Call for Applications: Editor, Associate Editor, and Book Reviews Editor, Provenance

Interested in harnessing your editorial skills and passion for organizing fellow writers to serve as editor of a well-established open source archival journal?

The Society of Georgia Archivists Nominating Committee is accepting applications for the roles of Editor, Associate Editor, and Book Reviews Editor for Provenance, the Journal of the Society of Georgia Archivists. Visit this link to view previous issues of the award-winning journal.

Candidates do not have to reside in the state of Georgia but must be members of the Society of Georgia Archivists.

The Provenance Editor manages the publication and distribution of at least one annual issue of Provenance and coordinates the selection of the David B. Gracy II Award recipient. The position is a three-year term appointed by SGA President with Executive Board approval. The time commitment is15 hrs/month on average, with additional work required around publication. See the attached PDF for a full list of major duties and responsibilities.

The Provenance Associate Editor assists the Editor in soliciting, editing, and production of Provenance. The position is a three-year term. Appointed by Editor with Executive Board approval. The time commitment: 5-8 hrs/month on average, with additional work required around publication.

DUTIES:

  • Solicits articles for inclusion in Provenance.

  • Reviews articles as assigned by the Editor.

  • Assists in copy and final editing considering content, quality, and style set by journal requirements. (could be done by a separate copy editor)

  • Works with contributors as assigned.

  • Assists Editor with use and management of Bepress system.

  • Oversees marketing of Provenance, including advertising and exhibiting at professional meetings.

  • Oversees publication of Provenance issues to the e-commerce platform

  • Manages fees and income associated with e-commerce platform

The Provenance Book Review Editor solicits critical assessments of books, software, websites, and other tools useful to the archival profession. The position is a three-year term. Appointed by Editor with Executive Board approval. The time commitment: 5-10 hrs/month on average, with additional work required around publication.

DUTIES:

  • Solicits and selects, with advice from the Editor, publications or other relevant content to be reviewed for inclusion in each issue of Provenance.

  • Arranges for reviewers of each identified publication or other content.

  • Coordinates with reviewers; provides guidelines and determines deadline for submission.

  • Edits the text of all reviews submitted for inclusion and submits final product to the Editor.

  • Sends PDF copy of each review to the author and the publisher of the book.

TO APPLY

Applications will be accepted to nominating@soga.org until November 9, 2020. Applicants should submit a statement of interest explaining their experience editing; a writing sample; and a resume/CV. Questions may be addressed to nominating@soga.org.

Call for Presentations: 2021 Reference Research Forum at ALA Annual

The Research & Statistics Committee of the Reference Services Section of the Reference & User Services Association (RUSA) invites submission of reference service research project proposals for presentation at the New Discoveries in Reference: The 27th Annual Reference Research Forum at the 2021 American Library Association Annual Conference in Chicago, IL.

Researchers and practitioners from all types of libraries, library school faculty and students, and other interested individuals are encouraged to submit a proposal. The committee is particularly interested in research about serving diverse patrons.

The Reference Research Forum is a popular and valuable ALA Annual Conference program. Attendees have the opportunity to learn about innovative research projects conducted in reference services including user behavior, electronic services, reference effectiveness and assessment, and organizational structure and personnel. For examples of projects presented at past Forums, please see the Committee’s website.

The Committee employs a blind peer review process to select three proposals for 20-minute presentations, followed by open discussion. Identifying information will not be shared with reviewers until after final selection of proposals. Selected submissions must be presented in person at the Forum during ALA Annual in Chicago, IL.

Criteria for selection:

  • Originality: Potential for research to fill a gap in reference knowledge or to build on previous studies
  • Quality: Research design and methodologies
  • Impact: Significance of the study for improving the quality of reference service

NOTE: Research projects may be in-progress or completed. Previously published research or research accepted for publication will not be accepted.

Important Dates:

Proposals are due by Monday, January 4, 2021. Notification of acceptance will be made by Monday, February 15th, 2021. The submission must not exceed the stated word count limit.

Submission Details:

Submissions will be accepted as Word documents.

SUBMISSION PAGE 1: Contact Information
Please include the primary contact’s name, title, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and email address.  Additional research team members should also be noted in the appropriate field.

SUBMISSION PAGE 2: Research Description (250 Word maximum)
The research description must not include any personally identifiable information, including your name, or the name of your institution. Please include these elements:

  • Title of the project
  • Explicit statement of the research problem
  • Description of the research design and methodologies
  • Findings or results if available
  • Brief discussion of the originality, unique contribution, potential impact, and significance of the research (if you use semi colons between items in a list, you need to make sure the entire list is a complete sentence.)

