Job Opportunity: Consultants for the Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents

The Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents (IEHD) seeks consultants to join its faculty and develop online and in-person training in editing and publishing historical documents. Topics covered will include but are not limited to the following:

  • collecting and cataloging documents
  • selecting which documents to publish
  • digitizing
  • transcribing, and proofreading
  • encoding
  • creating metadata
  • designing, researching and writing annotation
  • conceptualizing, organizing, and designing a publication (whether print or digital)

The IEHD has offered introductory training to small groups of scholars since 1972, and now seeks to expand its audience to include archivists, librarians, teachers, undergraduate students, genealogists, and family historians by creating a free online course to be called Fundamentals of Publishing Historical Documents. We are also designing advanced in-person workshops for further training and skills development.

The IEHD seeks to fill four faculty consultant positions. Faculty will help develop the online Fundamentals course, which will be launched in 2021. The faculty will work with other members of the IEHD in a series of four in-person curriculum workshops at the University of Virginia to conceptualize and develop the Fundamentals course. Each faculty member will be responsible for designing several modules and will contribute to the development of other faculty’s modules. The workshops will take place in summer and fall of 2020, and winter and summer of 2021.

Recognizing that not all who practice editing call themselves editors, we are committed to creating a faculty diverse in disciplinary background. Such a faculty will include practitioners outside the traditional field of editing, as well as practitioners focusing on underrepresented subjects and materials. We thus encourage not only scholarly editors to apply, but also public historians, archivists, and other individuals with experience in the preparation, publication, and promotion of historical records. Preference will be given to candidates with experience teaching in-person or online courses and with demonstrated experience using multiple publication platforms.

To be considered for this position, please send a cover letter and CV via email to Jennifer Stertzer at jes7z@virginia.edu. Deadline for applications is March 27, 2020.

The IEHD is funded by a grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission. Through this program, the NHPRC seeks to increase the number and diversity of historical documentary editors, disseminate knowledge about documentary editing, and build the capacity of attendees as leaders in their own editorial projects and in the related fields of documentary editing, digital history, and digital humanities.

NOTES:
4 openings.
Telecommuting is allowed.

CFP: Time/Location/Mode of Participation Changes: JCDL 2020 Practitioners Track

Due to the COVID-19 outbreak in Wuhan,  JCDL 2020 Organizing Committee has
made the following changes:

• Delay the conference date to August 1-5, 2020, which is right after ACM
SIGIR 2020 (July 25-30, 2020)
• Move the conference site to Xi’an China, which is at the same site as ACM
SIGIR 2020
• Allow virtual attendance/presentation of papers
• Not enforce the “no show” policy

These changes allow JCDL 2020 and SIGIR 2020 to be two conferences that are
back to back. Therefore, it is possible for attendees to attend two important
and relevant conferences with just one trip. The Organizing Committee of JCDL
2020 are working with that of SIGIR 2020 to explore further collaboration
between the two conferences.

JCDL 2020 continues to invite submissions to a newly created Practitioners
Track.

Practitioners Track Proposals

The practitioners track emphasizes innovation, insight, and vision in the
practice of digital libraries. It provides opportunities for libraries,
archives, museums, publishers, and digital content industry partners to
showcase their latest novel, speculative, and even provocative ideas,
practices, case studies, technologies, productions, strategies, datasets, and/
or designs related to digital library practices and services. Topics include
but are not limited to

• practice of emergency planning and response for libraries, archives, and
museums
• digital repositories
• digital collections development and management
• metadata and discovery services
• open access and scholarly communication
• open educational resources
• teaching and learning support
• digital publishing
• big data and library cyberinfrastructure
• research data management, digital curation, and stewardship
• digital humanities
• digital preservation
• information service
• information/data literacy
• digital heritage/culture

Authors must label their submissions with at least one of the following four
streams. Submissions will be evaluated using criteria set forth in the
respective stream. There is no expectation that a submission must cover all
four streams.

1. “I have a dream”. Submissions to this stream should focus on the vision,
speculation, or prophetic prediction of trends on a) the future environment
and/or ecosystem for libraries, museums, archives and related industry and b)
how do we adapt and flourish. Proposals will be mainly evaluated on vision,
novelty, and potential impact. We particularly encourage high-risk high-reward
ideas, as long as the risks are clearly articulated and assessed.

2. “Told you so”. Submissions to this stream provide theoretical,
experimental, computational, synthetic, or empirical proof or myth rebuttal
related to popular and current digital library trends and practices. Proposals
are expected to be well-referenced and balanced, and also offer nuance and
clearly laid-out limitations. The evaluation will be focused on the merits of
the arguments, as well as their potential impacts on the practices.

