CFP: The Ideabook of Positive Change in the Library Workplace

This does not specifically mention archives, but the issues are pertinent and applicable.

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Call for papers and essays

http://bit.ly/2NZ7NMQ

Working Title: The Ideabook of Positive Change in the Library Workplace
Editors: Heather Seibert, Amanda Vinogradov, Amanda H. McLellan – East Carolina University, Joyner Library.
Deadline for drafts: September 5, 2018
Publisher: American Library Association Press (ALA Press)
Submission Form: https://goo.gl/forms/wny3vqnKvRRsLVxz1

We are soliciting a diverse range of essays and narratives from practicing U.S. academic, public and special libraries staff, for inclusion in a curated anthology that empowers library employees to change real-world issues pertaining to library staff. Submissions may include any phase of project development, but we are especially seeking: perspectives and advice on how to make and implement change, how to talk to administration about needs, the specific steps taken in the process, solutions to roadblocks and recognition of the future needs of staff. We also seek narratives, steps and ideas from administrators on how to implement and create a positive work environment and the challenges faced in this process.  Paraprofessional staff and first-time authors are encouraged to apply.

Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Lactation accommodation
  • Flexible scheduling
  • Development of policies and procedures allowing remote work (i.e. weather related absences for employees with leave time deficits)
  • Childcare accommodations
  • Changing tables in restrooms
  • Parental leave policies
  • Space and time for dialysis or other medical needs
  • Standing desks
  • Promotion of exercise at work
  • Inclusive ideas for work outings, gatherings or meetings
  • Veterans on active duty or return from duty
  • Race and ethnicity inclusion and sensitivity
  • Gender neutral bathrooms
  • Dealing with bias
  • Providing space for prayer and/or meditation
  • Inclusive recruitment practices
  • Updating policies to be more inclusive
  • Development of policies and space for employees with varying sensory needs (Autism spectrum, PTSD, etc)
  • Case studies of libraries that have successfully handled difficult situations regarding discrimination or harassment.
  • Employees returning to school for further education

Timeline

Deadline for Draft Submission: September 5, 2018
Notification/Feedback regarding submission: October 10, 2018
Final submission for accepted drafts: Jan. 12, 2019

Submissions:

*This anthology will contain commentary, narratives and experiences.  Drafts accepted must be between four to six pages double spaced (about 350 words per page).  A suggested template will be provided for all accepted submissions to the anthology.

*Materials cannot be previously published or simultaneously submitted.

*All photos, illustrations, graphs etc. must have a Creative Commons License or be in the public domain. The submission’s author is responsible for verifying that these materials fall under the respected licenses. Each will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis and will be at the discretion of the editors for inclusion.

*If your submission is tentatively accepted, we may request modifications.

*Accepted contributors should expect to sign a release form in order to be published, and will agree to follow submission guidelines.

We STRONGLY encourage submission from all regardless of classification of positions within academic and public libraries. We are seeking input from administrators, faculty, as well as staff employees.

Submission Formhttps://goo.gl/forms/wny3vqnKvRRsLVxz1

Thank you

Heather Seibert, Amanda Vinogradov & Amanda H. McLellan

CFP: Gender issues in Library and Information Science: Focusing on Visual Aspects

Guest Editor, Dr. Lesley S. J. Farmer

Description

Gender issues are capturing people’s attentions these days. One aspect of such attention is visual. How does the visual aspect of gender impact LIS? Possible gendered subtopics include, among others:

  • Cataloging visual resources
  • Visual literacy
  • Picture books
  • Media literacy visual aspects
  • Visual fake news and LIS: information professionals’ roles
  • Image editing: process, discernment, implications
  • Historical aspects (e.g., visually “reading” and interpreting historical documents with a gender frame)
  • Primary sources
  • LIS instruction
  • Visual implications for persons with visual impairments

How to Submit

Authors are kindly invited to register at our paper processing system at: http://www.editorialmanager.com/opis/ and submit their contribution.

Every manuscript should be clearly marked as intended for this special issue. All papers will go through the Open Information Science’s high standards, quick, fair and comprehensive peer-review procedure. Instructions for authors are available here. In case of any questions, please contact Guest Editor (Lesley.Farmer@csulb.edu) or Managing Editor (katarzyna.grzegorek@degruyteropen.com).

