Scholes, ‘Unmasking the myth: the emergence of Papunya painting’, published in Tjungunutja: From Having Come Together.

Category 6:    Fiona Ross, ‘Humane and intimate, how the Red Cross helped families trace the fates of WW2 soldiers’, published in The Conversation, Australian edition, 11 May 2017

CFP: The International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI)–Special Issue on Engaging Disability: Social Science Perspectives on Information and Inclusion

Call for Papers: The International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI)–Special Issue
“Engaging Disability: Social Science Perspectives on Information and Inclusion”

The International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI) invites submissions for a special issue focused on social scientific perspectives on information and disability inclusion and empowerment. We welcome full research papers that make a novel contribution to this area of research; this may be empirical, theory-based, methodological, and/or practical in nature, and we encourage international perspectives and collaborations. We will also have a special section for student work, works in progress, opinion pieces, and professional reports.

Extended abstracts of up to 1,000 words for full research papers and up to 500 words for contributions to the special section are due by 31 October 2018. Authors will be notified of acceptance in mid-November, and final papers will be due by 1 March 2019.
We seek submissions from different disciplines and perspectives for this special issue of IJIDI. The goal of this special issue is to bring together researchers who focus specifically on Engaging Disability. Topics and themes related to disability and information access may include, but will not be limited to:

  • Physical, intellectual, and socio-cultural barriers and supports related to disability, information access, and inclusion
  • Analysis of international information policy considerations of disability
  • Hidden/invisible/latent disability
  • Engaging and including disability in libraries, museums, archives, and other information organizations
  • Disability and employment in LIS
  • Disability and higher education in LIS
  • Faculty and librarians with disabilities: Is technology inclusive or exclusive?
  • Accessibility and usability (broadly conceived)
  • Children and youth with disabilities in the context of information concepts
  • Intersectionality and disability: Exploring multiple identities
  • The disability culture: Information and technology issues

Kim M. Thompson of the University of South Carolina will be guest editor for this issue, which is scheduled for publication in October 2019. Please contact KimThompson@sc.edu should you have any questions about this call. IJIDI Author Guidelines are available at: http://publish.lib.umd.edu/IJIDI/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Schedule: Call for Papers: October 2018
Extended Abstracts due: 31 October 2018 (with notification of acceptance by mid-November 2018)
Accepted Papers due: 1 March 2019
Peer Review: March 2019
Revised Papers due: 1 July 2019
Publication: October 2019 (issue 4)

Call for Applicants: Bibliographical Society of America Fellowship Program

Each year, the Bibliographical Society of America funds a number of fellowships designed to promote bibliographical inquiry and research.  Supported projects may range chronologically from clay tablets and papyrus rolls to contemporary literary texts and born-digital materials. Topics relating to books and manuscripts in any field and of any period are eligible for consideration as long as they include analysis of the physical object – that is, the handwritten, printed, or other textual artifact – as historical evidence.

Applications are due on December 1, 2018.

For a complete list of fellowships and for application procedures, please visit:

https://bibsocamer.org/awards/fellowships/

Massachusetts Historical Society Research Fellowships

The first of our deadlines, for MHS-NEH support, is January 15, 2019!

The Massachusetts Historical Society will offer more than forty research fellowships for the academic year 2019-2020.

MHS-NEH Long-term Fellowships are made possible by the National Endowment for the Humanities; the Society will offer at least two awards in 2019-2020. (See our ad in the H-Net Jobs Guide or visit our website for details.) The stipend, governed by an NEH formula, is $4,200 per month for a minimum of four months and a maximum of twelve months. The Society adds a monthly supplement, payable directly to the MHS-NEH Fellow, of $562.50. These fellowships are for researchers who have already completed the terminal degree in their fields (typically a Ph.D.).

DEADLINE: JAN. 15, 2019

MHS Short-term Fellowships carry a stipend of $2,000 to support four or more weeks of research in the Society’s collections. See the MHS website for details on these fellowships; we will offer more than twenty short-term fellowships in 2019-2020!

DEADLINE: MAR. 1, 2019

The Boston Athenaeum and the MHS will offer one Suzanne and Caleb Loring Fellowship on the Civil War, its Origins, and Consequences for at least four weeks of research at each institution. This fellowship carries a stipend of $4,000.

DEADLINE: FEB. 15, 2019

The Society also participates in the New England Regional Fellowship Consortium of twenty-seven organizations. These grants provide a stipend of $5,000 for a total of eight or more weeks of research conducted at three or more participating institutions. Visit www.nerfc.org to learn more about the member organizations and start planning your itinerary!

DEADLINE: FEB. 1, 2019

For more information, please visit www.masshist.org/research/fellowships, email fellowships@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0577. Follow us on Twitter @MHS_Research for reminders regarding fellowship deadlines and information on all of our other activities.

CFP: Rethinking The Collector and the Collected: Perspectives on Decolonizing Area Studies Librarianship

This call is for academic librarians, and though it doesn’t specifically mention archives, the topic is relevant.

