Call for Submissions: Sustainability in Libraries

This call does not specifically mention archives, but directly relates to initiatives that archivists are engaged in.

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Sustainability in Libraries, edited by Rebekkah Smith Aldrich, Monika Antonelli, Adrian Ho, and René Tanner will be published by ALA Editions. The book will offer insights into the important developments on how librarians provide leadership and how libraries serve as models for sustainable practices. The editors are seeking articles from a variety of perspectives on topics related to sustainability-including crisis preparation, response, and recovery-within the library profession.

Objective of the Book:

In 2019, the American Library Association adopted Sustainability as a new core value. This book will provide direction to library personnel and libraries as institutions to position themselves as connectors, conveners, and catalysts for the changes needed. “Sustainability” is not an end point but a mindset, a lens through which operational and outreach decisions can be made. With the climate crisis upon us and its devastating impact on wildlife, oceans, air quality, soil, and the very fabric of life on Earth, we are compelled to find answers and provide direction for our library communities whether they be rural, suburban, metropolitan, schools, or institutions of higher learning. The examples and ideas shared in this edited volume will have far reaching potential and bolster the United Nations’ work on the Sustainable Development Goals, which seek to create a more sustainable future for all.

Suggested Topics:

The book chapters will be divided into three main themes for sustainable action.

Theme #1: Libraries as Inspiration & Catalysts – Content that would fall under this theme include topics and examples related to how libraries may provide leadership and serve as a model for sustainable practices through facility stewardship, innovative service design, and outreach and partnership practices.

Theme #2: Libraries as Conveners & Connectors – Content that would fall under this theme include topics and examples related to how libraries work collaboratively through visionary partnerships to facilitate collective impact work to address existing challenges and opportunities with a focus on community well-being and self-reliance.

Theme #3: Libraries as Contributors to Community Resilience – Content that would fall under this theme includes topics and examples of how libraries contribute to future community resilience. For example, active participation in library-centric or community-based resilience/disaster preparedness, response, and recovery efforts and work that contributes to creating a culture of respect, understanding, and empathy in the library’s service area.

Target Audience:

The intended audience for this book is people working in public, school, academic, special, rural, and urban libraries. In addition, this book will include instructional materials to be used in Library and Information Science programs to educate future library practitioners about Sustainability, the newest Core Value of Librarianship.

Special Considerations:

High quality, large file, professional, black and white images are encouraged to enhance the text. Unless they are public domain or openly licensed for commercial use, a permission release will be required for each image submitted. A model release form will be necessary for any images with recognizable people in them. The person must be a legal adult or have a parent’s permission to use the image.

Submission Guidelines:

The editors welcome submissions from authors who are interested or have experience creating sustainable libraries or working on topics of sustainability in connection with libraries. The editors are open to a variety of submissions including research articles, how-to articles, essays, and interviews. Manuscript submissions should comply with APA Style.

The editors are looking for submissions about sustainability in libraries that emphasize scalable approaches that can be applied to a variety of libraries at different levels. Brief proposals about programs and partnerships that provide inspiration and actionable takeaways are encouraged. Submit a summary of your proposed article (300 words or less) to Sustainability in Libraries.

The development of manuscripts will be done in phases. After comments are returned to authors regarding accepted chapter summary proposals, a chapter outline (500 words or less) will be requested.

Once authors receive acceptance for their chapters they will submit their final manuscripts in .doc or .docx format.  Suggested length is 2,000 to 3,500 words.  Manuscripts should comply with APA style guidelines.

Timeline:

  • Chapter Summary Proposal deadline:  June 15, 2020
  • Notification by editors of proposal acceptance: July 15, 2020
  • Chapter Outlines deadline:  August 17, 2020
  • First Manuscript Drafts deadline: October 1, 2020
  • Additional key dates will be sent to successful proposal writers.

Submit chapter summary proposals to: forms.gle/axqBoa1c9LAa6GQF6

For additional information, please contact:

Adrian Ho, Director of Digital Scholarship, University of Kentucky, hoadriank[at]gmail[dot]com, or

Rene Tanner, Liaison Librarian, Humanities Division, Arizona State University, rene.tanner[at]asu[dot]edu.

ACRL’s Publications in Librarianship Monograph Series Announces First Open Peer Review

This has nothing to do with archives, but I find this a very interesting project – to have an open peer-review. Anyone can participate as long as they agree to the terms.