Proposals that exceed the word count or that do not follow the format described above will be automatically rejected.

Questions about the Forum should be directed to the 2020-2021 committee chair:

Qiana Johnson (q-johnson@northwestern.edu)

CFP: Catholic Library World (ongoing basis)

Though this call does not specifically mention archives, it is an opportunity for theological/religious archives to publish.

________________________

Submissions are being accepted on an ongoing basis for upcoming issues of Catholic Library World.

Catholic Library World is the official journal of the Catholic Library Association. Established in 1929, CLW is a peer reviewed association journal. CLW publishes articles focusing on all aspects of librarianship, especially as it relates to Catholic Studies and CatholicismCLW articles are intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various types of libraries, including, but not limited to academic, public, theological, parish and church libraries, and school libraries.

The preferred method for submitting manuscripts is as a word-processed attachment in e-mail. Author’s full name, affiliation, and e-mail address must accompany any manuscript submission.

Articles should provide something new to the existing literature. The word count should be 3500- 5000 words and should adhere to The Chicago Manual of Style (humanities is preferred). The style should be accessible and well-documented.

For more information, visit: https://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications

Send submissions and queries to: Sigrid Kelsey, General Editor, sigridkelsey@gmail.com

Oral History Association Awards

2020 OHA Award Winners

Article Award

Henry Greenspan’s article, “The Humanities of Contingency: Interviewing and Teaching Beyond “Testimony” with Holocaust Survivors,” [Oral History Review 46:2(Summer/Fall, 2019), 360-379] contributes to socio/historical inquiry goes beyond the collection of testimonies from Holocaust survivors. Greenspan’s call to engage with testimony beyond the collection of experiences takes the practice of oral history into an even more dynamic practice where the actual people become 3D characters. It calls for an engagement with the people with the stories and even the reader’s or interviewer’s own positionality or understanding of the topic.

Book Award

The Oral History Association Book Award committee enthusiastically names Nepia Mahuika’s exceptional book Rethinking Oral History and Tradition: An Indigenous Perspective as the winner of the 2020 prize. We also wish to recognize Jacquelyn Dowd Hall’s, Sisters and Rebels: A Struggle for the Soul of America, with an honorable mention. In addition to embodying the very best in the practice of oral history, both books were inspiring to read in this unsettling time.

Rethinking Oral History and Tradition provokes a thoroughgoing decolonization of our conception of the field of oral history by demonstrating that indigenous oral accounts are oral history. Focusing on a case study of the Maori in Aotearoa, New Zealand, the book confronts a longstanding problem: the condescending and dismissive stance of non-indigenous professional oral historians and other scholars, who have relegated Maori oral accounts to the realm of myth rather than respecting indigenous practices as legitimate forms of oral history. Drawing on sixty interviews he conducted within his tribe (Ngāti Porou), Mahuika recasts oral history as a dynamic, organic, and multi-generational exchange within indigenous cultures that takes place within the context of people’s daily lives. He shows that a lack of attention to the nuance of language partly explains why Maori oral accounts have been relegated to the realm of “oral tradition” and discounted in the reconstruction of Maori history.  Scholars simply did not understand the significant role metaphors play in their language. Ultimately, Mahuika’s elegant and refreshing book makes the case for not shoehorning an indigenous perspective into the existing field, but for totally reimagining and broadening the field of oral history.

Sisters and Rebels is a page-turner about two women’s complicated and noble mission to transform the region of their birth and the United States as a whole. Drawing on oral history interviews Hall conducted over the course of nearly fifty years, the book tells the individual and intertwined stories of three remarkable sisters from a former southern slaveowning family, Elizabeth, Grace, and Katherine Lumpkin. While Elizabeth clings to the Lost Cause ideology she imbibed in their youth, Grace and Katherine rebelled against and transcended the racism and mythology of their southern upbringing to fight for justice and women’s liberation. Sisters and Rebels is the work of a giant of the field that not only demonstrates Hall’s skill and sensitivity as an interviewer, but also restores readers’ faith that individuals can cast off the destructive ideologies of their childhoods to help transform society in meaningful ways.