3. “We can do it”. Submission to this steam showcase exemplary projects,
products, or services that have already been launched. Proposals may be
further broken down into substreams such as a) “We did it first”, where
novelty and differentiation factors are highlighted; b) “We do it best”, which
focuses on the overall value gained by the patrons, communities, and the
society; or c) “We can do better”, which highlights critical improvements.
Proposals in this stream will be evaluated on the verifiable benefits these
projects bring.

4. “Together we’ll go far”. Submissions to this stream emphasize broad
collaborations, e.g., those beyond boundaries of departments, libraries,
institutions, academic disciplines, communities, regions, or even countries.
Authors should clearly articulate what, how, and why the collaboration works
and what values the collaboration brings to each partner.

Proposals should consist of a title, extended abstract, and contact
information for the authors, and should not exceed 2 pages. As indicated in
the JCDL 2020 Call for Submissions, Practitioners Track submissions should use
the ACM Proceedings template
(http://www.acm.org/publications/proceedings-template) and are to be submitted
in electronic format via the conference’s EasyChair submission page
(https://easychair.org/my/conference?conf=jcdl2020).

Accepted proposals to the Practitioners Track will be included in the
conference proceedings and will be presented at the conference in visual
formats including but are not limited to posters, videos, or system and
production demonstrations. At least one author of each accepted proposal is
expected to give a one-minute presentation.

All questions concerning the practitioners track proposals should be discussed
with the track co-chairs prior to the submission deadline of April 6, 2020.
Notification of acceptance is April 27, 2020 . This year’s practitioners track
co-chairs are:

Zhiwu Xie, Virginia Tech Libraries, USA zhiwuxie@vt.edu
Long Xiao, Peking University Library, China, China lxiao@lib.pku.edu.cn
Wei Liu, Shanghai Library, China kevenlw@gmail.com

Free Webinar: Authors Among Us: A Conversation with Christina Zamon, Rachael Woody, and Margot Note

The Independent Archivist’s Section is hosting an informal webinar: “Authors Among Us: A Conversation with Christina Zamon, Rachael Woody, and Margot Note.”  Please join us for a conversation between three of our colleagues about how they drew on their experience as archivists to become authors! More info to come…do join us if you can!

Please sign-up so that we can get a sense of possible attendance.

Authors Among Us: A Conversation with Christina Zamon, Rachael Woody, and Margot Note

March 26th, 1 PM CST

To join:

https://zoom.us/j/759287400

You can join this meeting from your computer, tablet, or smartphone.

You can also dial in using your phone.

US: +1 929 436 2866, +1 669 900 6833

Meeting ID: 759-287-400

 

New Issue: Archival Science

Volume 20, Issue 1, March 2020

Original Paper
“Problems with records and recordkeeping practices are not confined to the past”: a challenge from the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse
Frank Golding

Original Paper
Decolonizing recordkeeping and archival praxis in childhood out-of-home Care and indigenous archival collections
Sue McKemmish, Jane Bone, Joanne Evans, Frank Golding, Antonina Lewis

Original Paper
The flexibility of the records continuum model: a response to Michael Karabinos’ “in the shadow of the continuum”
Viviane Frings-Hessami

Original Paper
Epistemologies of the archive: toward a critique of archival reason
Jason Lustig

Original Paper
The implications of digital collection takedown requests on archival appraisal
Shelly Black

Correction
Correction to: “To go beyond”: towards a decolonial archival praxis
J. J. Ghaddar, Michelle Caswell

Recent Issue: Archivaria

Latest Issue – Archivaria 88 (Fall 2019)
subscription/membership

Articles
Reciprocal Archival Imaginaries: The Shifting Boundaries of “Community” in Community Archives
GRACEN BRILMYER, JOYCE GABIOLA, JIMMY ZAVALA & MICHELLE CASWELL

The Trust in Archives–Trust in Digital Archival Content Framework
DEVAN RAY DONALDSON

“Treat Them with the Reverence of Archivists”: Records Work, Grief Work, and Relationship Work in the Archives
JENNIFER DOUGLAS, ALEXANDRA ALISAUSKAS, AND DEVON MORDELL

Investigating the Impact of the Living Archives on Eugenics in Western Canada
WENDY DUFF, JEFFERSON SPORN, AND EMILY HERRON

In Critical Condition: (Un)Becoming Bodies in Archival Acts of Truth Telling
JAMIE A. LEE

Counterpoint
For the Purpose of Accountability: The Need for a Comprehensive Recordkeeping Act
D. RICHARD VALPY

Book Reviews
Matthew Harle, Afterlives of Abandoned Work: Creative Debris in the Archive
AMY MARSHALL FURNESS

Jordan Landes and Richard Espley, eds., Radical Collections: Re-Examining the Roots of Collections, Practices and Information Professions
JENNIFER GRANT

Trevor Owens, The Theory and Craft of Digital Preservation
EVELYN MCLELLAN

Obituary
Elizabeth Blight, 1944-2019

Letter to the Editor
Ray Edmondson

CFP: JELIS Issue on Creative Approaches to Teaching and Pedagogy (Journal of Education for Library and Information Science)