ACRL’s Publications in Librarianship (PIL) series—a peer-reviewed collection of books that examine emerging theories and research—is launching its first open peer review, for Stories of Open: Opening Peer Review through Narrative Inquiry by Emily Ford.

“Open access, open data, open science, and other ‘open’ initiatives bring democratization and transparency to scholarly publishing and access to information,” said PIL Editor Daniel C. Mack. “Rather than limiting the assessment and evaluation of research to a single editor or editorial board, open peer review empowers the entire community of scholars to participate in the review process. Stories of Open presents readers with a thought-provoking introduction to open peer review; we couldn’t imagine a better manuscript for our pilot open review.”

The manuscript is open for comment through Monday, March 23, 2020. It is available for review in two places, and we welcome and encourage your participation: First, via Google documents here, where participants will need to use their Google account and request access at the top left before commenting. Doing so means agreeing to the reviewer’s code of conduct. A PDF version of the manuscript is available for review on the ACRL site. Comments should be sent to Daniel C. Mack at dmack@umd.edu.

Stories of Open is expected to publish in early 2021. Previous PIL books can be found in the ALA Store; information on publishing in the series is here. Questions on the review, process, or publishing with ACRL can be sent to ACRL Content Strategist Erin Nevius at enevius@ala.org.

New Journal: Unbound: A Journal of Digital Scholarship

from the Digital Humanities Discussion Group (ALA):

Hello, Everyone:

I’m excited this morning to announce the launch of Unbound: A Journal of Digital ScholarshipUnbound publishes work that explores the interstices of digital scholarship, broadly conceived, with an emphasis on digital cultural studies; critical digital humanities; galleries, libraries, archives, and museums; the interpretive social sciences; and socially engaged computational or quantitative methods. This open access journal publishes editorials, essays, reviews, pedagogy and praxis notes (short form works on research in progress, single-institution case studies, and pedagogy), and new media art, music, and performance portfolios. We welcome submissions from scholars and professionals at all stages of professional development in all fields.

In addition to publishing original scholarship, Unbound is the venue for the proceedings of the Digital Frontiers conference, and related satellite events. The first issue features essays and abstracts from Realizing Resistance: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Star Wars, Episodes VII, VIII & IX, which took place May 2-4, 2019 at the University of North Texas.

I am joined on the Editorial Board by John Edward Martin (UNT), Leigh Bonds (Ohio State), Jenn Stayton (UNT), Kevin Jenkins (Penn State), Adetty Pérez de Miles (Texas State), Joshua Jackson (North Carolina State), and Brea Henson (UNT). The journal is published by Digital Frontiers and hosted by the University of North Texas Libraries.
The Call for Contributions is now open, and guidelines are also available for proposing special issues.

Please join me in celebrating this event, and please share the Call for Contributions generously.

With Warm Regards,
Spencer D. C. Keralis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Digital Humanities Librarian
Liaison: Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities
University of Illinois Urbana Champaign
spencerk@illinois.edu
Pronouns: he/they
ORCID: 0000-0003-0903-5587

Call for Submissions: 2020 Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards

The ALA/ACRL/RBMS Exhibition Awards Committee is pleased to announce that submissions for the 2020 Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards are being accepted until Tuesday, October 15, 2019. The awards are given annually in recognition of excellence in the publication of catalogs and brochures that accompany exhibitions of library and archival materials, as well as for digital exhibitions of such materials. The prizes are administered and awarded by the  Exhibition Awards Committee. For more information, and a list of previous winners, please see http://www.ala.org/acrl/awards/publicationawards/leabawards.

Submissions of printed materials (4 copies of each catalog or brochure) must be postmarked by October 15. For digital exhibitions, only an entry form is required. The form should be submitted online by October 15.

After judging is completed and the awards announced, the printed materials are sent to The Bancroft Library at UC Berkeley and the Grolier Club in New York City. This constitutes a duplicate archive of the self-selected best work in the field.

We welcome any questions potential submitters may have, and look forward to your entries!

Anna Chen
Chair, Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards Committee
Rare Books & Manuscripts Section, ACRL, ALA

Call for Submissions: 2019 Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards

The ALA/ACRL/RBMS Exhibition Awards Committee is pleased to announce that submissions for the 2019 Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards are being accepted until Monday, October 15, 2018. The awards are given annually in recognition of excellence in the publication of catalogs and brochures that accompany exhibitions of library and archival materials, as well as for digital exhibitions of such materials. The prizes are administered and awarded by the  Exhibition Awards Committee. For more information, and a list of previous winners, please see http://www.ala.org/acrl/awards/publicationawards/leabawards.