Mason Multi-Media Awards

Refugee Boulevard: Making Montreal Home After the Holocaust creatively documents narrators’ stories through a survivor-led historical audio tour, and accompanying booklet and website available in French and English. Building on long-standing relationships with survivors, new multi-session interviews were conducted to connect stories of experiences from 1948 within neighborhood sites. The audiowalk features the voices of six War Orphans Project storytellers and the narrator, all of whom were Holocaust refugees. Voices are integrated with music and soundscapes that enhance the listener’s experience. The accompanying booklet is designed well and enriches the audiowalk with the map, historical photographs and text. Notably, the Refugee Boulevard project currently reaches the community through collaborative partnerships with two museums, as well as informs curriculum for teaching Canadian Studies and History at two Montreal universities. This beautifully conceived and executed project provides a great sense of the power of oral history for contributing to the historical record through community engagement.

Authors: Stacey Zembrzycki, Eszter Andor, Nancy Rabelo and Anna Sheftel

Voices of Virginia: An Auditory Primary Source Reader compiles oral histories across five decades and from twenty repositories into an open-access reader for high school and college students. The reader is organized well by topic, time period, and description, and offers easy links for downloading or listening to the seventy interview excerpts. The audio files were licensed through a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial ShareAlike 4.0 license. Content in the Reader is aligned with the History and Social Science Standards for Virginia Public Schools. Section I includes transcripts, context, and discussion questions. Section II offers six lesson plans. This replicable project demonstrates the power of oral history, offers new ways to think about the state’s history through diverse voices of narrators, and broadens access to archived interviews.

Author: Jessica Taylor

The Wisconsin Farms Oral History Project: Lands We Share initiative showcased oral histories in a unique way with a traveling exhibition and community conversation tour at twelve venues throughout the state. Oral histories conducted at five farm sites were highlighted in the exhibit and radio series broadcasts. The stories encompassed some of Wisconsin’s rich cultural diversity and history, including the Oneida Indians, Hmong immigrants, agricultural wage laborers from Mexico and Laos, African-American community activists, and multi-generational German immigrants. Notably, the organizers extended the exhibit’s possibilities by including interactive elements for visitors at each community location, including a culmination farm dinner and conversation. The Lands We Share reached almost 3,000 exhibit visitors, 600 guests at community dinners, and over 100,000 radio listeners. Partnerships and collaborations with communities from the initial oral history project were extended from the Lands We Share initiative and have inspired subsequent oral histories and possibilities for curriculum development.

Author: Stephen Kercher

Postsecondary Teaching Award

Professor Ricia Anne Chansky’s Mi María: Puerto Rico after the Hurricane showed the strength of a dual language project that was fully transcribed and translated. The committee was impressed in the interdisciplinary approach to this subject matter at a primarily STEM focused institution. Her integration of oral history with this general education course through the Department of English creativity allowed a group of newly trained students to engage with the practice. The ongoing civic engagement with the community created a place for survivors to reflect and archive their collective memories. Professor Chansky provided the “ethics of care for my students” in these dire circumstances to facilitate this project. Students in turn found solace in their collective experience and rapport beyond the classroom assignment with their narrators. In these dire conditions with limited access to electricity, this project succeeded that marked our scores high in “civic or community component.” The standard of this collection sets a precedence for future collections at this and other institutions.

Emerging Crisis

Ricia Chansky’s “Mi María” project is a large-scale public humanities project that uses oral history and other biographical methodologies—contextualized in critical disaster studies and environmental humanities—to study the impacts of Hurricane María on the people of Puerto Rico while working to resituate the national narrative from stories about the people to those by the people. This new phase of the project, “Sheltered in Place,” works to understand connections between the climate emergency and the public health crisis of Covid-19 in marginalized and underserved communities that are disproportionately impacted by both. A secondary objective of this project is to devise methods for creatively listening to and circulating life stories in a time of necessitated physical distancing.

Sierra Holt’s project is to produce an oral history of the descendants of the community who live in or near Lambert Lands. Lambert Lands became the home of newly emancipated people from Bedford County, Virginia in 1843. After establishing their settlement, this group obtained a deed, built a church, and developed the oldest Emancipation celebration, which continues today. They also were a stopping point for those escaping slavery in the South.  Since its creation, the legacy of Lambert Lands has continued despite threats of violence from the Klu Klux Klan, growing poverty in Appalachia, and numerous drug epidemics.  To fully comprehend the history of this community, Holt will also research and interview distant relatives who hold knowledge of the community’s origins in Bedford County, Virginia. For preservation, the results of these interviews will be donated to a library or archive housed at an academic institution or museum, particularly one that is focused on Southern and/or Appalachian Black history.

