Call for Papers – ‘Century of Broadcasting: Preservation and Renewal’ Conference

DEADLINE EXTENDED

Radio Survivor is pleased to share an announcement from the Radio Preservation Task Force (RPTF) of the Library of Congress about a call for papers for its forthcoming conference, “A Century of Broadcasting: Preservation and Renewal.” The event will be held October 22-24, 2020 at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. Presentation proposals are due by December 15, 2019. Read on for the full details from the RPTF:

A Century of Broadcasting: Preservation and Renewal

Conference Dates: Oct 22-24, 2020

Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

Proposal Deadline: Dec. 15, 2019

Call for Papers

The Radio Preservation Task Force (RPTF) of the Library of Congress invites applications for papers, panels, moderated discussions and workshops for a conference marking the centenary of broadcasting in the United States.

We seek presentations by archivists, radio and television historians, artists, information scientists, journalists, sound studies scholars, broadcasters and others highlighting how preservation can help us complicate and rethink our understandings of the history of mass media at community, local, national and international levels. We particularly welcome participants who put archival resources to work today to enrich radio, television, podcasting, music, literature, journalism, public history, installation art and other creative practices.

The conference will take place Oct. 22nd to 24th, 2020, at the Library of Congress on Capitol Hill, in Washington D.C. Registration is free for all presenters, moderators and respondents.

Celebrating One Hundred Years of Broadcasting

In the United States, the radio industry began primarily as a form of wireless telegraphy used for point-to-point communication. After World War I, government licensing began for stations that were changing the medium by airing point-to-mass broadcast transmissions of music and voice. From the celebrated Election Day broadcasts of Westinghouse station KDKA on November 2, 1920 to similar services offered by hundreds of other stations from coast to coast, the industry paradigm shifted. The broadcasting model endures to the present, characterizing media systems from large commercial networks to public broadcasting, satellite radio and online streaming services, and RSS-based podcasting.

This conference marks the centenary of that paradigm shift and investigates radio’s century of constant renewal and rebirth over the course of the intervening century, during which various radio and radio-like practices have been invented and reinvented, forgotten and remembered, in settings across the United States. We want to highlight a century dotted with “new” sound practices in this restless medium, from the first non-English programs to the first broadcasts aimed at communities of color, from the first international shortwave transmissions to the first true crime podcasts, the first educational shows to the first radio-based art. Our conference underscores the role of preservation in documenting (and even driving) the process of renewing radio from generation to generation and from community to community.

Renewing Radio Heritage

This meeting also takes place at a moment in which media history is itself changing, thanks to a renaissance in radio and television preservation, which has created an archive that is more diverse and richer than ever before, conveying a sharper sense of how broadcast media helped Americans articulate understanding of nation, region, class, gender, race, sexuality and ability. That is thanks in part to the work of the Radio Preservation Task Force, which for five years has been pursuing projects and partnerships to change the very archive itself in a way that necessitates fresh thinking about many firsts—and seconds, and thirds— in conventional national and international narratives of radio history.

Created in 2014 in fulfillment of a radio preservation mandate in the Library of Congress’s National Recording Preservation Plan, the RPTF is charged with fostering collaborations between researchers and archivists to facilitate work on radio preservation, developing an online inventory of extant collections, promoting preservation of endangered radio collections, encouraging use of radio and sound archives in educational settings, and cultivating academic study of archival radio materials. It currently boasts a network of hundreds of scholars and archivists who share materials, fundraising, and best practices. The RPTF has also constructed a national database aggregating information on over 2,500 radio collections from coast to coast, and has encouraged and overseen several special issues and anthologies on radio history and preservation. It is currently developing pedagogical guides for classroom use and resources to assist with preservation of endangered radio materials. To advance its goals, the RPTF partners with over 40 local, national, and international academic, archiving, and media organizations. A full list of partner institutions is available on our conference site.

