Recent Issue: Information & Culture

New Issue: Volume 53, Number 1 (January/February 2018)

“Crises” in Scholarly Communications? Insights from the Emergence of the Journal of Library History, 1947–1966

Maria Gonzalez and Patricia Galloway
p. 3-42

This study examines the first ten years of the journal now known as Information & Culture. Founded in 1966 as The Journal of Library History, the Journal has been shaped according to the values, habits, and competencies that its contributors brought to changing circumstances so as to transform the Journal into an erudite interdisciplinary publication distant from its beginnings as a compendium of entertaining vignettes and didactic notes on the writing and uses of library history. Historical perspectives are used to frame various crises in scholarly communications that are treated chronologically as they confronted the Journal, drawing on archival sources, secondary sources, interviews, participant observation by Gonzalez, and close reading of the publication to construct a narrative about the Journal in its relation to higher education, scholarly publication, and professional and disciplinary developments in librarianship and companion fields under the increasing influence of technology on these fields. The characters, actions, and settings are interpreted through the sociological lens of Pierre Bourdieu’s concepts of social field, habitus, and multiple forms of actual and metaphorical capital request government.

Maria Elena Gonzalez, after a career in architecture and building, earned a PhD in Library and Information Science (2008) from the School of Information, University of Texas-Austin, and has taught in that field at Wayne State University and Rutgers University.

Patricia Galloway spent twenty years at the Mississippi Department of Archives and history before coming to teach courses on appraisal and digital archives at the School of Information, University of Texas-Austin. She holds PhDs in Comparative Literature (1973) and Anthropology (2004) from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

Reading the Minor Forest Product bulletins of the Philippine Bureau of Forestry: a case study of the role of reference works in the American Empire of the early twentieth century

Brendan Luyt
p. 43-66

Empires are built around the control of information with an often-overlooked aspect of empire building being the construction of tools of reference. These tools incorporate with them in summary form the multiplicity of inscriptions that are a product of the empire’s epistemological operations. In order to shed some light on this face of empire, this article focuses on three readings of the minor forest products bulletins published by the Bureau of Forestry of the Philippines in the early twentieth century. The first of these sees the bulletins as demonstrating the Bureau of Forestry’s mastery of the forest domain in the face of natural and human resistance to its work. In the second reading, we can see the Bureau’s efforts to create and assist “botanical entrepreneurs” capable and willing to exploit forest products in an efficient manner. Finally, we can read the bulletins as particular manifestations of the botanical guide as a genre. In this case the bulletins created a series of “inscription clusters” that served to enhance the authority of the Bureau of Forestry as a mediator between users and the forests of the Philippines.

Brendan Luyt is Associate Professor at the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication & Information, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He received both his MLIS and PhD degrees from the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. He also holds a MA in Political Science from Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Pinkerton’s National Detective Agency and the Information Work of the Nineteenth-Century Surveillance State

Alan Bilansky
p. 67-84

Private security contractor for business and government, Allan Pinkerton acted centrally in early chapters of the history of the security state. The operative and the report, Pinkerton’s principal surveillance technologies, are analyzed here in relation to each other and in their historical development as information technology, drawing on Pinkerton’s fictionalized accounts of cases, secret reports and other Agency documents. Pinkerton management was consistently preoccupied with strict compliance of operatives, their deployment in a network, and the regular submission of reports. This study suggests information can lead to uncertainty and the surveillance state was and is compartmentalized, entrepreneurial, and other-than-public.

Alan Bilansky holds a PhD in Rhetoric and Democracy from Penn State and an MSLIS from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he consults with faculty about technology and occasionally teaches informatics. He is currently at work on a book examining the information practices of Pinkerton’s National Detective Agency.

The Literature of American Library History, 2014 – 2015

Edward Goedeken
p. 85-120

This biennial review of the writings on the history of libraries, librarianship, and information surveys about 200 publications that were published in 2014 and 2015. The essay is divided into a number of specific sections including: academic and public libraries, biography, technical services, and the history of reading and publishing. It also contains a brief list of theses and dissertations that were completed in 2014 and 2015.

Edward A. Goedeken is Professor of Library Science and Collections Coordinator at the Iowa State University Library. Over the past twenty years he has maintained an ongoing bibliography of library history scholarship, and every two years crafts a review essay for Information & Culture on the most recent writings in this discipline.

This issue of Information & Culture is now available on Project Muse.