As an author of Open Information Science you will benefit from:

  • transparent, comprehensive and fast peer review managed by our esteemed Guest Editor;
  • efficient route to fast-track publication and full advantage of De Gruyter e-technology;
  • no publication fees;
  • free language assistance for authors from non-English speaking regions.

The deadline is September 1.

CFP: Strange Circulations: Affect and the Library – A Special Issue of Library Trends

Guest Editors
Kate Adler, Metropolitan College of New York
Lisa Sloniowski, York University

Nature and Scope of Proposed Topic

From the unspoken emotional depth of our conversations at the reference desk, to the ambient politics of our spaces, to our engagement with public memory and knowledge production, affect fundamentally undergirds everyday life in the library. The editors of this special issue contend that the theoretical framework afforded by the “affective turn” can provide a sharp tool and generative language for naming, attending to and interrogating so much of what is alive beneath the surface in our work.

The attempt to theorize affect however, has proven a confusing project. Perhaps the first problem is that the concept itself is hard to define. In a special issue of Archival Science on the subject, Marika Cifor suggests that the affective turn represents more than just making affects, emotions and feelings legitimate objects of scholarly inquiry. …  At their core, definitions of affect understand it as a force that creates a relationship (conscious or otherwise) between a body (individual or collective) and the world (10).

She goes on to argue that affect is a socially, culturally and historically constructed category. As a theoretical framework, affect, she says, can provide a space to think about the interrelations between the psychic, the body and the social (10). Affective forces are crucial to our sense of place in the world, and affect is key to to the ways in which power is “constituted, circulated and mobilized”(Cifor 10).

Archives were a logical starting point for theorizing affect in the broad context of LIS. The emotional complexity of memory, of nostalgia, and history are pronounced in the archive. Libraries, however, remain under-theorized in the literature. This issue of Library Trends extends this new form of cultural criticism to libraries and library workers specifically. Working with Cifor’s definition, we might ask: how are libraries and librarians also attached to, or caught inside, affective forces?  Libraries are (often) more open and chaotic places than are archives. The web of affect in a library, therefore, has different stakes than in archives. Affect provides a lens on so much that is invisible – white supremacy, politics of gender and sexuality, complex class  dynamics, invisible labor, collective fantasies of knowledge and order – and making space to explore it can perform useful work in our field, bringing to the fore that which is sometimes obscured in our day to day practice and professional discourse.

More broadly, in “Strange Circulations: Affect and the Library,” we also hope to make a new intervention in wider interdisciplinary conversations regarding the affective register of myriad nodes of work, life and knowledge production.

List of Potential Articles

The following is a list of possible themes that we hope might provoke writers to share their work with us. Our hope is that authors tie a clearly articulated theory of affect to a vision of librarianship, particularly one that doesn’t lose sight of the material and historical consequences of our work. This list is not meant to be exhaustive or prescriptive. Ideally we would have a range of articles across most fields and sectors of librarianship.

  • Affective encounters with students, patrons, or faculty
  • Affective networks in digital librarianship and digital libraries
  • Memory and library collections: decolonizing, indigenizing, queering
  • Censorship/Filtering debates and the affect of moral panic
  • Radical cataloging as affective labour
  • Bibliographic space and the organizing of affect
  • Affective flow and the architecture and design of libraries.
  • Creating community space
  • Intimacy and aesthetics of embodiment in the library
  • Librarianship and emotional labor
  • Affects of trauma: homeless patrons, overdosing patrons, abandoned children, library anxiety, sexual assaults in libraries
  • Public service and the ethics of care work
  • Affect in narratives of the “future of the library”
  • Affective professional attachments: library neutrality, neoliberalism, neo-utilitarianism
  • Affective fantasies of libraries: libraries as symbols, librarian stereotypes and subjectivities,  imaginary libraries
  • Affects of subversion and transgression, rebellion, revolution, resistance, reading
  • Affect, libraries, & theoretical engagements: Queer, Critical Disability Studies, Critical Race Studies, Anti-Colonialism, Feminism, Political Economy

List of Possible Formats

  • Scholarly/research articles – theoretically informed analyses, historical explorations, and/or articles based in qualitative or mixed research methods
  • Photographic essays – (black and white only)
  • Book reviews/interviews/oral histories/roundtable reports

The editors are open to considering other formats although we have a preference for those listed above. If you have an idea for another format feel free to contact the editors to discuss. Complete articles are expected to be in the 4,000-10,000 word range. More information about the stylistic guidelines can be found here: Author Instructions for the Preparation of Articles

Proposal Requirements

Abstracts and proposals should be no more than 500 words. Please include a brief author biography with contact details as well.