Suggested Themes

This conference will focus on preservation’s historic and ongoing role in documenting and shaping new research from policy studies to sound studies, and new media practices from journalism to art. To that end, we seek panels, presentations and workshops whose ambit could include, but is not limited to:

  • Highlighting a specific archive based on historic recordings that challenge assumptions about mass media history, the invention or reinvention of formats, or show outreach to new audiences.
  • Offering best practices based on experience in preservation, from digitization and metadata to fair reuse, either on air or in arts settings.
  • Exploring techniques for researching, processing or reusing the changing radio archive, such as how to use specialized methods from machine learning to deep listening.
  • Examining communities whose stories have been lost but can now come to light as a result of the RPTF’s various initiatives and caucuses, especially communities of color, native communities, women’s radio history, LGBTQ histories, as well as among differently abled communities.
  • Examining how preservation can highlight radio’s historic and ongoing role in activism, especially at the regional, local and community level.
  • Looking at international histories of radio, and at preservation practices outside the United States, particularly in Latin America and Europe, from which U.S. archivists might learn.
  • Focusing on long-arc narratives of radio history—the history of crime reporting, for instance, or civil rights radio—that stretch across the entirety of the “broadcast century” and whose history isn’t limited to one “tier” of radio, but rather can be studied in contexts from large networks to local radio and podcasts, and everywhere in between.
  • Studying how preservation methods might be adapted for emerging forms of radio beyond traditional broadcasting platforms, particularly podcasting, as well as the study of broadcast platform elements themselves, from radio tower systems to RSS.
  • Focusing on preserving recordings from arts and freeform stations, as well as exploring how the materials that RPTF projects have uncovered can be reused in contemporary art, journalism and research in the new golden era of podcasting and sound art more broadly.
  • Providing practical advice for independent archivists, particularly when it comes to public history outreach, identifying possible funding and grant writing.

To Participate

Proposal options include papers, pre-constituted panels, moderated discussions, and workshops. To submit a proposal, email abstracts and other materials specified below in a single document to radiotaskforce@gmail.com by December 15, 2019. For questions, please contact neil.verma@northwestern.edu.

Papers. Individual archivists, scholars or artists are invited to submit an abstract for a paper of about 20 to 30 minutes in length on our conference themes. Successful applications will be organized into panels by the steering committee. Applications should include: A brief biography; contact information for the applicant including any institutional affiliation; a 400-word abstract with a title; and five keywords.

Pre-constituted Panels. Pre-constituted panels should have 3-4 participants, plus a moderator and/or respondent. These panels will be based on the presentation of papers, with each speaker given 20 to 30 minutes to speak. Applications should include: A brief biography for each applicant; contact information for each applicant including any institutional affiliations; a 400-word abstract with a title for each paper; five keywords for each paper; a 400-word abstract explaining the goal and ambit of the panel.

Moderated Discussions. These events will differ from pre-constituted panels in that they do not require formal prepared remarks and will instead focus on discussion and exchange. Groups of 4-6 participants may apply, with each participant expected to speak for 5-10 minutes about a current project, archival recording, or issue. Applications should include: A brief biography for each applicant; contact information for each applicant including any institutional affiliations; a 400-word abstract explaining the goal and ambit of the panel; five keywords for the panel as a whole.

Workshops. For workshops on specific issues (e.g., digitization, grant writing, analysis tools, recording workshops), a single presenter or team leads discussion and has an open forum to field questions. Applications should include: A brief biography for the workshop leader(s); contact information including any institutional affiliations; a 400-word abstract explaining the goal and ambit of the workshop including any technical equipment that would be needed.

The Library of Congress RPTF Conference Steering Committee

RPTF 2020 Conference Chair:

Neil Verma, Northwestern University

NRPB Chair:

Christopher Sterling, George Washington University

Library of Congress:

Steve Leggett (NRPB)

Cary O’Dell (NRPB)

RPTF Director:

Josh Shepperd, Catholic University and Penn State University

RPTF Assistant Director:

Shawn VanCour, University of California, Los Angeles

Conference Committee Members:

Matt Barton, Library of Congress

Claudia Calhoun, Fairfield University

Inés Casillas, University of California, Santa Barbara

Susan Douglas, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Christine Ehrick, University of Louisville

Anna Friz, University of California, Santa Cruz

Kathryn Fuller-Seeley, University of Texas, Austin

Michele Hilmes, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Bob Horton, Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Tom McEnaney, University of California, Berkeley

Julie-Beth Napolin, The New School

Stephanie Sapienza, University of Maryland

Jacob Smith, Northwestern University

Michael Socolow, University of Maine

Dave Walker, Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

CFP: Joint Meeting of The Society for History in the Federal Government and the Oral History in the MidAtlantic Region

Deadline Extended to November 29

“Stories from the Heart of Government: Politics and History”

The Society for History in the Federal Government (SHFG) will hold a joint annual meeting with  the Oral History in the MidAtlantic Region (OHMAR) on March 13-14, 2020, at the Robert C. Byrd Center for Congressional History and Education at Shepherdstown, WV. The 2020 Annual Meeting continues the Society’s 40th Anniversary commemoration.

