CFP: KULA Special Issue: Indigenous Knowledges

Call for Papers – Special Issue: Indigenous Knowledges

KULA: Knowledge Creation, Dissemination, and Preservation Studies
Special Issue: Indigenous Knowledges

Guest Editors
Ry Moran, Director, National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation

Carey Newman, OBC, Multidisciplinary Artist, Master Carver, and Audain Professor of Contemporary Art Practice of the Pacific Northwest in the Department of Visual Arts, University of Victoria

Shelagh Rogers, OC, Broadcast Journalist, Host and a producer of CBC Radio’s The Next Chapter, Honorary Witness for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, and Chancellor, University of Victoria

Andrea Walsh, PhD, Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Victoria

Guest Advisor
Rob Hancock, PhD, LE,NOṈET Academic Manager, Office of Indigenous Academic and Community Engagement and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Environmental Studies, University of Victoria

Editorial Assistant
Samantha MacFarlane, PhD, Associate Editor, KULA: Knowledge Creation, Dissemination, and Preservation Studies and Publications Assistant, University of Victoria Libraries

Abstracts and expressions of interest: rolling, through 30 November 2019
Notice of acceptance of abstracts: February 2020
Deadline for final submissions: June 2020
Anticipated publication: Spring 2021

Contact email: kulajournal@uvic.ca

KULA: Knowledge Creation, Dissemination, and Preservation Studies (https://kula.uvic.ca/) is a peer-reviewed, open-access online journal that publishes multidisciplinary scholarship about the creation, dissemination, and preservation of knowledge. We invite abstracts for contributions to a special issue of KULA on Indigenous Knowledges, to be published in 2021.

The Building Reconciliation Forum is an annual national forum that works toward implementing the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action within post-secondary institutions. In November 2018, the University of Victoria hosted the fourth annual forum, the theme of which was Ts’its’u’ watul tseep, a Hul’q’umi’num teaching that means “to help one another.” In direct response to the forum, as part of its commitment to implementing the TRC’s Calls to Action in universities, the University of Victoria Libraries made “Building Reconciliation through Archives” the topic of its annual University Librarian’s Lecture. The 2019 lecture presented a panel discussion with Ry Moran, Carey Newman, and Shelagh Rogers about the past, present, and future of Indigenous documentary heritage. The panelists considered questions such as: What is the relationship between documentary heritage and oral history, land, and historical context? Does ceremony have a role in animating archives? Should documentary heritage held by institutions be returned to communities? How can our approach to Indigenous archives deepen our understanding of the meaning of truth and reconciliation?

Some of the issues the panelists raised during this discussion include:

  • the complicity of archives in the deliberate, violent erasure of Indigenous languages and cultures and the myth of archives as an antidote to the “loss” of cultural heritage
  • the importance of living heritage, particularly the knowledge of Elders (e.g., in addressing inaccuracies in colonial narratives about the history of land and land use, which are preserved in the written record of agencies such as Parks Canada), and the need to create space in libraries and archives for the preservation of intangible cultural heritage as well as documentary heritage
  • the Indigenous perspective of land as a source of knowledge and wisdom, connected to culture, language, and world view–a kind of archival record–and environmental destruction as a threat to the land and the knowledge it holds.
  • the challenge of building a future based on reconciliation when many non-Indigenous people still do not understand Canada’s colonial history or how the concentric harms of colonial genocide continue to affect the lives Indigenous Peoples
  • the various ways that individual Indigenous communities view ownership of tangible objects/land and intangible stories/songs

This special issue is inspired by the panelists’ discussion, and it aims to expand the scope of that conversation by considering the broader category of Indigenous Knowledges. We have deliberately titled the issue Indigenous Knowledges, and we seek to include a range of diverse contributions that reflect this plurality, both in subject and format. We encourage submissions on diverse aspects of Indigenous Knowledges and ways of knowing, including but not limited to:

