CFP: Gender issues in Library and Information Science: Focusing on Visual Aspects

Guest Editor, Dr. Lesley S. J. Farmer

Description

Gender issues are capturing people’s attentions these days. One aspect of such attention is visual. How does the visual aspect of gender impact LIS? Possible gendered subtopics include, among others:

  • Cataloging visual resources
  • Visual literacy
  • Picture books
  • Media literacy visual aspects
  • Visual fake news and LIS: information professionals’ roles
  • Image editing: process, discernment, implications
  • Historical aspects (e.g., visually “reading” and interpreting historical documents with a gender frame)
  • Primary sources
  • LIS instruction
  • Visual implications for persons with visual impairments

How to Submit

Authors are kindly invited to register at our paper processing system at: http://www.editorialmanager.com/opis/ and submit their contribution.

Every manuscript should be clearly marked as intended for this special issue. All papers will go through the Open Information Science’s high standards, quick, fair and comprehensive peer-review procedure. Instructions for authors are available here. In case of any questions, please contact Guest Editor (Lesley.Farmer@csulb.edu) or Managing Editor (katarzyna.grzegorek@degruyteropen.com).

As an author of Open Information Science you will benefit from:

  • transparent, comprehensive and fast peer review managed by our esteemed Guest Editor;
  • efficient route to fast-track publication and full advantage of De Gruyter e-technology;
  • no publication fees;
  • free language assistance for authors from non-English speaking regions.

The deadline is September 1.

New Issue: Digital Humanities Quarterly

2018 12.2

Articles
Manuscript Study in Digital Spaces: The State of the Field and New Ways Forward
Bridget Almas, The Alpheios Project, Ltd.; Emad Khazraee, School of Information, Kent State University; Matthew Thomas Miller, Roshan Institute for Persian Studies, University of Maryland College Park; Joshua Westgard, University Libraries, University of Maryland College Park

BigDIVA and Networked Browsing: A Case for Generous Interfacing and Joyous Searching
Joel Schneier, North Carolina State University; Timothy Stinson, North Carolina State University; Matthew Davis, McMaster University

Predicting the Past
Tobias Blanke, King’s College London, Department of Digital Humanities

Reverse Engineering the First Humanities Computing Center
Steven Jones, University of South Florida

Issues in Digital Humanities
Methodological Nearness and the Question of Computational Literature
Michael Marcinkowski, Bath Spa University

Author Biographies

CFP: The Reading Room: A Journal of Special Collections

http://readingroom.lib.buffalo.edu/readingroom/

About the Journal
The Reading Room: A Journal of Special Collections is a scholarly journal committed to providing current research and relevant discussion of practices in a special collections library setting. The Reading Room seeks submissions from practitioners and students involved with working in special collections in museums, historical societies, corporate environments, public libraries and academic libraries. Topics may include exhibits, outreach, mentorship, donor relations, teaching, reference, technical and metadata skills, social media, “Lone Arrangers”, management and digital humanities. The journal features single-blind, peer-reviewed research articles and case studies related to all aspects of current special collections work.

CFP: Information & Culture: A Journal of History

http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions

Submissions
Information & Culture: A Journal of History welcomes submissions of research articles. Authors may submit a complete manuscript or may contact the editor with a proposal. You are encouraged to consult the journal’s home page, which gives an overview of the material published in Information & Culture.

Prospective authors should familiarize themselves with the broad topics covered by the journal (found on the about page) as well as the submission requirements and the peer review process. We expect authors to submit completed articles following all guidelines below. Papers that do not follow these guidelines will not be accepted for review. Please note, we do not accept papers that are currently under consideration for publication with another journal.

Content Requirements

  • Interpretive. Good history is about interpretation. Each article must have a historical thesis that is bolstered by an appropriate line of argument and credible evidence that is appropriately cited. Papers are expected to follow the methods of high-quality academic historical scholarship. Articles that are merely descriptive will not be accepted for publication.
  • Information History. All articles must be primarily historical in nature and primarily about information. If the relevance of information to the manuscript theme is not immediately clear, the author should add text as necessary to clarify the relationship, and to place the submission in a larger body of scholarship.
  • Language. Should be written in Standard English. Word choice should be precise and syntax should be clear. Articles written in a language other than grammatically correct English at a high academic level will not be considered.

