CFP: Labor in Academic Libraries – Special Issues of Library Trends

CFP: Library Trends Special Issue

Guest Editors
Emily Drabinski, Long Island University, Brooklyn
Aliqae Geraci, Cornell University
Roxanne Shirazi, The Graduate Center, CUNY

Special Issue Theme​

Labor in Academic Libraries

Description

The topic of labor in academic libraries has emerged as an area of critical interest in both academic library and archives communities. Library workers have long been at the center of labor struggles in higher education. Additionally, librarians and archivists have worked against the relative invisibility of their work within an academy that centers the concerns of disciplinary faculty who often see knowledge workers as adjunct to the scholarly enterprise. We believe the time is right for a collection of essays that can frame the work of librarians, archivists, and library workers within the broader workplace issues of the university.

We invite contributions in the form of qualitative and quantitative research, analytic essays, and historical explorations that address the broad range of issues facing information workers in the academic setting. Potential essays and articles within this theme might address the following:

  • the impact of unions in academic libraries, social justice unionism, relationship between union activists and progressive/left circles in librarianship
  •  university library leadership and participation in shared governance models
  • discussions of hierarchies, divisions, and power dynamics between and among library workers
  • affective labor and its value in academic libraries
  •  corporatization of the university and libraries
  • the growth of contract, part-time, contingent, and student labor in library staffing models
  • labor side of educational technology and the adoption of corporate platforms
  • the pitfalls of pipeline and residency programs as a strategy for diversifying professions
  • revisiting debates around faculty status and tenure for librarians
  • the implications for full time labor of casualization–for workers and the profession as a whole
  • faculty and academic worker organizing
  • the roles of librarians and archivists as scholars and knowledge workers in the academy
  • the changing structures and relationships in the higher education workplace

Contact the editors at academiclibrarylabor@gmail.com.

Timeline:
Abstracts and proposals (no more than 500 words): July 1, 2018
Notification: July 15, 2018
Initial drafts due: October 15, 2018

CFP: Radical Empathy in Archival Practice (JCLIS special issue)

In their 2016 article From Human Rights to Feminist Ethics: Radical Empathy in the Archives, Michelle Caswell and Marika Cifor define radical empathy as “a willingness to be affected, to be shaped by another’s experience, without blurring the lines between the self and the other.” Incorporating a feminist ethics approach that centers lived experiences that fall out of the “official” archival record, Caswell and Cifor identify archivists as caregivers whose responsibilities are not primarily bound to records but to records creators, subjects, users, and communities through “a web of mutual affective responsibility.”

In a profession that has staunchly held onto myths of its own neutrality, objectivity, and dissociation of the subjective and personal, centering concepts of the body and affect critically engages archives’ and archivists’ complicity in perpetuating inequality. Recent and intersecting conversations in the archival field about feminism, queerness, race, anti-racism, contingent labor practices, peer-mentorship, and decentralizing whiteness in the profession, all relate to the concept of radical empathy in practice.

We invite authors from a variety of career experiences and archival practices (students, early career professionals, and colleagues working in community archives, public libraries, museums, non-profits, corporations, etc.) to contribute to this special issue of the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies. This issue will provide an extended exploration of “how an archival ethics of care can be enacted in real world environments.” It will explicitly focus on case studies, in particular case studies that engage feminist theory and frameworks, relating to the lived experiences of practicing archivists.

Suggested questions and topics include (but are not limited to):
– Whose bodies do we speak of in a profession whose majority makeup represents privileged bodies that are white, cis-gender, conforming to oppressive definitions and standards of ability, and have access to institutional or personal monetary resources? Whose bodies are erased or occluded in the profession?
– Archival description project audits that re-examine language in legacy finding aids.
– Affective documentation of underrepresented communities in archives.
– Managing grief and trauma with record creators, donors, subjects, users, communities, and in archival collections. What are the roles of the archivist?
– Building team competence through peer-mentorship and networks of skill and knowledge sharing.
– Critical examination of contingent labor and employment practices.
– Managing emotional labor in systemically oppressive work environments through affective relationship building (vis-a-vis manager or peer relationships).
– Exploration of access and security models that critically engage users and communities outside of academia (i.e. alternatives to the “panopticon”).
– Inclusion and recognition of archival labor and interventions in description.
– Measuring affective response as an evaluation method to archival instruction.

Deadline for Submission: January 30, 2019

TYPES OF SUBMISSIONS

JCLIS welcomes the following types of submissions:

Research Articles (no more than 7,000 words)
Perspective Essays (no more than 5,000 words)
Literature Reviews (no more than 7,000 words)
Interviews (no more than 5,000 words)
Book or Exhibition Reviews (no more than 1,200 words)
Research articles and literature reviews are subject to peer review by two referees. Perspective essays are subject to peer review by one referee. Interviews and book or exhibition reviews are subject to review by the issue editor(s).