CFP: Conference on Academic Library Management

This call does not specifically mention archives or special collections, but it is an opportunity for managers in those areas to share accomplishments.

__________________

The inaugural Conference on Academic Library Management (CALM), taking place the week of March 15, 2021, invites proposals for virtual presentations that inform and inspire the practice and application of management in academic libraries. This conference is geared towards current middle managers, administrators, coordinators, and those who aspire to take on those roles. We will focus on person-centered management practices that aim toward creating more just and inclusive workplaces.

We invite either 60-minute presentations or 10-minute lightning talks on all topics related to library management, including but not limited to encompassing tips and advice, practical application, research, and learning from failures, in any area, especially:

  • Budget / fiscal planning and expenditures
  • Hiring practices and policies
  • Crisis and emergency management
  • Communication and transparency
  • Advocacy and relationship building
  • Time management and work life balance
  • Anti-racist management practices and policies
  • Supervision, evaluation, and other personnel topics
  • Organizational climate and culture, retention, and growth
  • Career planning, professional development, and mentoring
  • Management without authority and managing up and side-ways
  • Decision-making
  • Diversity, equity, accessibility, and inclusion
  • Team building and team cultivation
  • Motivation and empowerment

Proposal and Conference Timeline:

  • Proposals due: December 15, 2020
  • Notification of accepted proposals: Week of January 15, 2021
  • Conference: Week of March 15, 2021

Proposals can be submitted using this Google form.

If you have any questions or comments, let us know at CALMConf@gmail.com.

CFP: Chesapeake DH Consortium

The Chesapeake Digital Humanities Consortium Steering Committee is excited to announce that the #CDHC2021 Call for Proposals is now open! Our theme for 2021 is Social Justice and Online Activism. This event will be all-virtual over two half-day sessions on February 25th and 26th, 2021. All events will be free of charge.

We encourage participation from the broader digital humanities communities, including undergraduate and graduate students, college and university faculty, independent scholars, community members, librarians, archivists, and technologists. Within the larger theme of Social Justice and Online Activism, we encourage submissions within the following areas:

-COVID-19
-Race and Racial Inequities
-Social Media and Mobilization
-Automating Inequality (cf. Automating Inequality; e.g. flaws of fraud detection, decision-support software vis-a-vis inequality)
-Algorithmic Bias (cf. Algorithms of Oppression)
-Bias in AI and Machine Learning
-Digital Archives Power (cf. Archives Power)
-Cybertypes (cf. Nakamura’s Cybertypes)
-Crowdsourcing DH projects
-Hashtag activism
-Inclusive DH pedagogy
-DH for social good

You may submit your proposals directly here: https://forms.gle/yo8ACeTgb93pX1gy5

Proposals are due November 31st at 11:59 pm ET.

For more information on topics, proposal types, and conference details, see our website at https://chesapeakedh.github.io/conference-2021

If you have questions or comments please don’t hesitate to reach out to us at chesapeakedhconsortium@gmail.com.

Please share widely. We look forward to your proposals!

Best,
CDHC Steering and Program Committee

**
Sherri Brown
Research Librarian for English
University of Virginia Library | Kerchof 102
slb4kt@virginia.edu | 919.434.7801

Journal of Western Archives Seeks New Editor

The Journal of Western Archives is seeking a new managing editor. The managing editor is responsible for the overall quality of the intellectual content of the journal and works closely with the editorial board to ensure that the needs of the professional community (including the journal’s four regional sponsors) in the western United States are met. If you are interested in this position, please submit a CV and a letter of interest to journal director Gordon Daines at gordon_daines@byu.edu by Monday November 2nd at 5:00 pm MST. The successful applicant will assume their duties on January 1st, 2021 and receive a yearly honorarium of $500.00. The initial term will be for three years with the opportunity to renew once.

Journal of Western Archives Editor

Job Description

The Editor is responsible for the overall quality of the intellectual content of the journal and for overseeing the review process to ensure it is thorough, fair, and timely. The Editor is responsible for upholding the mission and scope of the journal and for selecting papers that provide new, original, and important contributions to knowledge.