  • Language; language revitalization; translation
  • Art, literature, and music
  • Governance, laws, Protocols, and justice systems
  • Educational systems
  • Traditional Knowledges, including medicinal and environmental knowledge
  • Oral Traditions
  • Spiritual beliefs and practices
  • Preservation, protection, and custodianship of documentary heritage, intangible cultural heritage, and cultural and ceremonial sites
  • Repatriation of documentary and cultural heritage, including ceremonial objects and human remains
  • Ethics of exhibiting and digitising documentary and cultural heritage; the right to privacy
  • Teaching methods in elementary, secondary, and post-secondary education, including content development and best practices for teaching curricula about the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and Treaties and Indigenous rights
  • Librarianship
  • Methods, politics, and ethics of data collection and access to data related to Indigenous Peoples
  • Research practices and methodologies
  • Knowledge systems and policy design in academic and research institutions
  • Editing and publishing
  • Media
  • Health and healthcare
  • Gender and sexuality
  • Architecture
  • Histories of suppressed or destroyed knowledge
  • Citational practices and politics

We are seeking contributions in diverse formats: short- to medium-length scholarly articles; book reviews; project reports; teaching reflections and syllabi; and creative text, image, video, and audio pieces. We invite submissions that incorporate or propose innovative citational practices. We also welcome submissions from youth contributors. Please note that proposals about any non-Indigenous-led projects that do not express clear Indigenous participation, consultation, and relationship from inception will not be considered.

Please submit abstracts of 300-500 words to kulajournal@uvic.ca by 30 November 2019. Based on these abstracts, we will then invite authors to submit full pieces for editorial consideration and, if applicable, peer review.

KULA is an open-access journal requiring no author publication charges (APCs). Authors retain full copyright to their works, which will be published under a Creative Commons license: https://kula.uvic.ca/about/submissions/

CFP: Special Library Association Contributed Papers

SLA Contributed Papers

The inspiration for a paper can come from almost anywhere. A hackfest. A Twitter chat. A conversation with a researcher or library user.

Each year, as many as 12 SLA members are invited to write and present papers at the SLA Annual Conference. The paper topics are chosen through a competitive selection process. Three or four of the papers are presented each day of the conference, thereby offering conference attendees multiple opportunities to hear directly from their peers about experiences they’ve had, research they’ve conducted, and best practices they’ve developed.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ACCEPTANCE
Paper topics should address library science, information management, or other issues related to customer service, technology, or administration in special libraries. Proposals will be judged on several criteria, including the applicability of the topic to SLA members, the clarity of scope, the potential for take-away ideas and concepts, and the quality of the writing.

Proposed papers must also meet these requirements:

  • At least one author is a member of SLA.
  • At least one author commits to presenting the paper at the annual conference.
  • The proposal is received by the deadline.
  • The paper has not been published in, or submitted to, any other publication or conference planning group.
  • The author (and any co-authors) must be willing to sign a copyright assignment form that will permit SLA to use the paper in various formats.

SUBMISSION PROCESS
Abstract submission: Paper authors must submit an abstract describing the topic of their paper. Abstracts should be 250-300 words in length, which is roughly one page in 12-point text. The abstract deadline for papers to be presented at the SLA 2020 Annual Conference is Friday, 13 December 2019. Send abstracts to Stuart Hales at SLA headquarters (shales@sla.org).
Paper selection: As many as 12 abstracts will be chosen for development into papers. All SLA members who submit abstracts will be notified of a decision no later than the end of January 2020.
Paper submission: Authors will submit their completed paper and copyright assignment form to Stuart Hales at SLA headquarters. The submission deadline is Friday, 8 May 2020.
Paper presentation: Authors will deliver a 15-minute presentation of their papers during a session at the SLA 2020 Annual Conference in Charlotte, N.C.

Authors whose proposals are selected for development into contributed papers should follow the guidelines below when writing their papers. Authors may also wish to view papers presented at previous SLA Annual Conferences to see how certain formatting challenges were addressed.

Specific questions should be referred to Stuart Hales at shales@sla.org.