CONTACTS

Guest Editors

Please direct questions to the guest editors for the issue:
– Elvia Arroyo-Ramirez, University of California, Irvine: elvia.ar@uci.edu
– Jasmine Jones, University of California, Los Angeles: jjones@library.ucla.edu
– Shannon O’Neill, Barnard College: soneill@barnard.edu
– Holly Smith, Spelman College: hsmith12@spelman.edu

Journal Editors

Managing Editor: Andrew J Lau
Associate Editor: Emily Drabinski
Associate Editor: Rory Litwin

THE JOURNAL OF CRITICAL LIBRARY AND INFORMATION STUDIES

The mission of the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies is to serve as a peer-reviewed platform for critical discourse in and around library and information studies from across the disciplines. This includes but is not limited to research on the political economy of information, information institutions such as libraries, archives, and museums, reflections on professional contexts and practices, questioning current paradigms and academic trends, questioning the terms of information science, exploring methodological issues in the context of the field, and otherwise enriching and broadening the scope of library and information studies by applying diverse critical and trans-disciplinary perspectives. Recognizing library and information studies as a diverse, cross-disciplinary field reflective of the scholarly community’s diverse range of interests, theories, and methods, JCLIS aims to showcase innovative research that queries and critiques current paradigms in theory and practice through perspectives that originate from across the humanities and social sciences.

Each issue is themed around a particular topic or set of topics and features a guest editor (or guest editors) who will work with the managing editor to shape the issue’s theme and develop an associated call for papers. Issue editors will assist in the shepherding of manuscripts through the review and preparation processes, are encouraged to widely solicit potential contributions, and work with authors in scoping their respective works appropriately.

JCLIS is open access in publication, politics, and philosophy. In a world where paywalls are the norm for access to scholarly research, the Journal recognizes that removal of barriers to accessing information is key to the production and sharing of knowledge. Authors retain copyright of manuscripts published in JCLIS, generally with a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license. If an article is republished after initially publication in JCLIS, the republished article should indicate that it was first published by JCLIS.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS

The Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies welcomes submissions from senior and junior faculty, students, activists, and practitioners working in areas of research and practice at the intersection of critical theory and library and information studies.

Authors retain the copyright to material they publish in the JCLIS, but the Journal cannot re-publish material that has previously been published elsewhere. The journal also cannot accept manuscripts that have been simultaneously submitted to another outlet for possible publication.

CITATION STYLE

JCLIS uses the Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition as the official citation style for manuscripts published by the journal. All manuscripts should employ the Notes and Bibliography style (as footnotes with a bibliography), and should conform to the guidelines as described in the Manual.

SUBMISSION PROCESS

Authors interested in contributing to this special issue should submit manuscripts through JCLIS’ online submission system by January 30, 2019. This online submission process requires that manuscripts be submitted in separate stages in order to ensure the anonymity of the review process and to enable appropriate formatting.

Abstracts (500 words or less) should be submitted in plain text and should not include information identifying the author(s) or their institutional affiliations. With the exception of book reviews, an abstract must accompany all manuscript submissions before they are reviewed for publication.
The main text of the manuscript must be submitted as a stand-alone file (in Microsoft Word or RTF)) without a title page, abstract, page numbers, or other headers or footers. The title, abstract, and author information should be submitted through the submission platform.

CFP: Gender issues in Library and Information Science: Focusing on Visual Aspects

GUEST EDITOR
Dr. Lesley S. J. Farmer

DESCRIPTION
Gender issues are capturing people’s attentions these days. One aspect of such attention is visual. How does the visual aspect of gender impact LIS? Possible gendered subtopics include, among others:

Cataloging visual resources
Visual literacy
Picture books
Media literacy visual aspects
Visual fake news and LIS: information professionals’ roles
Image editing: process, discernment, implications
Historical aspects (e.g., visually “reading” and interpreting historical documents with a gender frame)
Primary sources
LIS instruction
Visual implications for persons with visual impairments

HOW TO SUBMIT
Authors are kindly invited to register at our paper processing system at: http://www.editorialmanager.com/opis/ and submit their contribution.

Every manuscript should be clearly marked as intended for this special issue. All papers will go through the Open Information Science’s high standards, quick, fair and comprehensive peer-review procedure. Instructions for authors are available here. In case of any questions, please contact Guest Editor (Lesley.Farmer@csulb.edu) or Managing Editor (katarzyna.grzegorek@degruyteropen.com).

As an author of Open Information Science you will benefit from: transparent, comprehensive and fast peer review managed by our esteemed Guest Editor; efficient route to fast-track publication and full advantage of De Gruyter e-technology; no publication fees; free language assistance for authors from non-English speaking regions.
The deadline is September 1.