Manuscript Requirements

  • Manuscript. Articles should typically range from 6,000-10,000 words. Longer articles will be considered in the context of whether the topic and treatment merits the extra length, and whether the journal has the space. Shorter articles may also be considered under certain circumstances.
  • Abstract. The article’s abstract should be no longer than 100 words and should be independent from the body of the article. Care should be taken to craft a clear and compelling abstract. Authors should bear in mind that the abstract is the first thing that the reader and any potential reviewers will see.
  • Keywords. Authors are encouraged to provide three to five keywords that capture the manuscript’s salient points. Keywords should be listed on a separate line on the title page.
  • Reviewers. Authors should submit, along with the manuscript, the names of at least two potential reviewers with expertise in the topic.
  • Endnotes. All citations should be provided as endnotes. Endnotes should be placed in a Notes section following the body of the manuscript. For a sentence with citations, there should be only one callout for all references cited within that sentence, and with few exceptions, that callout should be placed at the end of the sentence. Endnotes must be formatted electronically in MS Word and conform to “Humanities Style” in The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition. Notes should include all bibliographic information required by that style.
  • Acknowledgments. Acknowledgments are not required, but when included, should appear at the beginning of the Notes as an unnumbered endnote
  • Cover Sheet. Include a seperate page with article title, author name, mailing address, phone number, fax number, email address, and a 50-word biographical statement. For blind review purposes, do not include personal or institutional information on any page of the manuscript itself, including the abstract.

Manuscript Format

  • MS Word document in Times New Roman 12-point font
  • Text should follow The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition
  • All text should be one and a half spaced, including headings, long quotations, endnotes, and captions
  • One-inch margins on all sides
  • Page numbers in the upper right margin
  • All copy aligned left; do not justify
  • Paragraphs indented five spaces (0.25”) with a single tab
  • An extra line of space should be inserted above and below extracts, subheads, and figure/table/image callouts, but not between paragraphs
  • One space only after each period at the end of a sentence
  • Include first name and/or initial(s) of all persons when referred to in the manuscript for the first time
  • Spell out the title of an organization when first referenced, with acronym in parentheses. Acronyms may be used in all subsequent references
  • Tables should be submitted as separate MS Word files

Photos and Illustrations

  • Permissions are required for all published images. Should the article be accepted for publication, it is the responsibility of the author to obtain official written permission to reprint an image from the copyright holder or owner, including preferred wording for crediting the source of the image. Any cost involved is the responsibility of the author.
  • Figure captions should always include a source attribution and a statement of permission to use the image. Images obtained at no cost should attribute the source “Courtesy of…” while permissions obtained for a fee should state the source and “Used by permission.”
  • All images (photos, maps, or illustrations) to be included with a manuscript should be noted in the cover letter.
  • Images should be submitted as separate files (one file per image). Images submitted in Word documents are not acceptable.
  • Each image file should be at least 300 dpi at the size at which it is to be published.
  • Grayscale images in TIFF format are preferred, but most standard formats will be accepted.
  • Figure callouts should be placed in the manuscript on a separate line as Figure X Here, or similar text.
  • Figure captions should be placed at the end of the manuscript, after the Notes section.
  • The editor will make the final determination as to which images, if any, will be published.

Special Notes and Recommendations:
Non-native English speakers preparing a manuscript for submission to Information & Culture may wish to utilize one of the many professional English language editing services that specialize in academic journal manuscript preparation. Clearly written manuscripts help editorial staff and peer reviewers better evaluate the paper for its content, reducing the time required for the review process and resulting in a more competitive submission overall.

Please note, however, that the use of editing services is at the author’s own expense and does not guarantee that the article will be selected for peer review or accepted for publication in Information & Culture.

Submission Procedure
Once the manuscript meets the guidelines above, please submit via email to iceditor@ischool.utexas.edu.

CFP: Thanatos, special issue on “The Undead”

This is quite out of scope of the calls I normally post, but I’m quite intrigued by this call. As a profession that deals with the “undead” as defined below, there is definite potential for archivists to submit.

___________________________________________________

Thanatos is a peer-reviewed, multi-disciplinary open access journal (https://thanatos-journal.com/in-english/) published by the Finnish Death Studies Association (https://kuolemantutkimus.com/in-english/). The theme of the Thanatos spring issue in 2019 will be “The Undead”.

The phenomenon of undead – the deceased who are absent, yet simultaneously present in the minds of the living by affecting their perceived realities – is known in various cultural and historical contexts. Revenants, living dead, ghosts, wraiths, vampires, ancestor spirits, saintly apparitions, restless souls, zombies, corpses reanimated by magic, decapitated heads that speak, angels – death has not always been seen as the terminal point in public imaginations; the dead do not always stop living or cease to be. They may manifest physically or appear as incorporeal beings; they may be passive objects or active agents. Sometimes the border between the world of the living and the world of the dead is crossed in dreams, visions and apparitions, or through various ritualistic means.