Questions to consider include:

  • How do historians research and explore the stories of federal history and federal history offices?
  • What specific research challenges do we face in telling the stories of the federal government?
  • How can federal historians and practitioners who study federal history better promote and explain the importance of federal history to the general public?
  • How do federal historians use oral histories to capture and tell stories that supplement or contradict the official record?
  • How do federal history offices develop oral history collection policies to tell new and underrepresented stories in their agency’s histories?

The SHFG Annual Meeting is open to all scholars interested in federal history, including those working outside of the federal government and Washington, D.C. area. We encourage proposals from federal historians, graduate students, public historians, archivists from varied institutions, oral historians, digital archivists, and scholars from other disciplines. We also welcome panels composed of practitioners from a variety of backgrounds and experiences.

CFP: Special Library Association Contributed Papers

SLA Contributed Papers

The inspiration for a paper can come from almost anywhere. A hackfest. A Twitter chat. A conversation with a researcher or library user.

Each year, as many as 12 SLA members are invited to write and present papers at the SLA Annual Conference. The paper topics are chosen through a competitive selection process. Three or four of the papers are presented each day of the conference, thereby offering conference attendees multiple opportunities to hear directly from their peers about experiences they’ve had, research they’ve conducted, and best practices they’ve developed.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ACCEPTANCE
Paper topics should address library science, information management, or other issues related to customer service, technology, or administration in special libraries. Proposals will be judged on several criteria, including the applicability of the topic to SLA members, the clarity of scope, the potential for take-away ideas and concepts, and the quality of the writing.

Proposed papers must also meet these requirements:

  • At least one author is a member of SLA.
  • At least one author commits to presenting the paper at the annual conference.
  • The proposal is received by the deadline.
  • The paper has not been published in, or submitted to, any other publication or conference planning group.
  • The author (and any co-authors) must be willing to sign a copyright assignment form that will permit SLA to use the paper in various formats.

SUBMISSION PROCESS
Abstract submission: Paper authors must submit an abstract describing the topic of their paper. Abstracts should be 250-300 words in length, which is roughly one page in 12-point text. The abstract deadline for papers to be presented at the SLA 2020 Annual Conference is Friday, 13 December 2019. Send abstracts to Stuart Hales at SLA headquarters (shales@sla.org).
Paper selection: As many as 12 abstracts will be chosen for development into papers. All SLA members who submit abstracts will be notified of a decision no later than the end of January 2020.
Paper submission: Authors will submit their completed paper and copyright assignment form to Stuart Hales at SLA headquarters. The submission deadline is Friday, 8 May 2020.
Paper presentation: Authors will deliver a 15-minute presentation of their papers during a session at the SLA 2020 Annual Conference in Charlotte, N.C.

Authors whose proposals are selected for development into contributed papers should follow the guidelines below when writing their papers. Authors may also wish to view papers presented at previous SLA Annual Conferences to see how certain formatting challenges were addressed.

Specific questions should be referred to Stuart Hales at shales@sla.org.

STYLE
Length: Papers may be as long as necessary; however, paper presentations at the conference will be limited to 15 minutes.
Style: The Chicago Manual of Style (University of Chicago Press) should be consulted on all questions about editorial style. In particular, authors should review the chapter about using the author-date style for citations and reference lists, which explains the preferred approach to text and source citations.
Editing/Proofreading: Papers must be in final form when submitted; no editing will be permitted after papers are received. Authors are responsible for arranging for copy editing, proofreading and formatting.

TYPOGRAPHY
Papers should be set in Times New Roman type, as follows:
Title: The title of the paper should be centered at the top of the first page (no blank lines between margin and title) in bold 18-point Times New Roman, with the first letter of each significant word capitalized.
Byline: Authors’ names, titles, degrees, and affiliations should appear below the title of the paper in regular 14-point Times New Roman, centered, with the first letter of each significant word capitalized.
Headings: Chapter or major division headings should be in bold 16-point Times New Roman type, centered, with the first letter of each significant word capitalized. A-level subheadings should be in bold 14-point Times New Roman, centered, with all capital letters. B-level subheadings should be in bold 14-point Times New Roman, centered, with the first letter of each significant word capitalized. C-level subheadings should be in bold 12-point Times New Roman, flush with the left margin. The first letter of each significant word should be capitalized. D-level subheadings should be flush to the left margin in italic (not bold) 12-point Times New Roman, followed by a period. The subheading should in line with the first line of the paragraph. Only the first letter of each significant word should be capitalized.
Endnotes: The heading of the endnotes section should be titled “Endnotes” and set in bold 16-point Times New Roman type, centered.