Submissions of printed materials (4 copies of each catalog or brochure) must be postmarked by October 15. For digital exhibitions, only an entry form is required. The form should be submitted online by October 15.

After judging is completed and the awards announced, the printed materials are sent to The Bancroft Library at UC Berkeley and the Grolier Club in New York City. This constitutes a duplicate archive of the self-selected best work in the field.

We welcome any questions potential submitters may have, and look forward to your entries!

Anna Chen
Chair, Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards Committee
Rare Books & Manuscripts Section, ACRL, ALA

Anna Chen
Head Librarian
William Andrews Clark Memorial Library
UCLA

CFP: The Ideabook of Positive Change in the Library Workplace

This does not specifically mention archives, but the issues are pertinent and applicable.

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Call for papers and essays

http://bit.ly/2NZ7NMQ

Working Title: The Ideabook of Positive Change in the Library Workplace
Editors: Heather Seibert, Amanda Vinogradov, Amanda H. McLellan – East Carolina University, Joyner Library.
Deadline for drafts: September 5, 2018
Publisher: American Library Association Press (ALA Press)
Submission Form: https://goo.gl/forms/wny3vqnKvRRsLVxz1

We are soliciting a diverse range of essays and narratives from practicing U.S. academic, public and special libraries staff, for inclusion in a curated anthology that empowers library employees to change real-world issues pertaining to library staff. Submissions may include any phase of project development, but we are especially seeking: perspectives and advice on how to make and implement change, how to talk to administration about needs, the specific steps taken in the process, solutions to roadblocks and recognition of the future needs of staff. We also seek narratives, steps and ideas from administrators on how to implement and create a positive work environment and the challenges faced in this process.  Paraprofessional staff and first-time authors are encouraged to apply.

Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Lactation accommodation
  • Flexible scheduling
  • Development of policies and procedures allowing remote work (i.e. weather related absences for employees with leave time deficits)
  • Childcare accommodations
  • Changing tables in restrooms
  • Parental leave policies
  • Space and time for dialysis or other medical needs
  • Standing desks
  • Promotion of exercise at work
  • Inclusive ideas for work outings, gatherings or meetings
  • Veterans on active duty or return from duty
  • Race and ethnicity inclusion and sensitivity
  • Gender neutral bathrooms
  • Dealing with bias
  • Providing space for prayer and/or meditation
  • Inclusive recruitment practices
  • Updating policies to be more inclusive
  • Development of policies and space for employees with varying sensory needs (Autism spectrum, PTSD, etc)
  • Case studies of libraries that have successfully handled difficult situations regarding discrimination or harassment.
  • Employees returning to school for further education

Timeline

Deadline for Draft Submission: September 5, 2018
Notification/Feedback regarding submission: October 10, 2018
Final submission for accepted drafts: Jan. 12, 2019

Submissions:

*This anthology will contain commentary, narratives and experiences.  Drafts accepted must be between four to six pages double spaced (about 350 words per page).  A suggested template will be provided for all accepted submissions to the anthology.

*Materials cannot be previously published or simultaneously submitted.

*All photos, illustrations, graphs etc. must have a Creative Commons License or be in the public domain. The submission’s author is responsible for verifying that these materials fall under the respected licenses. Each will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis and will be at the discretion of the editors for inclusion.

*If your submission is tentatively accepted, we may request modifications.

*Accepted contributors should expect to sign a release form in order to be published, and will agree to follow submission guidelines.

We STRONGLY encourage submission from all regardless of classification of positions within academic and public libraries. We are seeking input from administrators, faculty, as well as staff employees.

Submission Formhttps://goo.gl/forms/wny3vqnKvRRsLVxz1

Thank you

Heather Seibert, Amanda Vinogradov & Amanda H. McLellan

CFP: Censorship Stories from the Frontline (ALA Publication)

This call doesn’t specifically mention archives, but there’s definite potential.

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You are invited to participate in a new book that will be published by the American Library Association.  The book is a collection of stories from and about librarians who have experienced challenges to library material and/or challenges to intellectual freedom.  The book has the current working title:  Censorship Stories from the Frontline.