CFP: Teaching and Research with Archives (Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy)

The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, a peer-reviewed open-access academic journal, is now open for submissions for its special 14th issue on Teaching and Research with Archives, with a deadline of June 15, 2018. This issue will be co-edited by Jojo Karlin, (CUNY Graduate Center), Stephen Klein, (Digital Service Librarian, CUNY Graduate Center), and Danica Savonick (CUNY Graduate Center).

Digital technologies have prompted renewed attention to archival research and teaching practices, creating new opportunities for engaging primary sources, while also raising ethical questions about how archives are created, organized, shared, accessed, and preserved.

For this themed issue, JITP seeks scholarly work exploring how archival technologies and methodologies influence teaching, learning, and research. How do scholars locate authoritative information and guarantee continued access in the current media landscape? How do we teach undergraduate students best methods for performing archival research and evaluating sources presented digitally? Other topics can include, but are not exclusive to:

  • the use of digital technologies and techniques to facilitate archival research and construction
  • pedagogies of archival research in the undergraduate classroom
  • collaborations among faculty, archivists, and students
  • explorations of access, equity, sustainability, integration, and preservation
  • relationships among archives, institutions, and publics
  • the ethics of archival research methods
  • the place of archives (public, academic, digital)
  • material intersections of administration, preservation, and dissemination

We invite and encourage both textual and multimedia (please see these guidelines) submissions employing interdisciplinary and creative approaches in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences. Besides scholarly papers, the submissions can consist of audio or visual presentations and interviews, dialogues, or conversations; creative/artistic works; manifestos; or other scholarly materials.

All work appearing in JITP is reviewed by the issue editors and independently by two scholars in the field who provide formative feedback to the author(s) during the review process. We practice signed, as opposed to blind, peer review. We intend that the journal itself—both in our process and in our digital product—serve as an opportunity to reveal, reflect on, and revise academic publication and classroom practices.

As a courtesy to our reviewers, we will not consider simultaneous submissions, but we will do our best to reply to you within three months of the submission deadline. The expected length for finished manuscripts is under 5,000 words. All work should be original and previously unpublished. Essays or presentations posted on a personal blog may be accepted, provided they are substantially revised; please contact us with any questions at editors@jitpedagogy.org.

The submission deadline for full manuscripts is June 15, 2018.

Call for Papers: Miriam Braverman Memorial Prize

The MIRIAM BRAVERMAN MEMORIAL PRIZE, a presentation of the Progressive Librarians Guild (PLG), is awarded each year for the best paper about an aspect of the social responsibilities of librarians, libraries, or librarianship. Papers related to archivists, archives, and archival work are also eligible.

The winning paper will be published in a forthcoming issue of Progressive Librarian. The winner of the contest will also receive a $500 stipend to help offset the cost of travel to and from the American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference. The award will be presented at the annual PLG dinner at ALA, and the winner is invited to present their paper at the PLG meeting. In addition, the winner will be provided a press pass for the conference, allowing for free entry to sessions and the exhibition floor, with the expectation that they will write a short reflection for publication by PLG.

Requirements

1. Contestants must be library and/or information science students attending a graduate-level program in the United States or Canada. Contestants may not have finished their coursework earlier than December 2017.

2. Entries must be the original, unpublished work of the contestant, and must be written in English. Entries may not exceed 3,000 words, and must conform to MLA in-text citation style.

3. To facilitate the blind review process, each entry must include a cover sheet providing the contestant’s name, full contact information (address, phone number, e-mail address), name of the institution where the contestant is enrolled, and the title of the paper. No identifying information, other than the title, should appear on the paper itself.

4. Entries must be submitted electronically, in PDF format, to bravermansubmissions@gmail.com. Entries must be received no later than 5:00 p.m. CST on international workers’ day, or May Day, May 1, 2018.

5. The $500 stipend is available only to help defray the cost of ALA conference attendance in the winning year; if the winner of the contest is unable to attend, the money will remain in the Braverman Prize endowment fund and may be donated to an information and communication technology social justice-related NGO at the discretion of the selection committee.

Any questions regarding the contest or the selection process can be directed to the chairs of the selection committee, Julene Jones (Julene.Jones@uky.edu) and Madeline Veitch (veitchm@newpaltz.edu).

More information about Miriam Braverman and about the Progressive Librarians Guild is available at http://progressivelibrariansguild.org/.

CFP: “Imagining the future academic library collection” – Special Issue of Collection Management

Though primarily about library collections, the call specifically asks about the role of special collections.

________________________________________________________________________________________

Collection Management will be publishing a special issue of the journal dedicated to “Imagining the Future Academic Library Collection” together with guest editor Michael Levine-Clark, Dean of Libraries, University of Denver.