Contact the editors at strangecirculations@gmail.com

Timeline

  • Proposals due: September 1st, 2018.
  • Notification: October 1st, 2018
  • First Draft due: January 7th 2019.
  • Expected Publication Date: Winter 2020

Works Cited

Cifor, Marika. “Affecting Relations: Introducing Affect Theory to Archival Discourse.” Archival Science, vol. 16, no. 1, Mar. 2016, pp. 7–31. link.springer.com, doi:10.1007/s10502-015-9261-5.

https://www.press.jhu.edu/cfp-strange-circulations-affect-and-library

CFP: Code4Lib Journal (C4LJ)

Though not specifically about archives, the call is very broad and archives topics are applicable.

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The Code4Lib Journal (C4LJ) exists to foster community and share information among those interested in the intersection of libraries, technology, and the future.

We are now accepting proposals for publication in our 42nd issue.  Don’t miss out on this opportunity to share your ideas and experiences. To be included in the 42nd issue, which is scheduled for publication in early November, 2018, please submit proposals to http://journal.code4lib.org/submit-proposal by Friday,  August 3, 2018.  The editorial committee will review all proposals and notify those accepted by Friday, August 10, 2018.  Please note that submissions are subject to rejection or postponement at any point in the publication process as determined by the Code4Lib Journal’s editorial committee.

C4LJ encourages creativity and flexibility, and the editors welcome submissions across a broad variety of topics that support the mission of the journal. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Practical applications of library technology (both actual and hypothetical)
  • Technology projects (failed, successful, or proposed), including how they were done and challenges faced
  • Case studies
  • Best practices
  • Reviews
  • Comparisons of third party software or libraries
  • Analyses of library metadata for use with technology
  • Project management and communication within the library environment
  • Assessment and user studies

C4LJ strives to promote professional communication by minimizing the barriers to publication. While articles should be of a high quality, they need not follow any formal structure. Writers should aim for the middle ground between blog posts and articles in traditional refereed journals. Where appropriate, we encourage authors to submit code samples, algorithms, and pseudo-code. For more information, visit C4LJ’s Article Guidelines or browse articles from the earlier issues published on our website: http://journal.code4lib.org.
Send in a submission. Your peers would like to hear what you are doing.

Andrew Darby, Coordinating Editor for Issue 42
Code4Lib Journal Editorial Committee

CFP: Critical Librarianship and Library Management

This call does not specifically mention archives, but the topics are applicable.

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Call for proposals

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Critical Librarianship and Library Management
Publication due 2020

Series Editor: Samantha Hines, Peninsula College
Volume Editor: David Ketchum, University of Oregon

The critical librarianship movement has shone light on many aspects of our profession and encouraged us to question why we do things the way we do them. One area underexplored in this moment, however, is library management: Are there management practices that need to be questioned or interrogated? Are there progressive practices that have not received the recognition they deserve?

ALAO seeks submissions for the “Critical Librarianship and Library Management” volume that delve beyond examples and case studies to critically examine library management.

Proposals in the following areas would be of particular interest:
Implicit bias and library management/operations
Retention and hiring for diversity and inclusion
Social justice in library leadership and management
This will be the first volume of Advances in Library Administration and Organization (ALAO) to publish in 2020.

About the Advances in Library Administration and Organization series:

ALAO offers long-form research, comprehensive discussions of theoretical developments, and in-depth accounts of evidence-based practice in library administration and organization. The series answers the questions, “How have libraries been managed, and how should they be managed?” It goes beyond a platform for the sharing of research to provide a venue for dialogue across issues in a way that traditional peer reviewed journals cannot. Through this series, practitioners glean new approaches in challenging times and collaborate on the exploration of scholarly solutions to professional quandaries.

How to submit:

We are currently seeking proposals for the 2019 volume on Critical Librarianship and Library Management. If you are interested in contributing to this volume, please send a proposal including a draft abstract of 500 words or less, author details and estimated length of final submission to Samantha Hines at shines@pencol.edu by August 31, 2018.