STYLE
Length: Papers may be as long as necessary; however, paper presentations at the conference will be limited to 15 minutes.
Style: The Chicago Manual of Style (University of Chicago Press) should be consulted on all questions about editorial style. In particular, authors should review the chapter about using the author-date style for citations and reference lists, which explains the preferred approach to text and source citations.
Editing/Proofreading: Papers must be in final form when submitted; no editing will be permitted after papers are received. Authors are responsible for arranging for copy editing, proofreading and formatting.

TYPOGRAPHY
Papers should be set in Times New Roman type, as follows:
Title: The title of the paper should be centered at the top of the first page (no blank lines between margin and title) in bold 18-point Times New Roman, with the first letter of each significant word capitalized.
Byline: Authors’ names, titles, degrees, and affiliations should appear below the title of the paper in regular 14-point Times New Roman, centered, with the first letter of each significant word capitalized.
Headings: Chapter or major division headings should be in bold 16-point Times New Roman type, centered, with the first letter of each significant word capitalized. A-level subheadings should be in bold 14-point Times New Roman, centered, with all capital letters. B-level subheadings should be in bold 14-point Times New Roman, centered, with the first letter of each significant word capitalized. C-level subheadings should be in bold 12-point Times New Roman, flush with the left margin. The first letter of each significant word should be capitalized. D-level subheadings should be flush to the left margin in italic (not bold) 12-point Times New Roman, followed by a period. The subheading should in line with the first line of the paragraph. Only the first letter of each significant word should be capitalized.
Endnotes: The heading of the endnotes section should be titled “Endnotes” and set in bold 16-point Times New Roman type, centered.

FORMATTING
Pagination: Do not number the pages. In particular, do not use the “page break before” or “page break after” commands or the header or footer fields.
Margins: All four margins should be set to one inch.
Justification: Do not justify text. All text, except where specified otherwise (e.g., titles and bylines), should be flush left, ragged right.
Spacing: Single-space the text of your paper. Between paragraphs, include a single blank line. Use two blank lines between the end of a section and a following A-, B-, or C-level subheading; use one blank line between an A-, B-, or C-level subheading and the following text. Use only one space between sentences.
Indentation: Indent all paragraphs one-half inch (1.3 cm) using tabs, not spaces.
Authors: Each author’s name, title, degree, and affiliation should be centered below the title of the paper, with the first letter of each significant word capitalized. Insert two blank lines between the last line of the title and the first line of the lead author’s name. The author’s name and degree(s) should be on one line; the author’s title, employer and affiliation should appear below. Insert one blank line between the first author’s credentials and the second author’s name. Insert four blank lines between the last line of the last author’s name and the first line of text (or the first chapter heading).
Subheadings: Subheads should be no more than one-half line long. Do not number subheads.
Widows and Orphans: Try to avoid letting the last line of a paragraph fall by itself at the beginning of the following page (widow) or the first line of a paragraph fall by itself at the end of the preceding page (orphan). Hint: Use the settings in your word processing application to eliminate widows and orphans.
Hyphenation: Do not hyphenate words at the ends of lines. Hint:Use the settings in your word processing application to turn off automatic hyphenation.

GRAPHICS
Authors are encouraged to use charts, tables, maps, and other useful non-text elements to help amplify or clarify text in their papers. Number the illustrations, graphs, charts, and other graphics consecutively as Figure 1, Figure 2, and so on and refer to them as such in the text of the paper. If you create graphs or other illustrations in another application (such as PowerPoint), do not embed them as objects linked to the original file.
Note: If an image is under copyright, it is the author’s responsibility to obtain the proper permissions and provide proof of the permissions to SLA. Copyright and attribution information must be included in the captions for all images used by permission.

HYPERLINKS
Authors are encouraged to use hyperlinks/bookmarks for cross references within the paper or to related online information. Do not link to other documents that reside on your computer, since those documents will not be available to online readers.

Journal of Western Archives Seeks New Editor

The Journal of Western Archives is seeking a new managing editor. The managing editor is responsible for the overall quality of the intellectual content of the journal and works closely with the editorial board to ensure that the needs of the professional community (including the journal’s four regional sponsors) in the western United States are met. If you are interested in this position, please submit a CV and a letter of interest to journal director Gordon Daines at gordon_daines@byu.edu by Monday December 16th at 5:00 pm MST. The successful applicant will assume their duties on January 1st, 2020 and receive a yearly honorarium of $500.00. The initial term will be for three years with the opportunity to renew once.