Book Reviews (reviews are open access)

The Econimization of Life, by Michelle Murphy, reviewed by Marika Cifor 

Michelle Murphy provocatively describes the twentieth-century rise of infrastructures of calculation and experiment aimed at governing population for the sake of national economy, pinpointing the spread of a potent biopolitical logic. Resituating the history of postcolonial neoliberal technique in expert circuits between the United States and Bangladesh, Murphy traces the methods and imaginaries through which family planning calculated lives not worth living, lives not worth saving, and lives not worth being born. The resulting archive of thick data transmuted into financialized “Invest in a Girl” campaigns that reframed survival as a question of human capital. The book challenges readers to reject the economy as our collective container and to refuse population as a term of reproductive justice. (Duke University Press)

A Mind at Play: How Claude Shannon Invented the Information Age, by Jimmy Soni and Rob Goodman, reviewed by Edward Goedeken

The life and times of one of the foremost intellects of the twentieth century: Claude Shannon—the neglected architect of the Information Age, whose insights stand behind every computer built, email sent, video streamed, and webpage loaded. In this elegantly written, exhaustively researched biography, Jimmy Soni and Rob Goodman reveal Claude Shannon’s full story for the first time.

Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost its Edge in Computing, by Marie Hicks, reviewed by Megan Finn

Marie Hicks explores the story of labor feminization and gendered technocracy that undercut British efforts to computerize. That failure sprang from the government’s systematic neglect of its largest trained technical workforce simply because they were women. Women were a hidden engine of growth in high technology from World War II to the 1960s. As computing experienced a gender flip, becoming male-identified in the 1960s and 1970s, labor problems grew into structural ones and gender discrimination caused the nation’s largest computer user—the civil service and sprawling public sector—to make decisions that were disastrous for the British computer industry and the nation as a whole. (MIT Press)

Atari Age: The Emergence of Video Games in America, by Michael Z. Newman, reviewed by Roderic Crooks

Beginning with the release of the Magnavox Odyssey and Pong in 1972, video games, whether played in arcades and taverns or in family rec rooms, became part of popular culture, like television. In fact, video games were sometimes seen as an improvement on television because they spurred participation rather than passivity. These “space-age pinball machines” gave coin-operated games a high-tech and more respectable profile. In Atari Age, Michael Newman charts the emergence of video games in America from ball-and-paddle games to hits like Space Invaders and Pac-Man, describing their relationship to other amusements and technologies and showing how they came to be identified with the middle class, youth, and masculinity. (MIT Press)

CFP: Diversity and Inclusion in Music Librarianship special issue of Music Reference Services Quarterly

Though focused on music librarianship, the call includes mentions aspects also applicable to archives and special collections.


We are excited to invite submissions from practitioners, scholars, activists, and students on the theme of Diversity and Inclusion in Music Librarianship for a special issue of Music Reference Services Quarterly (MRSQ).

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

* Diversity initiatives in music librarianship
* Inclusive management practices
* Social justice in music libraries
* Collection development techniques to support diverse constituents
* Inclusive practices in resource cataloging or description
* Accessibility and digital musical content delivery
* Accessibility and music library facilities
* Diversity and/or inclusion in music librarianship education

And finally, given ALA Midwinter conversations:

* Neutrality in (music) libraries

MRSQ is a peer-reviewed journal published by Taylor & Francis.

Deadline for initial submissions is August 1, 2018. Articles tentatively accepted by editors will subsequently go through double-blind peer-review. Please email both editors if you would like to discuss article ideas or questions: and


Ana Dubnjakovic and Rachel Scott
Co-editor-in-chief | Music Reference Services Quarterly

Job Announcement: Editor of Manuscripts

Editor of Manuscripts

Manuscripts is the quarterly journal of The Manuscript Society.  Tracing its history to 1948, The Manuscript Society has grown to an international membership of approximately 750 individuals and institutions.  The journal is presently published only in a paper edition.

Duties:  The Editor has complete oversight of the publication of Manuscripts. The position solicits and edits articles for publication; coordinates peer review of submissions as appropriate; obtains copyright and author approval forms; proofreads, collates proofs, etc.; prepares the journal’s index for the Fall issue; works directly with the person responsible for design and layout; works with the printer to maintain a timely publication schedule and to develop a high-quality product; and works effectively with the coeditors for “Auction Trends” and “Reviews” sections of Manuscripts and the editor of The Manuscript Society’s News.  The Editor also serves on the Publications Committee, participates on a regular basis with the Executive Committee, reports at Board of Trustees meetings, and attends annual meetings.