Submission deadlines:

Submission deadline for proposals: August 31, 2018
Notification of acceptance sent by: October 31, 2018
Submission deadline for full chapters: February 28, 2019
Comments returned to authors: April 30, 2019
Submission deadline for chapter revisions: June 15, 2019

CFP: Labor in Academic Libraries – Special Issues of Library Trends

CFP: Library Trends Special Issue

Guest Editors
Emily Drabinski, Long Island University, Brooklyn
Aliqae Geraci, Cornell University
Roxanne Shirazi, The Graduate Center, CUNY

Special Issue Theme​

Labor in Academic Libraries

Description

The topic of labor in academic libraries has emerged as an area of critical interest in both academic library and archives communities. Library workers have long been at the center of labor struggles in higher education. Additionally, librarians and archivists have worked against the relative invisibility of their work within an academy that centers the concerns of disciplinary faculty who often see knowledge workers as adjunct to the scholarly enterprise. We believe the time is right for a collection of essays that can frame the work of librarians, archivists, and library workers within the broader workplace issues of the university.

We invite contributions in the form of qualitative and quantitative research, analytic essays, and historical explorations that address the broad range of issues facing information workers in the academic setting. Potential essays and articles within this theme might address the following:

  • the impact of unions in academic libraries, social justice unionism, relationship between union activists and progressive/left circles in librarianship
  •  university library leadership and participation in shared governance models
  • discussions of hierarchies, divisions, and power dynamics between and among library workers
  • affective labor and its value in academic libraries
  •  corporatization of the university and libraries
  • the growth of contract, part-time, contingent, and student labor in library staffing models
  • labor side of educational technology and the adoption of corporate platforms
  • the pitfalls of pipeline and residency programs as a strategy for diversifying professions
  • revisiting debates around faculty status and tenure for librarians
  • the implications for full time labor of casualization–for workers and the profession as a whole
  • faculty and academic worker organizing
  • the roles of librarians and archivists as scholars and knowledge workers in the academy
  • the changing structures and relationships in the higher education workplace

Contact the editors at academiclibrarylabor@gmail.com.

Timeline:
Abstracts and proposals (no more than 500 words): July 1, 2018
Notification: July 15, 2018
Initial drafts due: October 15, 2018

CFP: Radical Empathy in Archival Practice (JCLIS special issue)

In their 2016 article From Human Rights to Feminist Ethics: Radical Empathy in the Archives, Michelle Caswell and Marika Cifor define radical empathy as “a willingness to be affected, to be shaped by another’s experience, without blurring the lines between the self and the other.” Incorporating a feminist ethics approach that centers lived experiences that fall out of the “official” archival record, Caswell and Cifor identify archivists as caregivers whose responsibilities are not primarily bound to records but to records creators, subjects, users, and communities through “a web of mutual affective responsibility.”

In a profession that has staunchly held onto myths of its own neutrality, objectivity, and dissociation of the subjective and personal, centering concepts of the body and affect critically engages archives’ and archivists’ complicity in perpetuating inequality. Recent and intersecting conversations in the archival field about feminism, queerness, race, anti-racism, contingent labor practices, peer-mentorship, and decentralizing whiteness in the profession, all relate to the concept of radical empathy in practice.

We invite authors from a variety of career experiences and archival practices (students, early career professionals, and colleagues working in community archives, public libraries, museums, non-profits, corporations, etc.) to contribute to this special issue of the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies. This issue will provide an extended exploration of “how an archival ethics of care can be enacted in real world environments.” It will explicitly focus on case studies, in particular case studies that engage feminist theory and frameworks, relating to the lived experiences of practicing archivists.

Suggested questions and topics include (but are not limited to):
– Whose bodies do we speak of in a profession whose majority makeup represents privileged bodies that are white, cis-gender, conforming to oppressive definitions and standards of ability, and have access to institutional or personal monetary resources? Whose bodies are erased or occluded in the profession?
– Archival description project audits that re-examine language in legacy finding aids.
– Affective documentation of underrepresented communities in archives.
– Managing grief and trauma with record creators, donors, subjects, users, communities, and in archival collections. What are the roles of the archivist?
– Building team competence through peer-mentorship and networks of skill and knowledge sharing.
– Critical examination of contingent labor and employment practices.
– Managing emotional labor in systemically oppressive work environments through affective relationship building (vis-a-vis manager or peer relationships).
– Exploration of access and security models that critically engage users and communities outside of academia (i.e. alternatives to the “panopticon”).
– Inclusion and recognition of archival labor and interventions in description.
– Measuring affective response as an evaluation method to archival instruction.