Journal of Western Archives Editor
Job Description

The Editor is responsible for the overall quality of the intellectual content of the journal and for overseeing the review process to ensure it is thorough, fair, and timely. The Editor is responsible for upholding the mission and scope of the journal and for selecting papers that provide new, original, and important contributions to knowledge.

Responsibilities:

  1. The Editor oversees the mission and scope of the journal in consultation with the journal director and the editorial board.
    1. The Editor ensures that the papers published are consistent with the editorial mission.
    2. The Editor works with the journal director and the editorial board to determine if thematic issues should be published. The Editor identifies and invites potential guest editors for these issues.
    3. The Editor works with the technical editor/layout specialist to ensure that content is visually appealing and readable.
  2. The Editor is responsible for overseeing the peer review process.
    1. The Editor selects editorial board members to shepherd potential articles and case studies through the peer review process.
    2. The Editor and assigned editorial board members will use the BePress platform to conduct the editorial review process.
    3. The Editor will review the feedback from peer reviewers and the assigned editorial board member and will make the final decision regarding acceptance or rejection of articles and case studies.
    4. The Editor will ensure that the peer review process is completed in a timely way and that authors receive constructive feedback about papers submitted.
  3. The Editor is responsible for overseeing the copyediting process
    1. The Editor will work with the journal’s contract copyeditor to ensure that articles and case studies are copyedited in a timely fashion.
    2. The Editor has final authority on all copyediting decisions.
  4. The Editor will seek opportunities to promote the journal.
    1. The Editor will seek to speak at conferences and other events about the purpose and values of the journal, inviting potential contributors to consider submitting papers to the journal.
    2. The Editor will encourage editorial board members to speak at conferences and other events about the purpose and values of the journal, inviting potential contributors to consider submitting papers to the journal.

Qualifications:

Required

  • Excellent oral and written communications skills
  • Must have the technical capacity to work in a fully electronic environment
  • Experience in conducting and writing research, sufficient to enable the individual to solicit and select research that will result in a high-quality publication that addresses the diverse interest of the readership
  • Dynamic, self-motivated individual
  • Ability to delegate
  • Strong organizational skills
  • Ability to set and meet firm deadlines
  • Strong interpersonal skills and the ability to work in a team environment

Preferred

  • Experience with the peer review process as both a peer reviewer and an author
  • Membership in one of the four sponsoring regional associations (Conference of Intermountain Archivists, Society of Rocky Mountain Archivists, the Society of California Archivists, or the Northwest Archivists, Inc.
  • Familiarity with and ability to use the Chicago Manual of Style

Call for Participation: Research Project/Survey on Accessioning

Hello!

My name is Meaghan O’Riordan and I’m the Accessioning Archivist at Emory’s Rose Library. I’m collaborating with Rosemary K. J. Davis, Accessioning Archivist at Yale’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, on a long-term research project focused on archival accessioning. We’re interested in making accessioning work more visible in every way, primarily by illuminating the sorts of labor and relationships required in order to steward archival collections during the initial phases of acquisition and accessioning. We want to ground our research in the firsthand experiences of people directly involved in this work.

To that end, we have crafted a survey that collects information and experiences related to the intellectual, emotional, and physical labors involved in archival accessioning.

https://yalesurvey.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0Vza9JzfyNvQSZ7

Developing a better understanding of how repositories define and navigate accessioning is crucial to performing special collections stewardship that is rooted in transparency and mutual trust between all parties, and ultimately results in richer archival description, faster processing of materials, and greater access for researchers. What’s more, raising the visibility of individuals performing accessioning work will hopefully contribute to the creation of an empathetic and engaged community of practice, while also making this work’s value more readily apparent throughout archival profession.

This survey will be open through December 20, 2019.

We encourage you to give yourself plenty of time to give specific and thoughtful answers. We’re interested in collecting information about the nuts and bolts of accessioning work, but we also want to hear about how this work is valued, how individuals navigate the complexities involved in their work, and how a more supportive community of practice might emerge.

