Update, plus Archivaria and The Public Historian are open access

Greetings to all-

As I’m sure it has been for many of you, the past couple of weeks have consisted of planning work-from-home projects. I hope to get back to regular posts soon.

In the meantime, Archivaria and The Public Historian have temporarily opened all their content for free access. If you hear of more, send me a message and I’ll share!

Thanks,
Cheryl

Archivaria

Temporary removal of embargo

In response to the public health crisis of COVID-19, we’re pleased to announce that we’ll be making the eight most recent issues of Archivaria freely available to all through this site and on Project Muse. Content from the last four years will now be available free for all until June 30th 2020. As always, all other previous issues are available in the Back Issues section of this site for your reading pleasure during these challenging times!

Posted: 2020-03-23

The Public Historian

Looking for free, unlocked access to The Public Historian
(University of California Press) at this time? As part of the Press’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Press has made arrangements for all of its journal content (including that of The Public Historian) to be made freely available through the end of June. This is to assist the community of libraries, faculty, students, and scholars with access during a time when their usual access is likely disrupted or challenged due to library closures, remote working arrangements, etc. Let us know how this access changes the way you use The Public Historian during this time! https://tph.ucpress.edu

 

New Issue: Archival Science

Volume 20, Issue 1, March 2020

Original Paper
“Problems with records and recordkeeping practices are not confined to the past”: a challenge from the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse
Frank Golding

Original Paper
Decolonizing recordkeeping and archival praxis in childhood out-of-home Care and indigenous archival collections
Sue McKemmish, Jane Bone, Joanne Evans, Frank Golding, Antonina Lewis

Original Paper
The flexibility of the records continuum model: a response to Michael Karabinos’ “in the shadow of the continuum”
Viviane Frings-Hessami

Original Paper
Epistemologies of the archive: toward a critique of archival reason
Jason Lustig

Original Paper
The implications of digital collection takedown requests on archival appraisal
Shelly Black

Correction
Correction to: “To go beyond”: towards a decolonial archival praxis
J. J. Ghaddar, Michelle Caswell

New Journal: Reviews in Digital Humanities

Welcome to Reviews in Digital Humanities

Reviews in Digital Humanities, edited by Dr. Jennifer Guiliano and Dr. Roopika Risam, is the pilot of a peer-reviewed journal and project registry that facilitates scholarly evaluation and dissemination of digital humanities work and its outputs. We accept submissions of projects that blend humanistic and technical inquiry in a broad range of methods, disciplines, scopes, and scales. These include but are not limited to: digital archives, multimedia or multimodal scholarship, digital exhibits, visualizations, digital games, and digital tools. We particularly encourage submission of digital scholarship in critical ethnic, African diaspora, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian American, and postcolonial studies. Submit your work or contact the editors at reviewsindigitalhumanities@gmail.com.

Call for Proposals: A special issue of Across the Disciplines, Spring 2021 Unsettling Archival Research Across the Disciplines: Engaging Critical, Communal, and Digital Archives

This CFP was sent to me via the Suggest a Topic form I have. I always welcome notices of calls or other publication news!

Call for Proposals: A special issue of Across the Disciplines, Spring 2021 Unsettling Archival Research Across the Disciplines: Engaging Critical, Communal, and Digital Archives

Guest editors: Gesa Kirsch, Caitlin Burns, and Dakoda P. Smith, University of Louisville

This special issue of Across the Disciplines invites scholars to explore what it means to unsettle archival research across the disciplines. Efforts have long been underway to decolonize archival work and archival holdings, to repatriate artifacts, to change derogatory terms in finding aids, to consult with community members about appropriate protection of sacred artifacts, and to heal and reconcile in the wake of wounded/wounding histories (Till; Brasher et al.). Much work has attended to unsettling and wrestling with archives. From one perspective, settler archives are a storehouse for the West’s fictions and myths and a premier site of production for colonial difference, demanding a recovery of absences and silences (García). Yet, despite these important interventions, institutional archives with colonial roots continue to grow, collecting artifacts outside of the communities to which they belong; university archives continue to occupy Native American lands; and governments and corporations surveil our behavior and organize our personal data into digital archives, often with harmful consequences. Such institutions often remain wound(ed/ing) spaces and places.

This special issue of ATD welcomes both critiques of archiving as a set of institutional practices, ideologies, and conventions, and new tactics of critical, communal, and digital archiving within and against those systems of power. We invite scholars to highlight critical, communal, and digital approaches to archival work, to consider how radical political approaches might support them, to reflect on how to counteract and resist racist, colonial histories, and to explore alternatives, perhaps through decolonial, engaged, reciprocal, or collaborative archival practices. We encourage scholars to consider multimodal and digital technologies (Enoch & Bessette), Indigenous methodologies (Cushman, Powell, Tuhiwai Smith, Wilson), decolonial theories (García & Baca; Ruiz & Sánchez), feminist approaches (Enoch, Gaillet, Ramírez, Royster and Kirsch), antiracist efforts (Archives for Black Lives in Philadelphia), queer and trans practices (Bessette, Rawson), disability studies (Brilmyer, Dolmage, McRuer, White), and other perspectives for reconsidering archival research.