Deadline for Submission: January 30, 2019

TYPES OF SUBMISSIONS

JCLIS welcomes the following types of submissions:

Research Articles (no more than 7,000 words)
Perspective Essays (no more than 5,000 words)
Literature Reviews (no more than 7,000 words)
Interviews (no more than 5,000 words)
Book or Exhibition Reviews (no more than 1,200 words)
Research articles and literature reviews are subject to peer review by two referees. Perspective essays are subject to peer review by one referee. Interviews and book or exhibition reviews are subject to review by the issue editor(s).

CONTACTS

Guest Editors

Please direct questions to the guest editors for the issue:
– Elvia Arroyo-Ramirez, University of California, Irvine: elvia.ar@uci.edu
– Jasmine Jones, University of California, Los Angeles: jjones@library.ucla.edu
– Shannon O’Neill, Barnard College: soneill@barnard.edu
– Holly Smith, Spelman College: hsmith12@spelman.edu

Journal Editors

Managing Editor: Andrew J Lau
Associate Editor: Emily Drabinski
Associate Editor: Rory Litwin

THE JOURNAL OF CRITICAL LIBRARY AND INFORMATION STUDIES

The mission of the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies is to serve as a peer-reviewed platform for critical discourse in and around library and information studies from across the disciplines. This includes but is not limited to research on the political economy of information, information institutions such as libraries, archives, and museums, reflections on professional contexts and practices, questioning current paradigms and academic trends, questioning the terms of information science, exploring methodological issues in the context of the field, and otherwise enriching and broadening the scope of library and information studies by applying diverse critical and trans-disciplinary perspectives. Recognizing library and information studies as a diverse, cross-disciplinary field reflective of the scholarly community’s diverse range of interests, theories, and methods, JCLIS aims to showcase innovative research that queries and critiques current paradigms in theory and practice through perspectives that originate from across the humanities and social sciences.

Each issue is themed around a particular topic or set of topics and features a guest editor (or guest editors) who will work with the managing editor to shape the issue’s theme and develop an associated call for papers. Issue editors will assist in the shepherding of manuscripts through the review and preparation processes, are encouraged to widely solicit potential contributions, and work with authors in scoping their respective works appropriately.

JCLIS is open access in publication, politics, and philosophy. In a world where paywalls are the norm for access to scholarly research, the Journal recognizes that removal of barriers to accessing information is key to the production and sharing of knowledge. Authors retain copyright of manuscripts published in JCLIS, generally with a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license. If an article is republished after initially publication in JCLIS, the republished article should indicate that it was first published by JCLIS.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS

The Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies welcomes submissions from senior and junior faculty, students, activists, and practitioners working in areas of research and practice at the intersection of critical theory and library and information studies.

Authors retain the copyright to material they publish in the JCLIS, but the Journal cannot re-publish material that has previously been published elsewhere. The journal also cannot accept manuscripts that have been simultaneously submitted to another outlet for possible publication.

CITATION STYLE

JCLIS uses the Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition as the official citation style for manuscripts published by the journal. All manuscripts should employ the Notes and Bibliography style (as footnotes with a bibliography), and should conform to the guidelines as described in the Manual.

SUBMISSION PROCESS

Authors interested in contributing to this special issue should submit manuscripts through JCLIS’ online submission system by January 30, 2019. This online submission process requires that manuscripts be submitted in separate stages in order to ensure the anonymity of the review process and to enable appropriate formatting.

Abstracts (500 words or less) should be submitted in plain text and should not include information identifying the author(s) or their institutional affiliations. With the exception of book reviews, an abstract must accompany all manuscript submissions before they are reviewed for publication.
The main text of the manuscript must be submitted as a stand-alone file (in Microsoft Word or RTF)) without a title page, abstract, page numbers, or other headers or footers. The title, abstract, and author information should be submitted through the submission platform.