Responsibilities

  1. The Editor oversees the mission and scope of the journal in consultation with the journal director and the editorial board.
    1. The Editor ensures that the papers published are consistent with the editorial mission.
    2. The Editor works with the journal director and the editorial board to determine if thematic issues should be published. The Editor identifies and invites potential guest editors for these issues.
    3. The Editor works with the technical editor/layout specialist to ensure that content is visually appealing and readable.
  2. The Editor is responsible for overseeing the peer review process.
    1. The Editor selects editorial board members to shepherd potential articles and case studies through the peer review process.
    2. The Editor and assigned editorial board members will use the BePress platform to conduct the editorial review process.
    3. The Editor will review the feedback from peer reviewers and the assigned editorial board member and will make the final decision regarding acceptance or rejection of articles and case studies.
    4. The Editor will ensure that the peer review process is completed in a timely way and that authors receive constructive feedback about papers submitted.
  3. The Editor is responsible for overseeing the copy editing process
    1. The Editor will work with the journal’s contract copy editor to ensure that articles and case studies are copy edited in a timely fashion.
    2. The Editor has final authority on all copy editing decisions.
  4. The Editor will seek opportunities to promote the journal.
    1. The Editor will seek to speak at conferences and other events about the purpose and values of the journal, inviting potential contributors to consider submitting papers to the journal.
    2. The Editor will encourage editorial board members to speak at conferences and other events about the purpose and values of the journal, inviting potential contributors to consider submitting papers to the journal.

Qualifications

Required

  • Excellent oral and written communications skills
  • Must have the technical capacity to work in a fully electronic environment
  • Experience in conducting and writing research, sufficient to enable the individual to solicit and select research that will result in a high-quality publication that addresses the diverse interest of the readership
  • Dynamic, self-motivated individual
  • Ability to delegate
  • Strong organizational skills
  • Ability to set and meet firm deadlines
  • Strong interpersonal skills and the ability to work in a team environment

Preferred

  • Experience with the peer review process as both a peer reviewer and an author
  • Membership in one of the four sponsoring regional associations (Conference of Intermountain Archivists, Society of Rocky Mountain Archivists, the Society of California Archivists, or the Northwest Archivists, Inc.
  • Familiarity with and ability to use the Chicago Manual of Style

Call for Proposals/Abstracts: Nomadic Archivists Project

CALL FOR PROPOSALS/ABSTRACTS
The Nomadic Archivists Project (NAP) is seeking submissions for The Evidence: Black Archivists Holding Memory, an anthology exploring the archival experience across Africa and the African Diaspora. We understand that the global Black archival experience is a complex one and converging over time, space, and memory. We acknowledge and affirm archiving our stories is a cultural and political act.

Archivists rarely share their experiences as archivists. The Evidence is a platform to tell these unique and powerful stories within the context of the Black archival tradition.

Subjects may include: archiving memory, agency in the archives, archival labor, combating racism in the archives, community archives and spaces, decolonizing the archives, digital archives and archiving, legacy makers, origins stories, personal testimonies, queer voices, understanding pain in the archives, women and gender in the archives. We welcome other ideas as well.

This anthology takes its inspiration from the legacy of past pioneering archivists, curators, librarians, and scholars such as Regina Anderson Andrews, Brenda Banks, Abdel Kader Haidara, Jean Blackwell Hutson, Alexander Gumby, Sara Dunlap Jackson, Michel-Rolph Trouillot, Dorothy Porter, Arthur Schomburg, Marion Stokes, and many others who left an indelible mark on archiving the global Black experience.

We welcome archivists, artists, curators, historians, memory workers, public record keepers, scholars and students to participate in this groundbreaking project. Please read the guidelines listed below. The deadline for submitting a proposal or abstract is December 15, 2020. If your submission is selected for the anthology, we will inform you no later than February 28, 2021.

Proposals/abstracts should be between 350-500 words in length. Submissions are limited to: research articles, personal essays, creative pieces, interviews and visuals.

We look forward to reading your submissions.

Editors: Miranda Mims and Steven G. Fullwood, Nomadic Archivists Project (NAP)

Please submit proposals here:
For inquiries: www.nomadicarchivistsproject.com/contact
Website: www.nomadicarchivistsproject.com

CFP: Scholarly Editing

Scholarly Editing: 2021 Call for Submissions

Scholarly Editing: The Annual of the Association for Documentary Editing is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal for the advancement and promotion of editorial theory, practice, and pedagogy. Learn more about the journal by clicking here.

Editors in Chief Noelle Baker and Kathryn Tomasek invite submissions for the 2021 publication of Scholarly Editing, Issue 39. We welcome essays on the theory, practice, and pedagogy of scholarly editing, reviews of print and digital editions, and small-scale editions of understudied authors and texts that reflect our diverse and multifaceted cultural heritage.