Desirable Qualifications: Demonstrated ability to write well, as exhibited through publications, editorial projects, service on editorial boards, etc.  Broad knowledge about collecting manuscripts and archives, American history or other pertinent humanities background.  Familiarity with current trends in electronic text submission, editing, and publication, including handling of PDF files.  Ability to collaborate and work well with authors, assistant editors, production staff, design staff, the Executive Committee, Board of Trustees and other members of The Manuscript Society.  Ability to plan and adhere to schedules.  Ability to provide attention to detail, to inspire contributors, and to work well under pressure and with a variety of people. Familiarity with word-processing programs and electronic document transfer via the Internet. Budgeting experience desirable.  Familiarity with The Manuscript Society, its goals and the role Manuscripts has in realizing them.

Salary is $2,750.00 per issue.  Expenses to attend board and annual meetings are covered by the Society. The initial appointment is for two years with the possibility for re-appointment. There will be a six-month probation period.

We are looking for someone who is innovative, creative and a team player.

Interested candidates are asked to submit their application (CV, cover letter, and examples of their work) to the Mr. Allen Ottens, Chairman, Editor Search Committee, 1802 Old Oaks Court, Rockford, IL 61108; email:


CFP: Journal of Western Archives

The Journal of Western Archives is currently accepting proposals for a special issue on diversity, inclusion, and cultural competency (see call below). Please note that the deadline for submitting proposals for the special issue is April 1st. We hope you will consider writing about your experiences and sharing them in this special issue. Submit your proposals Gordon Daines ( and Helen Wong Smith ( We will also entertain any questions you might have.

Diversity means different things to different people. It can be thought of as a fact or noun-something that you are or have. It can potentially encompass differences along lines of race, gender, socio-economic status, age, physical abilities, religious beliefs, political beliefs, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. Inclusion refers to the activities that individuals and institutions engage in that allow all kinds of individuals to feel comfortable and accepted with equal opportunity to access services. Inclusion can be thought of as an activity or verb-it is something that you do. Archivists have been interested in the concept of diversity for at least forty years-mainly in terms of collections and the profession as a whole. We have attempted to document diversity in our communities and to achieve diversity in the profession. Progress has been extremely slow. Dennis Meissner recently challenged archivists to move away from a diversity mindset and to an inclusive mindset. To meet this challenge, the Journal of Western Archives is currently seeking submissions for an upcoming special issue focused on the shift from diversity to inclusion.

Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • The history of diversity in the archives profession
  • The implications of shifting from a diversity mindset to an inclusive mindset
  • Developing cultural competency
  • Calls to action or imagined futures for making the archival community more inclusive
  • Documenting diversity in institutions
  • Achieving diversity in the archival profession profession
  • Creating inclusive professional associations
  • Fostering inclusive collection development practices
  • Collaboration between institutional and community archives

Acceptable formats for submission include research articles or case studies. Potential contributors are also encouraged to consult the more general submission guidelines of the journal.

Submissions will be due April 1, 2018

Please contact the editors of this special issue: Helen Wong Smith ( or J. Gordon Daines III ( if you have any questions.

Call for Submissions: Special Issue of Archives and Manuscripts

Call for Submissions — Special Issue of Archives and Manuscripts

Attention all emerging scholars and new professionals in records and archives management — the following Call for Proposals is open for submissions from around the world.

Archives and Manuscripts invites submissions for a theme issue dedicated to research and writing from emerging scholars and new professionals, on the broad theme of archives, records, and information management. Recent graduates, post-graduate and honours students in records and archives management programmes within Australia or around the world are invited to submit papers based on course assignments, projects, theses or other kinds of research work carried out as part of their education. Submissions will also be considered from recent graduates, based on work just completed as part of their academic programme. Recent graduates are defined as those who have graduated from undergraduate, graduate, or post-graduate archives, records, or information studies programmes within the last two years.

The guest editors welcome a broad spectrum of submissions on any topics related to records and archives management, including, but not limited to, topics such as:
— records, archives, and information concepts, theories and principles
— the history of records, recordkeeping or archives management
— professional activities, roles, skills, responsibilities and needs
— records and archives systems, technologies or infrastructures
— the impact of digital technologies on records and archives management digital preservation
— new ways of teaching and learning about records and archives management
— the impact of changes in theory on records and archives practice
— access, reference and use of archives and records
— users of archives, community(ies) of users and public needs and priorities
— organizational cultures and social structures and their impact on records and recordkeeping
— personal records and recordkeeping activities
— the future of the profession.