For most of our history, academic librarians have built collections. We’ve acquired the resources that we felt would serve our students and faculty, and by so doing, we’ve created collections meant to last. That terminology – “collection building” – implies permanence, and perhaps inflexibility. But the way we think about collections is changing: we often rely on access rather than ownership, we are deaccessioning large portions of our legacy print collections to make way for service points and study spaces, and we recognize that we must develop far more inclusive collections than we did in the past.

Almost twenty years into the twenty-first century, the bulk of most materials budgets is dedicated to electronic resources, and through negotiation of big deals and use of models such as demand-driven acquisition, most of us have access to far more content than was ever possible at the end of the last century. Most of us have come to rely on consortial partners when we negotiate with vendors, and we work collaboratively through partnerships like the Western Regional Storage Trust (WEST) or the Eastern Academic Scholars Trust (EAST) to plan for the future of our print collections. We have resources and strategies available to us that allow us to think differently, but our collection development models are not radically different than they were in the past.

Thinking about the future of academic libraries, what will our collections look like? Will academic libraries continue to build collections, or will we simply provide access to content? Will collections reside within the library or will they be retrieved from some other location? Will collection management be replaced by metadata management? In a world with greater homogeneity of collections (because we all have access to so much more), what is the role of special collections? Will open access change the way we manage library collections and library budgets? How do we work together to ensure the broadest range of material is preserved into the future while also making sure we have the best collections possible at our local institutions? How do we collect the ephemera of the digital age – digital objects, websites, emails, etc? If we continue to emphasize collecting published scholarly resources, how do we add things such as data sets, streaming media, and as-yet unimagined new resources? And how do we make sure that we don’t perpetuate the mistakes of the past by mainly collecting dominant voices?

Based on existing developments in librarianship, higher education, or elsewhere, what do you see as key trends in the future of academic library collections? What do you think will happen? What do you hope will happen? We are soliciting peer-reviewed articles, commentaries and case studies for a special issue of Collection Management to be published in 2019 on “Imagining the Future Academic Library Collection.”

Please submit an abstract (200-500 words) by May 15, 2018 to sclement@unm.edu and jnixon@purdue.edu  that describes your vision for the future and outlines how you will approach the topic. Indicate whether you are interested in writing a commentary, peer-reviewed article or a case study.

Susanne Clement and Judy Nixon

Co-editors, Collection Management

CFP: “Palestinian Libraries and Archives Under Israeli Rule” – Theme issue of Progressive Librarian

Call for Papers
Theme issue of Progressive Librarian
“Palestinian Libraries and Archives Under Israeli Rule”

The publication Progressive Librarian: A Journal for Critical Studies and Progressive Politics in Librarianship invites Palestinian information providers to submit papers for a special issue, “Palestinian Libraries and Archives Under Israeli Rule.” Papers accepted for this special issue may also be republished later in a book on this topic.

Submitters and Topics
We are seeking papers from Palestinian information providers, including: librarians, archivists, library staff, publishers, researchers, book dealers, and book store owners and employees. We are especially interested in papers in the following three areas:

Historical or analytical studies of how the occupation or a particular Israeli policy has made it difficult to provide information. For example, a paper might discuss the history of the confiscation of Palestinian archives, the history of the destruction of Palestinian libraries, restrictions on the import of books from “enemy states”, restrictions on the import of books dealing with the Palestinian/Israeli conflict, internet restrictions, restrictions on access by Palestinians to materials in Israeli libraries and archives, the effect of curfews and travel restrictions on access to information, or limitations on professional collaboration due to travel restrictions.

Papers describing the experiences of the author or authors in confronting these problems. For example, papers might describe difficulties experienced by an information provider or providers, or explain how an information provider or providers creatively dealt with some of these challenges. We encourage the submission of even very short papers of this type.

Papers describing current efforts to create libraries and archives. Papers in this topic could describe different case studies of library and archive projects that document the experiences and histories of Palestinian life, culture and history.

Submission Details
Papers may be submitted in either English or Arabic. Papers submitted in Arabic will be translated into English. To submit a paper for consideration, please send an abstract of up to 200 words to the guest editors of this special issue of Progressive Librarian (Walid Habbas, Jessa Lingel andTom Twiss) at  progressive.librarian@protonmail.com by May 30. Notifications of acceptance will go out on June 30. Papers can be shorter (between 500 and 2000 words) or full-length research papers (of 5,000 to 8,000 words). Final versions of short papers will be due September 30, and longer papers will be due December 31. Please do not hesitate to reach out to editors with questions or inquiries.

About the Journal
Progressive Librarian is an American journal published by the Progressive Librarians Guild. It provides a forum for critical perspectives in Library and Information Science (LIS), featuring articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.