CFP: Exploring Literacies Through Digital Humanities (dh+lib special issue) @DHandLib

CFP: Exploring Literacies Through Digital Humanities

This past year an informal group of librarians began meeting to discuss the intricate relationships between digital humanities (DH) and literacies—information literacy, visual literacy, digital literacy, data literacy, and the like—with the intention of fostering a larger conversation around the topic and learn more about what’s actually happening “on the ground.” The group was motivated by the desire to help librarians striving to incorporate digital pedagogy into their teaching and those seeking to engage more critically with digital forms of scholarship. To contribute to this conversation, this dh+lib special issue is seeking submissions that explore DH work, be it research, digital project creation and evaluation, or digital pedagogy, through the lens of literacies.

Call: https://acrl.ala.org/dh/2019/09/04/cfp-exploring-literacies-through-digital-humanities/

The aim of this special issue is to provide readers from all areas of librarianship with greater insight into the intersection of DH and literacies, therefore, please keep the audience in mind and make choices such as defining DH-specific terms or linking out to resources that provide further explanation of DH methods and concepts.

New voices and submissions from graduate students, junior scholars, instructional technologists, and others who work on the frontlines of DH and literacy work are encouraged. Perspectives from outside of the U.S. are particularly welcome. Submissions may take the form of short essays (between 750 and 1500 words long) or responses in other media that are of comparable length. Possible topics include:

  • How can digital humanities tools/methods inform teaching information literacy concepts? Or vice versa?
  • How do aspects of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy, such as the constructed and contextual nature of authority, fit in with digital humanities work? How do digital humanities methods and scholarship create challenges for the ACRL Framework?
  • How might the ACRL Framework (or other frameworks and literacies) serve as a basis for evaluating digital humanities scholarship?
  • What are the threshold concepts for digital humanities?
  • How might our professional literacies inform our collection practices, especially around collections as data?
  • How might DH literacies inform other areas of professional practice?
  • Conduct an analysis of a digital humanities project that explores the literacies and competencies necessary for its creation.
  • Discuss criticisms of literacies as a concept or issues with applying a literacy framework to DH work.

Please send your proposals in the form of a 250-word abstract and a brief biographical statement for each author to the editors at dhandlib.acrl@gmail.com using the subject line: 2019 Special Issue. Proposals are due by October 30, 2019.

Copyright notice: Material published on dh+lib will be covered by the CC BY-4.0 International license unless otherwise arranged with the Editors-in-Chief.

New Issue: International Journal of Digital Curation

Volume 14 no. 1 (2019)
(open access)

Papers (Peer-reviewed)

Digital Curation Education at the Universities of Ibadan and Liverpool
Abiola Abioye, James Lowry, Rosemary Lynch

Progress in Research Data Services
Andrew M Cox, Dr, Mary Anne Kennan, Dr, Elizabeth Josephine Lyon, Dr, Stephen Pinfield, Dr, Laura Sbaffi, Dr

Putting the Trust into Trusted Data Repositories: A Federated Solution for the Australian National Imaging Facility
Andrew James Mehnert, Andrew Janke, Marco Gruwel, Wojtek James Goscinski, Thomas Close, Dean Taylor, Aswin Narayanan, George Vidalis, Graham Galloway, Andrew Treloar

Updating the Data Curation Continuum
Andrew Treloar, Jens Klump

Identifying Topical Coverages of Curricula using Topic Modeling and Visualization Techniques: A Case of Digital and Data Curation
Seungwon Yang, Boryung Ju, Haeyong Chung

Articles

Developing a data management consultation service for faculty researchers: A case study from a large Midwestern public university
Virginia A Dressler, Kristin Yeager, Elizabeth Richardson

Experimental Data Curation at Large Instrument Facilities with Open Source Software
Line Pouchard, Kerstin Kleese van Dam, Stuart I Campbell

CFP: Catholic Library World (ongoing)

This call does not specifically mention archives, but is a good opportunity for anyone who works with Catholic collections.

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Submissions are being accepted on an ongoing basis for upcoming issues of Catholic Library World.

Catholic Library World is the official journal of the Catholic Library Association. Established in 1929, CLW is a peer-reviewed association journal. CLW publishes articles focusing on all aspects of librarianship, especially as it relates to Catholic Studies and Catholicism. CLW articles are intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various types of libraries, including, but not limited to academic, public, theological, parish and church libraries, and school libraries.

The preferred method for submitting manuscripts is as a word-processed attachment in e-mail. Author’s full name, affiliation, and e-mail address must accompany any manuscript submission.

Articles should provide something new to the existing literature. The word count should be 3500-5000 words and should adhere to The Chicago Manual of Style (humanities is preferred). The style should be accessible and well-documented.

For more information, please visit this website: https://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications

Send submissions and queries to: Sigrid Kelsey, General Editor, sigridkelsey@gmail.com

Call for Papers: Judaica Librarianship (2020)

Call for Papers, Volume 22

This year marks the 200th anniversary of the Wissenschaft des Judentums movement, or the birth of Jewish Studies as an academic discipline. For the 22nd issue of Judaica Librarianship, the editorial board invites you to submit papers on the contribution of libraries and archives, as well as individual librarians and archivists or librarian–scholar collaborations, to the scholarly field of Jewish Studies. Papers could focus on collection building, in particular collections that contributed to the formation and development of Jewish Studies; description of, and discovery systems for library and archival objects, including library catalogs, library guides, archival finding aids, or metadata creation for digitized collections; bibliographies or other reference tools; reference, research, and instruction services, including online tutorials; and library outreach efforts, including interaction with scholars and students on social media. Other papers that meet the journal’s scope are welcome as well. For JL’s submission guidelines and policies, see the journal homepage at https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/; or contact the editor for any questions. The deadline is January 31, 2020.