Thank you all for your time and feel free to reach out to us with questions: accessioningresearch@gmail.com.

Meaghan O’Riordan
Accessioning Archivist
Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Rosemary K. J. Davis
Accessioning Archivist
Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University

Call for Book Chapter Proposals: Learning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries

Call for Book Chapter Proposals

Working titleLearning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries

Proposal submission deadline: January 27th, 2020

Editors: Arianne Hartsell-Gundy (Duke University), Kim Duckett (Duke University), Sarah Morris (University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill)

Publisher: Association of College & Research Libraries

Chapter proposals are invited for Learning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries, a book examining how academic librarians can best support interns, graduate assistants, and practicum and field experience students (both LIS and other fields). We welcome proposals focused on philosophical perspectives, practical strategies, reflective essays, and/or case studies. In addition to contributions from staff working in academic libraries, we welcome contributions from LIS faculty and current and recent graduate students.

Proposals are sought for chapters related to the following themes. Proposals should be between 250-300 words, and final chapters will be between 3000-4000 words.

Preparing Graduate Students for Professional Roles

This section will explore how internships, assistantships, practicums, and field experiences can support the learning of graduate students in order to help readers consider how these programs benefit graduate students and how they might want to structure such learning experience in their institutions. We hope to see explorations of skill-based training and discussions of how to most effectively mentor graduate students through hands-on work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • The role of internships, field experiences, and practicums in LIS or other forms of graduate education
  • Developing professional workplace skills (e.g: “soft skills,” time management, project management, workplace communication, reflective practice, self-awareness)
  • Preparing graduate students for the job search – job hunting, applying for professional positions, resume development, interview preparation

Logistics & Structures for Designing Graduate Student Work Experiences

This section will look at how to administer these types of positions and programs in order for readers to gain a bigger picture of what it takes to oversee this work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Strategies for structuring learning experiences for students (either programs or individualized experiences)
  • Interviewing, selecting and/or hiring
  • Developing a diverse and inclusive workforce and environment
  • Onboarding and approaches to training
  • Program assessment

Ethical Considerations

This section will examine the complex ethical issues surrounding these types of graduate experiences in order to help the reader consider how they will address these questions in their work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Issues surrounding paid versus unpaid labor
  • Ensuring students receive credit for their work (e.g. course credit, acknowledgement)
  • Issues related to balancing the organization’s needs and students’ learning and professional development needs

Managers’ Perspectives

This section will address the experience of the managers of these work experiences in order to give both new and seasoned managers insight into what these experiences will mean for them.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Tips for mentoring and coaching
  • The first-time manager perspective
  • Emotional labor, boundaries, and self-care
  • How to make it meaningful for you, your work, and your own professional goals

Students’ Perspectives

This section highlights LIS students’ perspectives on positive and negative aspects of their work experiences, and practical advice for making the most out of their internships, assistantships, etc.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Finding and designing meaningful graduate student work experience(s)
  • Strategies for self-advocacy
  • Perspectives on career-preparedness
  • Navigating workplace dynamics as a temporary employee
  • Balancing work responsibilities with coursework and life experiences

Submission Procedure

Proposals should be submitted as a single email attachment to learninginactionlibraries@gmail.com

Proposals should include:

  • Author name(s), institutional affiliation(s), job title(s)
  • Brief description of your experience as a graduate student or working with graduate students in academic libraries
  • Brief statement of your interests in professional writing
  • Clear description of the topic you are proposing for a potential chapter (about 250-300 words)

Important dates:

Proposals due: January 27th, 2020
Authors notified and sent chapter guidelines: March 15th, 2020
Full chapters due: June 29th, 2020
Final revised chapters due: November 16th, 2020

For additional information contact:

Arianne Hartsell-Gundy, Duke University Libraries: arianne.hartsell.gundy@duke.edu

CFP: “Evidence: The Use and Misuse of Data,” June 5, 2020, American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, PA