Critical, communal, and digital archives often respond to a political moment, to social and cultural conditions, and to the needs of a community by reclaiming and/or retooling certain archival practices, sometimes rewriting archival conventions altogether. For example, marginalized communities and groups do not collect for the sake of collection. They often collect with the survival of their future generations in mind and to pass down their histories. This special issue invites contributions that shed light on how tactical archival practices can decenter, reshape, unsettle and rewrite traditional archival methodologies.

We invite scholars from across the disciplines, including the arts, humanities and social sciences, to submit a contribution in any of the following formats:

1. full-length essays (6,000 – 8,000 words) that unsettle archival research across the disciplines, including methodological interventions, theoretical approaches, praxis in critical, communal, and digital archival building, ethical explorations, community-engaged projects, critical reflections on affect and the consequences of archival research, and more.

2. multimodal projects that explore the affordances of a variety of digital media platforms for the purpose of critical, communal, and digital archiving, as well as projects that attend to the importance of materiality, ephemera, and the artifactual (Pahl & Rowsell; Wysocki & Sheridan).

3. shorter essays (2,500-3,000 words) that might interrogate a key term, offer a critical case study, examine a communal collection, recover a neglected site, repurpose a digital archive, or share a pedagogical application. We have designed the shorter essays to make it possible for graduate students, adjunct faculty, activists, emerging, contingent, underrepresented scholars, and other rebel voices to contribute to this special issue.

Contributors to this special issue may wish to consider the following questions:

  • How might we unsettle institutional archives, given that place-based archives are often housed in institutions such as university and community libraries, historical societies, museums, medical schools, national monuments, national archives and special collections, and research centers? How might we re-envision common features such as curated materials, organized collections, finding aids, and procedures for handling materials to avoid re-inscribing colonial, racist, and sexist perspectives (Archivists Against History Repeating Itself)?
  • How might we create, curate, and work with ephemeral archives, counter-archives, community-engaged and community-generated archives, archives-in-the-making, virtual or digital archives, rebel archives, impromptu archives? What are their affordances and limitations?
  • What does it mean to collect and curate artifacts? Who decides what’s worth collecting, and who is left out of the conversation? Is it possible to both collect and contextualize? How might we write histories of gaps, absences, and missing voices?
  • What new tactics emerge in critical, communal, and digital archiving within and against systems of power? How do we reassess our digital archival practices, in particular, in light of recent concerns about access, digital privacy, surveillance, and data collection (Beck)?
  • How can archives assist in delinking (García & Baca) and decolonial praxis projects (García)? Can archives undermine the logic of the colonial imaginary by helping us get to the locally situated practices that decoloniality calls for?
  • How do archival professionals engage with troubling, haunting, and problematic collections? What are best practices and challenges today for unsettling archival research? How do archives and archivists approach issues of coloniality?
  • How might we address the affective dimensions and emotional labor of archival research (Powell)? How might we honor “reciprocity, respect, and relational accountability” (Wilson), collaborate with the non-living, engage with the past, present, and future?
  • How do we address questions of labor—the time, resources, space, and travel often required to engage in archival research? What are the consequences of such constraints for graduate students, adjunct faculty, activists, emerging, contingent, underrepresented scholars who may be particularly vulnerable and underfunded?

All references in this CFP are available upon request.

Proposals due: April 15, 2020
Notification of Acceptance: May 15, 2020
Manuscripts Due: August 1, 2020
Editorial Feedback: October 1, 2020
Final Manuscripts Due: January 1, 2021
Publication: Spring 2021

Proposal Format: Please submit a 500-word proposal explaining your topic, the research and theoretical base on which you will draw, and your plans for the structure of your article, following the general guidelines for ATD at http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/submissions. Send your proposal electronically (in MS Word format) to Gesa Kirsch at gesa.kirsch@gmail.com and also to ATD editor Michael Cripps at mcripps@une.edu. Please provide full contact information with your submission.

New Journal: Journal of Library Outreach and Engagement

The inaugural call for papers is not yet out, but there is an announcement about a new open access journal and archives is included in the type of content.

Journal of Library Outreach and Engagement

Focus and Scope

The mission of the Journal of Library Outreach & Engagement (JLOE) is to serve as the premier peer-reviewed, open access interdisciplinary journal to advance library outreach and engagement. JLOE provides a platform to disseminate original research that examines public and community engagement initiatives and stimulates a forum to discuss the methodological and epistemological issues that inform, or emerge from, such projects and programs.