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Library Juice Press

We are inviting chapter proposals for the upcoming Library Juice Press publication tentatively titled Rethinking The Collector and the Collected: Perspectives on Decolonizing Area Studies Librarianship. This volume will explore the paradigm of “area studies” — a way of supporting regionally-focused collecting, processing, and liaison work — in the academic library through an explicitly anti-colonial lens. We will center debates on the politics and problems of area studies in libraries. Specifically, we ask how libraries are rethinking their approaches to collecting global resources and serving our constituencies in a contemporary and progressive manner. While libraries need to address the problematic nature of area studies, we see a larger academic trend in the push for “global” initiatives which ignore historically, linguistically, and culturally significant sites of difference, inequity, and asymmetrical power relations.

What does it mean to break down the artificial divide between “collectors” of knowledge and those of us who have these knowledges “collected” for use? What work is required to decolonize collections, collecting practices, and practices of access originally designed to help Euro-American scholars study “the other?”

Possible focuses for chapters include, but are not limited to:
– negotiating areas: the politics and history of delineating regions, places, and spaces;
– interdisciplinarity: exploring boundaries and relationships among academic disciplines and other interdisciplinary subjects such as women and gender studies, LGBT or queer studies, or environmental studies;
– funding and neoliberal history: looking at the relationship to governments, private funding, private capital, and the support of imperial and capitalist projects;
– collection development, acquisitions, and access: examining historical and current practices of acquiring materials and denying, limiting, or expanding the use of these materials through copyright, paywalls, or open access regimes;
– identity, professionalism, and training for library workers: centering the lived experiences of library workers, particularly librarians abroad, immigrants, and individuals from diaspora communities.

Accepted essays will offer a nuanced critique with solutions that go well beyond an erasure of difference. We are especially interested in soliciting chapters from writers of color, indigenous writers, or scholars from outside of the U.S. We also invite new translations of previously published work currently unavailable in English. Further, we invite work which operates from the assumption that hegemonic areas should be studied using the same tools, theories, and approaches as non-hegemonic areas — much like the precedents of whiteness studies and masculinity studies. Lastly, we plan to integrate peer review among authors into our process in addition to editorial review and ask that potential authors be willing to provide feedback on at least one fellow author’s material during the editing process.

Proposals should be no more than 300 words and describe the chapter, the framing and structure of the chapter and/or any theoretical frames necessary to the piece. Further, please indicate if the chapter would fit into any of the above focuses. If proposed work is a translation, please indicate if you are the original author or have the original author’s permission and provide the citation for the original. Please send proposal as a .docx attachment and in the body of the e-mail along with your CV and a short biography. Our deadline for proposals is December 15, 2018.

Please e-mail the editors at DecolonizingAreaStudies@gmail.com with any questions about the book including procedural questions or to ask about potential fit for your proposal.

New Issue: SLIS Connecting Special Issue: British Studies

Volume 7, Issue 1 (2018) SLIS Connecting Special Issue: British Studies

Columns
Director’s Report
USM School of Library and Information Science

Spotlights: Faculty, Alumnus, and Courses
USM School of Library and Information Science

From the GAs: Congratulations, Publications, Presentations
USM School of Library and Information Science

Student Associations: News and Events
USM School of Library and Information Science

Remembering a Visit to the World’s Oldest Carnegie Library
Matthew R. Griffis

British Studies Interview
Martha Attridge Bufton and Teresa S. Welsh

Historic Pubs of London, Oxford, Edinburgh
Teresa S. Welsh MLIS, Ph.D.

Articles
The Feminist Library: “History is Herstory, Too”
Lauren B. Dodd

Through the Lens: World War I Photography as Historical Record
Kimberly Holifield

Documenting the British East India Company and their Involvement in the East Indian Slave Trade
Bonnie Pinkston

“Eminently Combustible” — Charles Williams, the Most Interesting Inkling
Clay Waters

Writing for Public Audiences: A 2-week online workshop beginning October 15, 2018

This is different from what I usually post, but because archives get attention in the news, this might be an interesting opportunity.

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How to Pitch and Submit is a 2-week, blog-based course aimed at helping academics and graduate students reach wider audiences with their work. The course, created by former English professor and Belt Press publisher Anne Trubek, focuses on developing story ideas, pitching and submitting articles, op-eds, and essays. Students in the course have published  in The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times, Chronicle of Higher Education, LitHub, Washington Post, McSweeneys, Atlas Obscura, Smithsonian, The Wall Street Journal, ScientificAmerican.com, Guernica, Mental Floss, Tablet, The Awl, and many other outlets. In October, the course, taught by historians Daniela Blei and Andrea Volpe, will include Q & As with editors from The AtlanticSmithsonian.com, and Mosaic Science, along with Q and As with academics who are now writing fulltime for public audiences. Course runs October 15-29. Cost is $300.

Contact Info:
Andrea Volpe
Contact Email: andrealvolpe@gmail.com
URL: https://thinkingwriter.org/how-to-pitch-submit/