Inspired by its 2020 exhibition Dr. Franklin, Citizen Scientist, the American Philosophical Society Library & Museum is organizing a daylong symposium that explores the nature of evidence. The symposium reflects Benjamin Franklin’s many different uses of information and data throughout his life. His work with electricity relied on experimental data, while his work in oceanography relied on observed data as well as the incorporation of ideas borrowed from other observers. As a newspaper publisher and essayist, he produced and often reproduced news and other important information. Through his almanacs, he shared a wide range of knowledge with the public. Later in life, his service on a French commission investigating mesmerism deployed the scientific method to test the reliability of evidence itself. Given Franklin’s myriad uses of and approaches to evidence, the APS Library & Museum invites innovative proposals from scholars who wish to explore the past, present, and future use of evidence and data.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • The various ways evidence has been interpreted differently over time and the ways it has been applied and misapplied to shape policy and decisions;
  • The past, present, and future methods used to collect evidence and present findings, and the opportunities and potential problems associated with such methods;
  • The presence and misuse of bad data, erroneous evidence, and misinformation, and the ways such material have affected the production of knowledge and threaten it today;
  • The role of bias during data collection and its interpretation by scholars;
  • The opportunities and perils presented when evidence produces unexpected results.

Applicants should submit a title and a 250-word proposal along with a C.V. by December 13, 2019 via Interfolio: https://apply.interfolio.com/69616.

The symposium will be held on June 4-5, 2020 in Philadelphia. Decisions will be announced in February 2020. All presenters will receive travel subsidies and hotel accommodations. Accepted papers will be due a month before the conference and pre-circulated to registered attendees. Papers should be no longer than 15 double-spaced pages. Presenters may also have the opportunity to publish revised papers in the APS’s Proceedings, one of the longest running scholarly journals in America.

For more information, visit https://www.amphilsoc.org/, or contact Adrianna Link, Head of Scholarly Programs, at alink@amphilsoc.org.

CFP: Reorganization of the Library: Investigating the Consequences @LibJuicePress

This call does not specifically mention archives, but is relevant to academic archivists.

_________________________________

Call for Proposals

Reorganization of the Library: Investigating the Consequences
Edited by: Tim Ribaric

Library services are steeped in tradition and are built upon decades of past practice that have shaped the way patrons envision the library. These services also reinforce the mission of the library as a stalwart to the academic mission of the institution. However the library is not immune to change and this is being demonstrated in numerous contemporary library reorganizations that are occurring across academic institutions in North America and beyond. Quite often these exercises involve reorganizing staff and reporting lines in an attempt to find efficiencies and to provide new services. However, these reorganization exercises often create conflicts with established workflows, upend professional trajectories, and sometimes create labour issues. In addition, motivations and precipitating reasons for these exercises are often opaque and not clearly constructed. This work will investigate the current trend of library reorganization exercises, analyze the impacts, and investigate motivated factors.

Suggested Topics Include:

  • Case studies
  • Reorganization frameworks/methodologies
  • Organizational studies perspectives
  • Interrogation of ‘change management’ discourse
  • Bloat in quantity, and purview in administration positions
  • Deprofessionalization
  • Upskilling, changing roles, and continuing education
  • Equity, diversity, and inclusion perspectives
  • The effect of management trends and fads
  • Vocabularies and taxonomies (e.g. use of terminology such as “teams”)
  • Autonomy, professional identity and power-shifts
  • Longitudinal studies of effectiveness and effects
  • Exploration of rhetoric, “fear of change” dialog
  • Comparative studies of techniques and outcomes
  • The transition from liaison/subject librarianship to functional librarianship
  • Modeling library services on ‘market needs’
  • Discussions on neoliberalism in the academy and ramifications to Library services
  • Investigations of what is driving the neoliberal restructuring exercise
  • Strategic grievance filing
  • Self-governance mechanisms utilized in reorganization exercises

Estimated final submission length is between 5000 and 8000 words. The work will be published by Library Juice Press. Interested authors should provide a 500 word abstract to Tim Ribaric <tribaric@brocku.ca> before January 1, 2020. Notice of acceptance February 1. Submissions due: July 1. Anticipated publication date is Fall 2020.