Frequency and Schedule of Publication

We will publish two issues per year, one fall and one spring issue. Each issue will contain a letter from the editor(s), a minimum of four scholarly articles, and optionally a handful of “Idea Lab” and “Notes from the Field” columns, and/or book reviews.

Types of Content Included

We welcome articles or editorials that present original research, case studies, or comparable material that advance library outreach and engagement discussions. Authors and their submissions represent libraries of all types, including academic, public, school, and special libraries and archives.

Scholarly Review

Scholarly submissions will undergo a double-blind peer review process.

Open Access and Copyright Policies

The Editors and Editorial Board of JLOE strongly encourages authors to publish the Work under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license (CC BY 4.0) that allows others to distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon the Work, even commercially, as long as they credit the Author for the original creation. The Author may however choose to have the Work distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license (CC BY-NC 4.0).

Target Audience

Library workers at all administrative levels from all types of libraries who have an interest in outreach and engagement, and researchers from the field of library and information science.

New Articles: International Journal of Digital Curation

IJDC is published on a rolling basis. Further papers will be added in due course.

Vol 14 No 1 (2019)

Papers (peer-reviewed)

Digital Curation Education at the Universities of Ibadan and Liverpool
Abiola Abioye, James Lowry, Rosemary Lynch

Progress in Research Data Services
Andrew M Cox, Dr, Mary Anne Kennan, Dr, Elizabeth Josephine Lyon, Dr, Stephen Pinfield, Dr, Laura Sbaffi, Dr

Making Meaning of Historical Papua New Guinea Recordings
Amanda Harris, Steven Gagau, Jodie Kell, Nick Thieberger, Nick Ward

Putting the Trust into Trusted Data Repositories: A Federated Solution for the Australian National Imaging Facility
Andrew James Mehnert, Andrew Janke, Marco Gruwel, Wojtek James Goscinski, Thomas Close, Dean Taylor, Aswin Narayanan, George Vidalis, Graham Galloway, Andrew Treloar

Updating the Data Curation Continuum
Andrew Treloar, Jens Klump

Identifying Topical Coverages of Curricula using Topic Modeling and Visualization Techniques: A Case of Digital and Data Curation
Seungwon Yang, Boryung Ju, Haeyong Chung

Challenges and Directions in 3D and VR Data Curation
Nathan Frank Hall, Juliet Hardesty, Zack Lischer-Katz, Jennifer Johnson, Matt Cook, Julie Griffin, Andrea Ogier, Tara Carlisle, Zhiwu Xie, Robert McDonald, Jamie Wittenberg

Articles
Practices, Challenges, and Prospects of Big Data Curation: a Case Study in Geoscience
Suzhen Chen, Bin Chen, Dr.

Developing a Data Management Consultation Service for Faculty Researchers: a Case Study from a Large Midwestern Public University
Virginia A Dressler, Kristin Yeager, Elizabeth Richardson

Research Data Management in a Cultural Heritage Organisation
Tom Drysdale

Assessing Metadata and Curation Quality
Rebecca Grant, Graham Smith, Iain Hrynaszkiewicz

Human Security Informatics, Global Grand Challenges and Digital Curation
Anne J. Gilliland, James Lowry

Improving the Reproducibility of LaTeX Documents by Enriching Figures with Embedded Scripts and Data
Christian Thomas Jacobs

A Class Focused Approach to Research Outputs and Policy Literature Metadata
Les Kneebone

Building an Aotearoa New Zealand-wide Digital Curation Community of Practice
Jessica Moran, Floran Feltham, Valerie Love

Experimental Data Curation at Large Instrument Facilities with Open Source Software
Line Pouchard, Kerstin Kleese van Dam, Stuart I Campbell

Developing Culturally Competent Data Publication Resources
Ryan Stoker, Gene Melzack, Jennifer McLean

Organising RDM and Open Science Services
Anne Sunikka

 

New/Recent Issue: Provenance

Volume 35, Number 1 (2018)

Front Matter
Heather Oswald

Articles

The Austin Archives Bazaar: A collaborative outreach event
Daniel Alonzo, Amy Rushing, and Kristy Sorensen

“No Rhyme or Reason:” Surveying Legislative Records Retention Practices in the U.S. House of Representatives
Nahali R. Croft

The Library of Virginia, Local Records, and the Civil War
Eddie Woodward

Recovering from Hurricane Sandy: A Municipal Government Archives Role in Disaster Recovery
Bryan J. Dickerson

Journeywoman: A Lone Arranger on the Final Frontier
Laura Frizzell

Book Reviews
Tommy Brown, Amanda Hawk, Joshua Kitchens, Muriel M. Jackson, and Shanee’ Yvette Murrain