FORMATTING
Pagination: Do not number the pages. In particular, do not use the “page break before” or “page break after” commands or the header or footer fields.
Margins: All four margins should be set to one inch.
Justification: Do not justify text. All text, except where specified otherwise (e.g., titles and bylines), should be flush left, ragged right.
Spacing: Single-space the text of your paper. Between paragraphs, include a single blank line. Use two blank lines between the end of a section and a following A-, B-, or C-level subheading; use one blank line between an A-, B-, or C-level subheading and the following text. Use only one space between sentences.
Indentation: Indent all paragraphs one-half inch (1.3 cm) using tabs, not spaces.
Authors: Each author’s name, title, degree, and affiliation should be centered below the title of the paper, with the first letter of each significant word capitalized. Insert two blank lines between the last line of the title and the first line of the lead author’s name. The author’s name and degree(s) should be on one line; the author’s title, employer and affiliation should appear below. Insert one blank line between the first author’s credentials and the second author’s name. Insert four blank lines between the last line of the last author’s name and the first line of text (or the first chapter heading).
Subheadings: Subheads should be no more than one-half line long. Do not number subheads.
Widows and Orphans: Try to avoid letting the last line of a paragraph fall by itself at the beginning of the following page (widow) or the first line of a paragraph fall by itself at the end of the preceding page (orphan). Hint: Use the settings in your word processing application to eliminate widows and orphans.
Hyphenation: Do not hyphenate words at the ends of lines. Hint:Use the settings in your word processing application to turn off automatic hyphenation.

GRAPHICS
Authors are encouraged to use charts, tables, maps, and other useful non-text elements to help amplify or clarify text in their papers. Number the illustrations, graphs, charts, and other graphics consecutively as Figure 1, Figure 2, and so on and refer to them as such in the text of the paper. If you create graphs or other illustrations in another application (such as PowerPoint), do not embed them as objects linked to the original file.
Note: If an image is under copyright, it is the author’s responsibility to obtain the proper permissions and provide proof of the permissions to SLA. Copyright and attribution information must be included in the captions for all images used by permission.

HYPERLINKS
Authors are encouraged to use hyperlinks/bookmarks for cross references within the paper or to related online information. Do not link to other documents that reside on your computer, since those documents will not be available to online readers.

CFP: “Evidence: The Use and Misuse of Data,” June 5, 2020, American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, PA

Inspired by its 2020 exhibition Dr. Franklin, Citizen Scientist, the American Philosophical Society Library & Museum is organizing a daylong symposium that explores the nature of evidence. The symposium reflects Benjamin Franklin’s many different uses of information and data throughout his life. His work with electricity relied on experimental data, while his work in oceanography relied on observed data as well as the incorporation of ideas borrowed from other observers. As a newspaper publisher and essayist, he produced and often reproduced news and other important information. Through his almanacs, he shared a wide range of knowledge with the public. Later in life, his service on a French commission investigating mesmerism deployed the scientific method to test the reliability of evidence itself. Given Franklin’s myriad uses of and approaches to evidence, the APS Library & Museum invites innovative proposals from scholars who wish to explore the past, present, and future use of evidence and data.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • The various ways evidence has been interpreted differently over time and the ways it has been applied and misapplied to shape policy and decisions;
  • The past, present, and future methods used to collect evidence and present findings, and the opportunities and potential problems associated with such methods;
  • The presence and misuse of bad data, erroneous evidence, and misinformation, and the ways such material have affected the production of knowledge and threaten it today;
  • The role of bias during data collection and its interpretation by scholars;
  • The opportunities and perils presented when evidence produces unexpected results.

Applicants should submit a title and a 250-word proposal along with a C.V. by December 13, 2019 via Interfolio: https://apply.interfolio.com/69616.

