Call for Contributions: Special Section of American Archivist

Hello and good day, everyone,

I am writing to you this morning as both a member of the SAA Design Records Section and as an Editorial Board member of the American Archivist. I would like to invite you all to consider writing an article for an upcoming special design records-related section of the journal.

The section will focus on such topics as design records management, repositories, practices, content, challenges, etc. We will also feature an image from a contributing repository for the issue’s cover.

Submitting a written work to AA is a wonderful way to reach out to your peers, contribute to the professional literature, and highlight your innovative practice and special content.

The AA Editor and Editorial Board have designated volume 84, issue 1 (fall/winter 2021) for this dedicated content; the publication/production calendar is:

July 1, 2020: Submissions due
December 2020: Peer review feedback returned and final decisions made
June 2021: Final drafts due

Many submission questions can be answered at www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/submissions. I am also certainly happy to field any questions and you are welcome to write to me off-line (please see my contact information below).

Thank you for considering this invitation; we look forward to your submissions!

Yours,
Karen

——————————
Karen Jamison TRIVETTE, MLS
Assoc. Prof., Head of Special Collections and College Archives
Gladys Marcus Library | Goodman Resource Center | Room E432
Fashion Institute of Technology – SUNY
Seventh Avenue at 27 Street
New York City 10001-5992
www.fitnyc.edu/library
karen_trivette@fitnyc.edu
212 217.4386 office | 212 217.4371 Library fax | 518.526.6307 cell

Update, plus Archivaria and The Public Historian are open access

Greetings to all-

As I’m sure it has been for many of you, the past couple of weeks have consisted of planning work-from-home projects. I hope to get back to regular posts soon.

In the meantime, Archivaria and The Public Historian have temporarily opened all their content for free access. If you hear of more, send me a message and I’ll share!

Thanks,
Cheryl

Archivaria

Temporary removal of embargo

In response to the public health crisis of COVID-19, we’re pleased to announce that we’ll be making the eight most recent issues of Archivaria freely available to all through this site and on Project Muse. Content from the last four years will now be available free for all until June 30th 2020. As always, all other previous issues are available in the Back Issues section of this site for your reading pleasure during these challenging times!

Posted: 2020-03-23

The Public Historian

Looking for free, unlocked access to The Public Historian
(University of California Press) at this time? As part of the Press’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Press has made arrangements for all of its journal content (including that of The Public Historian) to be made freely available through the end of June. This is to assist the community of libraries, faculty, students, and scholars with access during a time when their usual access is likely disrupted or challenged due to library closures, remote working arrangements, etc. Let us know how this access changes the way you use The Public Historian during this time! https://tph.ucpress.edu

 

New Issue: Archival Science

Volume 20, Issue 1, March 2020

Original Paper
“Problems with records and recordkeeping practices are not confined to the past”: a challenge from the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse
Frank Golding

Original Paper
Decolonizing recordkeeping and archival praxis in childhood out-of-home Care and indigenous archival collections
Sue McKemmish, Jane Bone, Joanne Evans, Frank Golding, Antonina Lewis

Original Paper
The flexibility of the records continuum model: a response to Michael Karabinos’ “in the shadow of the continuum”
Viviane Frings-Hessami

Original Paper
Epistemologies of the archive: toward a critique of archival reason
Jason Lustig

Original Paper
The implications of digital collection takedown requests on archival appraisal
Shelly Black

Correction
Correction to: “To go beyond”: towards a decolonial archival praxis
J. J. Ghaddar, Michelle Caswell

Recent Issue: Archivaria

Latest Issue – Archivaria 88 (Fall 2019)
subscription/membership

Articles
Reciprocal Archival Imaginaries: The Shifting Boundaries of “Community” in Community Archives
GRACEN BRILMYER, JOYCE GABIOLA, JIMMY ZAVALA & MICHELLE CASWELL

The Trust in Archives–Trust in Digital Archival Content Framework
DEVAN RAY DONALDSON

“Treat Them with the Reverence of Archivists”: Records Work, Grief Work, and Relationship Work in the Archives
JENNIFER DOUGLAS, ALEXANDRA ALISAUSKAS, AND DEVON MORDELL

Investigating the Impact of the Living Archives on Eugenics in Western Canada
WENDY DUFF, JEFFERSON SPORN, AND EMILY HERRON

In Critical Condition: (Un)Becoming Bodies in Archival Acts of Truth Telling
JAMIE A. LEE

Counterpoint
For the Purpose of Accountability: The Need for a Comprehensive Recordkeeping Act
D. RICHARD VALPY

Book Reviews
Matthew Harle, Afterlives of Abandoned Work: Creative Debris in the Archive
AMY MARSHALL FURNESS

Jordan Landes and Richard Espley, eds., Radical Collections: Re-Examining the Roots of Collections, Practices and Information Professions
JENNIFER GRANT

Trevor Owens, The Theory and Craft of Digital Preservation
EVELYN MCLELLAN

Obituary
Elizabeth Blight, 1944-2019

Letter to the Editor
Ray Edmondson

CFP: JELIS Issue on Creative Approaches to Teaching and Pedagogy (Journal of Education for Library and Information Science)

Opportunity for archival educators:

__________________________________________________

JELIS Special Issue: Volume 62, 2021

JELIS would like to announce the opening for submissions to a Special Issue of the journal (Volume 62, Issue 3, 2021). The Issue theme is as follows:

Creative approaches to teaching and pedagogy

Topics including, but not limited to:

  • Construction of positive learning outcomes
  • Engagement of students in course content
  • Innovative assessment techniques
  • Employment of learning theories
  • Utilization of learning management systems
  • Peer learning strategies
  • Creative syllabus development
  • Advances in assignments for students
  • Employment of tactics from other disciplines
  • Sage and guide
  • Communicative action and teaching
  • Students as teachers
  • The field of creativity studies and its contribution to LIS education and pedagogy

Submissions (see the JELIS guidelines at https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458) may be made in the “Special Issue Papers” section of ScholarOne. Submit only completed papers. The submission is open until September 30, 2020. The submitted papers will be assessed according to the following criteria:

  • Importance of the research question
  • Inclusiveness of the literature review
  • Appropriateness of the methodology
  • Reporting of the findings
  • Quality of the presentation

CFP: Research Methods & Social Justice in LIS: Special issue of IJIDI (International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion)

This call is geared towards librarians, but there is potential for archivists’ voices.

____________________________________

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

A Special Issue of The International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI)

INTERSECTING THEORIES AND METHODS
TO RESEARCH SOCIAL JUSTICE IN LIS SCHOLARSHIP

We invite contributions for a special issue of TheInternational Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI) (http://publish.lib.umd.edu/IJIDI) on the topic of “Intersecting Theories and Methods to Research Social Justice in LIS Scholarship.” We welcome full research papers that make a novel contribution to library and information science (LIS) scholarship, whether empirical, methodological, theory-based, pedagogical, and/or practical in nature. We also ask for Expressions of Interest contributions for a special section on notes-from-the-field, LIS student work, works-in-progress, opinion pieces, and professional reports.

The goal of this special issue is to bring together voices of both emerging scholars and established researchers from a wide range of interdisciplinary perspectives and paradigmatic roots that embrace social justice as an intentional and deliberate strategy in LIS scholarship to generate impact via their information-related work. The term “scholarship” is intentionally used to include documentation and analysis through intersecting lens of diverse theories and methods to implement social justice in LIS practice and research, education and teaching, policy development, service design, and program implementation, among other areas. This collection will showcase exemplars of LIS scholarship from across local, regional, national, and international contexts.

Thus, this special issue will provide examples of study that adopt rigorous models, frameworks, theories, methods, and approaches in LIS research to further social justice and inclusion advocacy in the field. In the process, this collection will fill gaps in showcasing intersections of LIS and interdisciplinary theories with traditional and non-traditional methods of research to further social justice principles of fairness, justice, and equality/equity for all people, including those on the margins of society.

Topics and subjects that expound the intersection of LIS theories and methods may include:

  • Implementing social justice within various domains (e.g., agriculture/rural, diversity, economy, education, health, information technology, law, manufacturing and industry, public policy, social welfare, etc.);
  • Addressing social justice issues related to the information creation-organization-management-dissemination-use processes, critical research design of socio-technical systems, or human information behavior of underserved or disenfranchised populations;
  • Examining problematic dimensions associated with information poverty, marginalization, information literacy of diverse patrons, privileged access and use, biased communication behaviors, information “expert” versus information user, and oppressive technologies;
  • Exploring ways in which LIS programs worldwide are seeking to develop and implement systematic approaches to integrate social justice, social equity, inclusion advocacy, critical information literacies and engaged scholarship while partnering with minority and underserved populations to make meaningful changes in LIS curriculum and discourse.

We invite fully developed research papers for the Articles section (original empirical research, conceptual and theoretical papers), as well as shorter submissions for the Special section (notes-from-the-field, LIS student work, works-in-progress, opinion pieces, and professional reports).

Submission Process – Important Dates

This special issue of IJIDI is scheduled for publication in January 2021. The following submission timeline applies:

31 March, 2020: Abstracts and Expressions of interest (name, role and affiliation: extended abstracts of up to 1,000 words for full research papers, and 250-500 words for contributions to the special section). Please email your submissions to: bmehra@ua.edu.

30 April, 2020: Notification of acceptance

1 July, 2020: Full papers due

January 2021: Special issue published
This issue will be guest edited by: Bharat Mehra, Endowed Chair in Social Justice and Professor, University of Alabama, USA (bmehra@ua.edu)

Author Guidelines and Peer Review Process
Please consult IJIDI Author Guidelines and IJIDI Peer Review Process at: https://jps.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/ijidi/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Any questions related to this issue should be addressed to: bmehra@ua.edu

New Journal: Reviews in Digital Humanities

Welcome to Reviews in Digital Humanities

Reviews in Digital Humanities, edited by Dr. Jennifer Guiliano and Dr. Roopika Risam, is the pilot of a peer-reviewed journal and project registry that facilitates scholarly evaluation and dissemination of digital humanities work and its outputs. We accept submissions of projects that blend humanistic and technical inquiry in a broad range of methods, disciplines, scopes, and scales. These include but are not limited to: digital archives, multimedia or multimodal scholarship, digital exhibits, visualizations, digital games, and digital tools. We particularly encourage submission of digital scholarship in critical ethnic, African diaspora, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian American, and postcolonial studies. Submit your work or contact the editors at reviewsindigitalhumanities@gmail.com.