The book is an anthology of stories from all library types.  Stories will address examples of censorship challenges related to (but not limited to): religious intolerance, prisoner rights,  Black Lives Matter, anti-immigrant sentiment, international challenges, politics, working with culturally sensitive material, weeding as a form of censorship, self-censorship, displays, intellectual freedom, disinvited speakers, trigger warnings, Me Too, meeting room uses, or any other censorship topic you have experienced in a library or related to library material and/or programming.

The deadline for submissions is September 30, 2018

For more information about this project, to join the mailing list, and to follow the book’s progress visit: www.intellectualfreedombook.com

Essay Guidelines

Essays should be no more than 2500 words in length, and should provide details of a full experience, from initial contact through ultimate resolution. Essays can be a first person narrative or a case study description. I am also seeking descriptions of interactions that may not have ended in a formal challenge or request for reconsideration. These anecdotes should reflect the concerns of either the patron or the librarian or both.

Tips on writing: Explain the situation and how you were involved.  What were some of the most interesting and/or difficult parts of the situation?  How was the issue resolved?   What resources did you draw upon (don’t list resources; tell us about the resources and why they were helpful)? Had you received any training on handling challenges prior to the situation you describe? Have you received any since? Did your library have a procedure in place? If not, does it have one now? What did you learn from the experience?  What advice would you give to someone in a similar situation?

Writers should include the facts of the challenge.  If this is information is based on a personal experience, please share your thoughts and feelings about the confrontation, dealing with administrators, and dealing with the public.

Email submissions to:  intellectualfreedombook@gmail.com

Your submissions should be submitted with the following information:

  1. Title your essay.
  2. Include a 100 word biographical statement.

Your submissions should follow these formatting rules:

  1. Text should be attached as a .doc
  2.  Your Name should be the document label (example JaneSmith.doc)
  3. If you have questions about style, please consult The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, as your general guide to punctuation, capitalization, quotation, abbreviation, source citation, use of italic, etc.

Submitting an essay does not guarantee publication.  If you have questions about your essay and/or topic, please contact me at:  intellectualfreedombook@gmail.com

Contributors will be asked to sign a writer agreement before publication.

Deadline for submissions: September 30, 2018

Interviews

If you would prefer to be interviewed about your experience, send me an email with a description of the experience.  Please provide links and/or attachments to any material that will provide additional background on the situation.

Please distribute this announcement widely and forward it to librarians you believe might have a story to tell.

I look forward to hearing from you!

Val Nye

intellectualfreedombook@gmail.com

New/Recent Books

Information Systems: Process and Practice
Edited by Christine Urquhart, Faten Hamad, Dina Tbaishat, and Alison Yeoman

The Stuff of Bits: An Essay on the Materialities of Information 
by Paul Douris

Capturing Our Stories: An Oral History of Librarianship in Transition
A. Arro Smith

The Silence of the Archive
David Thomas, Simon Fowler, and Valerie Johnson

Creating Exhibits That Engage: A Manual for Museums and Historical Organizations
John Summers

Cultural Heritage Care and Management: Theory and Practice
edited by Cecilia Lizama Salvatore

Things Great and Small: Collections Management Policies, Second Edition
John E. Simmons

Commemoration: The American Association for State and Local History Guide
edited by Seth C. Bruggeman

An American Association for State and Local History Guide to Making Public History
edited by Bob Beatty

Fostering Empathy Through Museums
edited by Elif M. Gokcigdem

Practical Preservation and Conservation Strategies for Libraries
Brian J. Baird, illustrated by Jody Brown

Directory of Rare Book and Special Collections in the UK and Republic of Ireland, 3rd edition
edited by Karen Attar

Linked Data for Cultural Heritage
edited by Ed Jones and Michele Seikel

Open Licensing for Cultural Heritage
Gill Hamilton and Fred Saunderson

Valuing Your Collection: A practical guide for museums, libraries and archives
Freda Matassa

SAA Preservation Publication Award

from the SAA website:

Preserving Our Heritage: Perspectives from Antiquity to the Digital Age by Michele V. Cloonan (ALA Neal-Schuman/Facet) is the recipient of the Society of American Archivists’ Preservation Publication Award. Established in 1993, the award recognizes and acknowledges the author or editor of an outstanding published work related to archives preservation and, through this acknowledgment, encourages outstanding achievement by others.

Read the full announcement.

Also, ALA is offering $10 off if you use the code PHPA16 (limited time only).