Rachel Leket-Mor

Associate Librarian, MA, MLIS

Curator, Open Stack Collections

IsraPulp Collection

Arizona State University Library

Phone: 480-965-2618

 

Editor, Judaica Librarianship

Association of Jewish Libraries

https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

CFP: Archives & Manuscripts

Archives & Manuscripts – Call for Papers

19 Sep 2019

Archives & Manuscripts is inviting submissions of up to 10,000 words for a themed edition on Scholarly and Professional Communication in Archives: Archival Traditions and Languages in March 2021.

In this special issue of Archives & Manuscripts, we are seeking to develop our knowledge base by bringing together authors that represent different archival traditions and practices. We are particularly interested in contributions by authors – scholars and practitioners – from non-English speaking countries that present and contrast different archival traditions and/or practices.

Key Dates

Expressions of interest: 15 December 2019 by email.
Submission deadline: 1 July 2020
Publication: March 2021

Submission Instructions

For full details and submission instructions, download the full Call for papers – Special Issue Archival Traditions and Languages.

New Issue: COMMA

Volume 2017, Issue 2, 2019
(subscription)

Introduction
Amy Tector

Articles

Auto-classification in an international organization: report from a feasibility study
Gesa Büttner

Les barrières à l’accès aux documents administratifs au Ministère de l’économie, de la planification et de l’aménagement du Territoire du Cameroun
Jacques Albert Monty

The disconnect between archival descriptive technique and records management taxonomies
G. Mark Walsh

Archivists as amanuenses (scribes) of Indigenous knowledge
Nicola Laurent

Las nuevas realidades de la reprografía en archivos: de los metadatos a la gestión de procesos
Francisco Javier Crespo Muñoz

L’archivistique au Maroc : naissance, évolution et situation actuelle
Siham Alaoui

Quelles archives pour la société de demain? Le débat autour de la collecte des archives en France depuis les années 2000
Marie Ranquet

The physical barriers to accessing the documentary heritage at the National Archives of Zimbabwe
Forget Chaterera Antonio Rodrigues

El arte de robar Arte: Por una cartografía de los robos en Brasil y sus conexiones
Beatriz Kushnir

Archivos digitales, gobierno abierto y transparencia
Alicia Barnard

The uses of Wikidata for galleries, libraries, archives and museums and its place in the digital humanities
Stacey Cook

Requirements for archives and records management jobs in international organizations with focus on United Nations – A job analysis of the vacancy announcements in 2016
Maik Schmerbauch

International trends in standardizing archival terminology : the Multilingual Archival Terminology (MAT) as a model
Amany Mohamed

Library Technology: Innovating Technologies, Services, and Practices

This call is not archives-specific, but definitely our technological advancements can contribute to the conversation.

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Technology is ubiquitous and ever evolving in academic libraries ranging from the technology integrated in the physical library space to online presences that connect users to library resources. Keeping up with the constant development to library technology services and practices can be a challenge for any library—there could be financial, space, or staffing constraints in addition to other potential detractors. However, there are also ample opportunities to excel in specific areas of library technology in order to better serve our library users in their research and knowledge creation journey. Academic libraries can share their innovative implementation and management of technologies or technology related services and practices. These conversations drive the future of library technology and technology practices. It all starts with a spark of inspiration.

A CALL FOR PROPOSALS

College & Undergraduate Libraries, a peer-reviewed journal published by Taylor & Francis, invites proposals for a special issue focusing on innovative technologies, technology services and practices in academic libraries. Library technology is broadly defined to be inclusive of the various types of technologies academic libraries support. Potential submissions include research studies, case studies, best practices, or position papers involving:

  • Immersive research or programs such as augmented reality or virtual reality
  • Makerspaces or creation studios
  • Enhancing library space with technology
  • Sustainability and library technology
  • Assessing library technology services using UX practices
  • Evaluating library technology department workflows or functionality
  • Securing library technology
  • Privacy and ethics with library technology or library technology services
  • Internet of Things in an academic library
  • Designing academic library websites or technology services
  • Using analytics to improve a library service or online presence
  • Improving access to library resources via discovery services or library management systems
  • Exploring alternative means of authentication or improving current authentication systems
  • Incorporating machine learning or library data projects
  • Adding technology into library instruction or using innovative technology to teach remote learners
  • Teaching technology in an academic library
  • Intentionally designing learning spaces with technology
  • Using Git or other code repositories for library technology management
  • Strategic planning of technology services
  • Accessibility of library technologies
  • Increasing inclusion using technology
  • Innovative or inspiring library technology projects/programs
  • Technology trends outside the library we should be watching

Submissions may address opportunities, challenges, and criticism in any of these areas. Topics not listed in these themes may also be considered.

This special issue is set to be published in June 2020.

Submitting a Proposal

Proposals should include a title, an abstract (500 words maximum), keywords describing the article (6 keywords max), and author(s) contact information.

Please submit article proposals via email to Tabatha Farney (guest editor) at tfarney@uccs.edu by September 30th, 2019. Final manuscripts are due by February 15, 2020.

Feel free to contact me with any questions that you may have,

Tabatha Farney, guest editor

Director of Web Services and Emerging Technologies

Kraemer Family Library

University of Colorado Colorado Springs

tfarney@uccs.edu