Opportunity for archival educators:

__________________________________________________

JELIS Special Issue: Volume 62, 2021

JELIS would like to announce the opening for submissions to a Special Issue of the journal (Volume 62, Issue 3, 2021). The Issue theme is as follows:

Creative approaches to teaching and pedagogy

Topics including, but not limited to:

  • Construction of positive learning outcomes
  • Engagement of students in course content
  • Innovative assessment techniques
  • Employment of learning theories
  • Utilization of learning management systems
  • Peer learning strategies
  • Creative syllabus development
  • Advances in assignments for students
  • Employment of tactics from other disciplines
  • Sage and guide
  • Communicative action and teaching
  • Students as teachers
  • The field of creativity studies and its contribution to LIS education and pedagogy

Submissions (see the JELIS guidelines at https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458) may be made in the “Special Issue Papers” section of ScholarOne. Submit only completed papers. The submission is open until September 30, 2020. The submitted papers will be assessed according to the following criteria:

  • Importance of the research question
  • Inclusiveness of the literature review
  • Appropriateness of the methodology
  • Reporting of the findings
  • Quality of the presentation

CFP: Research Methods & Social Justice in LIS: Special issue of IJIDI (International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion)

This call is geared towards librarians, but there is potential for archivists’ voices.

____________________________________

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

A Special Issue of The International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI)

INTERSECTING THEORIES AND METHODS
TO RESEARCH SOCIAL JUSTICE IN LIS SCHOLARSHIP

We invite contributions for a special issue of TheInternational Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI) (http://publish.lib.umd.edu/IJIDI) on the topic of “Intersecting Theories and Methods to Research Social Justice in LIS Scholarship.” We welcome full research papers that make a novel contribution to library and information science (LIS) scholarship, whether empirical, methodological, theory-based, pedagogical, and/or practical in nature. We also ask for Expressions of Interest contributions for a special section on notes-from-the-field, LIS student work, works-in-progress, opinion pieces, and professional reports.

The goal of this special issue is to bring together voices of both emerging scholars and established researchers from a wide range of interdisciplinary perspectives and paradigmatic roots that embrace social justice as an intentional and deliberate strategy in LIS scholarship to generate impact via their information-related work. The term “scholarship” is intentionally used to include documentation and analysis through intersecting lens of diverse theories and methods to implement social justice in LIS practice and research, education and teaching, policy development, service design, and program implementation, among other areas. This collection will showcase exemplars of LIS scholarship from across local, regional, national, and international contexts.

Thus, this special issue will provide examples of study that adopt rigorous models, frameworks, theories, methods, and approaches in LIS research to further social justice and inclusion advocacy in the field. In the process, this collection will fill gaps in showcasing intersections of LIS and interdisciplinary theories with traditional and non-traditional methods of research to further social justice principles of fairness, justice, and equality/equity for all people, including those on the margins of society.

Topics and subjects that expound the intersection of LIS theories and methods may include:

  • Implementing social justice within various domains (e.g., agriculture/rural, diversity, economy, education, health, information technology, law, manufacturing and industry, public policy, social welfare, etc.);
  • Addressing social justice issues related to the information creation-organization-management-dissemination-use processes, critical research design of socio-technical systems, or human information behavior of underserved or disenfranchised populations;
  • Examining problematic dimensions associated with information poverty, marginalization, information literacy of diverse patrons, privileged access and use, biased communication behaviors, information “expert” versus information user, and oppressive technologies;
  • Exploring ways in which LIS programs worldwide are seeking to develop and implement systematic approaches to integrate social justice, social equity, inclusion advocacy, critical information literacies and engaged scholarship while partnering with minority and underserved populations to make meaningful changes in LIS curriculum and discourse.

We invite fully developed research papers for the Articles section (original empirical research, conceptual and theoretical papers), as well as shorter submissions for the Special section (notes-from-the-field, LIS student work, works-in-progress, opinion pieces, and professional reports).

Submission Process – Important Dates

This special issue of IJIDI is scheduled for publication in January 2021. The following submission timeline applies:

31 March, 2020: Abstracts and Expressions of interest (name, role and affiliation: extended abstracts of up to 1,000 words for full research papers, and 250-500 words for contributions to the special section). Please email your submissions to: bmehra@ua.edu.

30 April, 2020: Notification of acceptance

1 July, 2020: Full papers due

January 2021: Special issue published
This issue will be guest edited by: Bharat Mehra, Endowed Chair in Social Justice and Professor, University of Alabama, USA (bmehra@ua.edu)

Author Guidelines and Peer Review Process
Please consult IJIDI Author Guidelines and IJIDI Peer Review Process at: https://jps.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/ijidi/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Any questions related to this issue should be addressed to: bmehra@ua.edu