The symposium will be held on June 4-5, 2020 in Philadelphia. Decisions will be announced in February 2020. All presenters will receive travel subsidies and hotel accommodations. Accepted papers will be due a month before the conference and pre-circulated to registered attendees. Papers should be no longer than 15 double-spaced pages. Presenters may also have the opportunity to publish revised papers in the APS’s Proceedings, one of the longest running scholarly journals in America.

For more information, visit https://www.amphilsoc.org/, or contact Adrianna Link, Head of Scholarly Programs, at alink@amphilsoc.org.

CfP: Third Workshop on Scientific Archives / European XFEL, Hamburg, DE / 30 June-1 July 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS:

Proposals are now being accepted for the Third Workshop on Scientific Archives, which will take place at European XFEL (https://www.xfel.eu/index_eng.html), near Hamburg, Germany on 30 June and 1 July 2020.

Proposed topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Collaborating with scientists to capture contemporary scientific material
  • Using scientific archives for outreach and education
  • Using and re-using archival resources in current science
  • Enabling access to scientific records
  • Describing technical and scientific archives
  • Managing and archiving research data
  • Exploring the role of archives and records in open science
  • Capturing diversity in institutional archives
  • Scientific archives in a “post-truth” world
  • Diversity and inclusion in STEM // Diversity and inclusion in archives

Papers are to be 20 minutes. Please submit a 400-word abstract using the following form by Friday 31 January 2020http://tiny.cc/e888cz

More information can be found at: https://www.embl.de/aboutus/archive/working-with-scientific-archives/workshop/

Organized by the Committee on the Archives of Science and Technology (https://www.ica.org/en/committees) of the International Council on Archives, Section on University and Research Institution Archives (https://www.ica.org/en/suv)

Call for Proposals: Digital Initiatives Symposium 2020

The Digital Initiatives Symposium at the University of San Diego is accepting proposals for its full day conference on Tuesday, April 28, 2020. We welcome proposals from a wide variety of organizations, including colleges and universities of all sizes, community colleges, public libraries, special libraries, museums, and other cultural memory institutions.

Proposals should fall into one of two formats:

  • Concurrent sessions: 45 minutes (please allow 10-15 minutes for Q&A); 1-2 speakers.

  • Lightning talks: 10 minutes; limited to one speaker

This year, we are especially interested in proposals from international applicants and/or proposals with international perspectives. We will be welcoming keynote speakers Reggie Raju (University of Cape Town, South Africa) and Arianna Becerril-Garcia (Redalyc).

Other relevant topics include:

  • social justice and open access

  • the future of open access

  • Plan S
  • data management and sharing; open data

  • Linked data

  • open educational resources

  • curation of digital collections

  • digital initiatives in instruction and undergraduate research

  • roles for deans and directors in digital and institutional repository initiatives

  • roles for disciplinary faculty in digital and institutional repository initiatives

  • diverse repository platforms and functions

  • digital humanities

  • copyright, licensing, and privacy issues

  • collaboration: interdisciplinary initiatives and collaboration within and between campuses

  • scholarly communication

  • technical applications related to platforms or tools

  • web archiving

  • web annotation

Submit your proposal at digital.sandiego.edu/symposium (Click on “Submit Proposal” on the left sidebar.) Please note:

  • In the interest of providing a rich, face-to-face experience for attendees, virtual / remote presentations and lightning talks will not be accepted.

  • All submissions will be evaluated based on the relevance of the topic and potential to advance thinking about digital initiatives, institutional repositories, and scholarly communication. Acceptance is competitive.

  • Registration fees will be waived for accepted presenters.

Proposal deadline: Friday, Nov. 22, 2019

CFP: 2020 Supporting Undergraduate Research Conference

Call for Proposals

The Supporting Undergraduate Research Conference planning team invites faculty, students, librarians, instructional technologists, and others interested in supporting student research to submit a session proposal for the conference.

Potential themes include:

  • Improving student research practices
  • Strategies for making research more prominent in the curriculum
  • Research support needs specific to sophomores and juniors
  • Outreach to and/or working with students from underrepresented groups
  • Data intensive research projects
  • Reproducible research across the curriculum
  • Working with primary sources
  • Designing and supporting digital scholarship projects in courses
  • Collaboration on campus and beyond
  • Engagement with the broader scholarly community

We welcome proposals that engage with these themes or other aspects of collaborative undergraduate research support, and are particularly eager to see proposals from teams that include students, faculty, and staff.

Submit session proposals by November 4, 2019.