How to submit your abstract

Submission Deadlines
Abstracts must be submitted no later than: 4 May 2018.
Abstracts accepted and authors notified no later than: 1 June 2018.
Full paper submissions: 24 August 2018.
Confirmation of inclusion in the special issue: 1 December 2018.
The issue is scheduled to be published in March 2019.

Submission Process

Submissions should include the following:
— The author’s full name, physical address, and email address.
— A statement confirming the author’s status as a student or recent graduate, including the name of the educational institution and/or programme of study and date of graduation, if applicable.
— A title for the proposed paper (a tentative title is acceptable)
— An abstract of no more than 500 words, outlining the theme, research question, hypothesis or focus of the paper, the research approach to be taken to the study (for theoretical or conceptual papers) or the research strategy and methodology to be used (for a research paper or case study), and any other details that help explain the intended purpose and scope of the paper.
— Between 3 and 6 keywords to represent the themes or topics in the paper.

Please submit your completed abstract by 4 May 2018 via the Archives and Manuscripts online submission site, ScholarOne Manuscripts.

If you are having difficulties with using the portal, please contact the General Editor, Katrina Dean or the Assistant Editor, Hannah Hibbert.
For accepted abstracts, the finished papers should be from 6,000-10,000 words, including notes and appendices, prepared according to Archives and Manuscripts editorial guidelines, which are available on the Instructions for Authors page. All submissions will follow a full peer review process.

For links to online submissions and for more information, go to

On behalf of the editorial team, Laura Millar is happy to receive informal enquiries and questions in advance of the deadline. Please contact her at if you have any questions or ideas about your potential contribution to this special issue of Archives and Manuscripts.

Editorial information

Guest Editor: Lise Summers, Independent Scholar, Perth, Australia Guest Editor: Laura Millar, Independent Scholar, British Columbia, Canada ( Guest Editor: Donald Force, School of Information Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, United States

Call for Book Reviewers: Oral History Review

By Nancy MacKay, Book Review Editor

Did you know that the Oral History Review, the journal of the Oral History Association, publishes 30-40 book reviews in every issue?

And that each book reviewed first must be identified as relevant to oral history; then read, analyzed and written about by volunteer scholars in the OHA community?

And that once the review is submitted to the journal, it undergoes a rigorous review and editing process before emerging in print in the form you see when you sit down with your copy of Oral History Review?

I did not know the extent or the scholarly rigor of this process until I assumed the role as book review editor in January.  As a reviewer I had taken all these steps for granted. Now I understand the effort that goes into scanning new publications for potential review books and matching a book to a volunteer reviewer. And each of those reviewers does serious work in reading and analyzing each book for fellow OHA members.

I now know that the quality of the book review section is maintained through wide community participation. I’m calling out to potential reviewers, seasoned reviewers and authors to get involved by suggesting book titles for review and participating as a reviewer. Reviewers can select books of interest to review and their desired level of activity through a form. Anyone can recommend a title for review. To get started, please contact me at

Call for Papers – Journal Open Access No. 9 (Jan-June 2018) – Dossier “threatened Heritage”

Please note: this is a Google translated message.


It is a popular saying that Brazil is a country without memory. Although we can criticize this famous maxim, the fact is that the country is full of endangered cultural assets, a patrimony that risks being lost forever. Whether due to lack of money, interest of the authorities or lack of knowledge of the population, several assets that make up the Brazilian cultural heritage are at high risk of loss of equity value. In various parts of Brazil, archival documents, books, buildings, public spaces, museum collections, practices, knowledge, languages ​​are in a state of deterioration or in danger of disappearing. Not to mention other parts of the world, where fragile state structures or wars endanger a priceless heritage for all mankind. To open a debate on this very important issue,

Papers will be received that contemplate a wide range of discussions about assets threatened, both empirically and theoretically, the risks to material and non-material assets, the treatment given to the issue in Brazil and in other countries, actions of multilateral institutions, as well as successful examples of reconstruction, revitalization or recovery. Also will be received free articles, translations, interviews and reviews. The submission deadline is April 13, 2018.

Submissions should be sent to the e-mail