The journal intends to represent contributions from all countries and cultures and across disciplines, including but not restricted to educators, researchers, scholars, historians, archivists, curators, editors, information professionals, students, and digital humanists. We particularly welcome submissions from and about the Global South, Black people, Indigenous people, People of Color, women, and other marginalized and underrepresented groups within the field of scholarly editing.

Direct all questions about submission and peer review to Managing Editor Robert Riter at rbriter@ua.edu. For further information about technical specifications, content, and house style, click this link.

The deadline for submissions is December 22, 2020.

Find out more information on Scholarly Editing‘s website: https://scholarlyediting.org/

Archives & Manuscripts Publication Award Winners

Sigrid McCausland Emerging Writers Award

We are pleased to announce the 2019 recipients of the Archives & Manuscripts Sigrid McCausland Emerging Writers Award. The award recognises the work of emerging writers who have published an article in the journal. Each year the members of Archives & Manuscripts Editorial Board decide the winner of this award, which features a $1000 cash payment.

Congratulations to the 2019 recipients of the Archives & Manuscripts Sigrid McCausland Emerging Writers Award – Sharon Huebner and Stella Marr for their article ‘Between Policy and Practice: Archival Descriptions, Digital Returns and a place for coalescing narratives’ published in Volume 47, Number 1.

Citation:

This is a very powerful article that uses the instance of the Strathfieldsaye Estate collection at the University of Melbourne Archives as a way of opening out questions of how mainstream archiving practice can productively engage with Indigenous epistemologies. It shows how shared custodianship of cultural heritage can provide new ways to understand the meaning and significance of materials that have previously only been understood within the colonial historical record. This article contributes to important and timely debates around decolonising the archive and the politics of ownership. It also shows how critical heritage materials are to healing, to community and to cultural activism.

Mander Jones Award

Congratulations to the 2019 Mander Jones Award recipients who were presented with an Award or Commendation certificate and Judges’ Comments at the Mander Jones Awards ceremony, held after the Annual General Meeting on 18 September 2020 in the Dixson Room, State Library of New South Wales.

Award Recipients

Category 1A:  (Not awarded)

Category 1B:   Kirsten Thorpe, ‘Transformative Praxis – Building Spaces for Indigenous Self-Determination in Libraries and Archives’, in In The Library With The Lead Pipe.

Category 2A: Clive Smith, Port Macquarie’s Last Convicts: the end of the convict establishment at Port Macquarie as told by the original documents

Category 2B: Cate O’Neill, ‘The shifting significance of child endowment records at the National Archives of Australia’, in Archival Science, Vol 19, issue 3, 2019, pp. 235-253

Category 3: Terry Kass, ‘Unlocking land: A guide to Crown Land Records held at State Archives NSW’

Category 4: Iain Wallace & Sandra Funnell, ‘Fort Street Tours App

Category 5: Kirsten Wright, ‘Archival Interventions and the language we use’, in Archival Science Vol. 19, No. 4 (December 2019, published online May 2019), pp. 331-348

Category 6: Gregory Rolan, Joanne Evans, Rhiannon Abeling, Aedan Brittain, Elizabeth Constable, Matthew Kelemen, & Ella Roberts, ‘Voice, agency and equity: deep community collaboration in record-keeping research’ in Information Research, Vol. 24 , No. 3, 2019

Category 7: (Not awarded)

Category 8: Vanessa Finney, ‘Capturing Nature: Early Scientific Photography at the Australian Museum 1857-1893’

Commendation Recipients

Category 2B Joint: Tony James Brady, ‘The Empire has an Answer: The Empire Air Training Scheme as reported in the Australian Press 1939-1945’

Category 2B Joint: Tiffany Shellam, ‘Meeting the Waylo: Aboriginal encounters in the archipelago’

Category 3: Narrelle Morris, ‘Japanese war crimes in the Pacific: Australia’s investigations and prosecutions’

Category 5: Joanne Evans, Sue McKemmish, and Gregory Rolan, ‘Participatory information governance: Transforming recordkeeping for childhood out-of-home Care’ in Records Management Journal, Vol. 29, No. 1/2, 2019, pp. 178-193

Category 6: Evanthia Samaras and Andrew Johnston, ‘Off-Lining to Tape Is Not Archiving: Why We Need Real Archiving to Support Media Archaeology and Ensure Our Visual Effects Legacy Thrives’ in Leonardo, Vol. 52, No. 4, 2019, pp. 374-380

Visit the Mander Jones Awards Recipients page to read the judges comments for each award.