Narratives of undead may depict them as upholders of social norms and traditions, as helpers or harassers, as seekers of retribution or even as pure entertainment. They have also offered sites of alternative discourse where the structures of power can be challenged, questioned and criticized. They may have represented communal concerns or symbolized psychological traumata. The undead may be passive objects of magic without any free will of their own; they may consist of a group of unindividualized spirits or appear as an abstract un-personified force. Being undead may have been considered a threat or an opportunity, a dead person’s punishment or even his/her right.

Thanatos welcomes papers that discuss the undead from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, across different source materials and cultural-historical contexts, to be published in the journal’s special theme issue. Topics covered may deal with such questions as:

Who, or what, are the undead? What is the role of the undead? What are the types and modes of their manifestation? What is the source of their existence? Where does the energy that reanimates, motivates or produces them originate from? What are the spaces (abstract or concrete ones) where the undead operate? What kind of culturally-mediated conceptions of the soul, the mind, individual and agency are reflected in people’s understanding of the undead? How have conceptions of the undead and of their agency changed as a consequence of various historical and cultural currents shaping people’s worldviews and ontological orientations (such as e.g. Christianization, secularization, urbanization, scientific and industrial revolutions).

We invite abstracts for articles to be submitted by September 5, 2018. The information about the acceptance of the articles will be sent by September 15th. The deadline for articles is November 30, 2018, after which the articles will go through a double-blind review process. The revised articles should be submitted by May 1, 2019. The estimated date of publication is in June, 2019.

The primary publication language in Thanatos is Finnish, but we also accept manuscripts in English and Swedish. (However, the costs of proofreading for non-native English or Swedish speakers are the responsibility of the author).

Abstracts are to be sent to the editors responsible for the theme issue, Kirsi Kanerva (University of Turku), ktkane@utu.fi and Miriam Mayburd (University of Iceland), mam24@hi.is.

For guidelines for the authors, please consult the journal web page at https://thanatos-journal.com/in-english/ (in English),https://thanatos-journal.com/pa-svenska/ (på svenska) or https://thanatos-journal.com/kirjoittajalle/ (suomeksi).

For further information, please contact Kirsi Kanerva (University of Turku), at ktkane@utu.fi.

CFP: Strange Circulations: Affect and the Library – A Special Issue of Library Trends

Guest Editors
Kate Adler, Metropolitan College of New York
Lisa Sloniowski, York University

Nature and Scope of Proposed Topic

From the unspoken emotional depth of our conversations at the reference desk, to the ambient politics of our spaces, to our engagement with public memory and knowledge production, affect fundamentally undergirds everyday life in the library. The editors of this special issue contend that the theoretical framework afforded by the “affective turn” can provide a sharp tool and generative language for naming, attending to and interrogating so much of what is alive beneath the surface in our work.

The attempt to theorize affect however, has proven a confusing project. Perhaps the first problem is that the concept itself is hard to define. In a special issue of Archival Science on the subject, Marika Cifor suggests that the affective turn represents more than just making affects, emotions and feelings legitimate objects of scholarly inquiry. …  At their core, definitions of affect understand it as a force that creates a relationship (conscious or otherwise) between a body (individual or collective) and the world (10).

She goes on to argue that affect is a socially, culturally and historically constructed category. As a theoretical framework, affect, she says, can provide a space to think about the interrelations between the psychic, the body and the social (10). Affective forces are crucial to our sense of place in the world, and affect is key to to the ways in which power is “constituted, circulated and mobilized”(Cifor 10).

Archives were a logical starting point for theorizing affect in the broad context of LIS. The emotional complexity of memory, of nostalgia, and history are pronounced in the archive. Libraries, however, remain under-theorized in the literature. This issue of Library Trends extends this new form of cultural criticism to libraries and library workers specifically. Working with Cifor’s definition, we might ask: how are libraries and librarians also attached to, or caught inside, affective forces?  Libraries are (often) more open and chaotic places than are archives. The web of affect in a library, therefore, has different stakes than in archives. Affect provides a lens on so much that is invisible – white supremacy, politics of gender and sexuality, complex class  dynamics, invisible labor, collective fantasies of knowledge and order – and making space to explore it can perform useful work in our field, bringing to the fore that which is sometimes obscured in our day to day practice and professional discourse.

More broadly, in “Strange Circulations: Affect and the Library,” we also hope to make a new intervention in wider interdisciplinary conversations regarding the affective register of myriad nodes of work, life and knowledge production.

List of Potential Articles

The following is a list of possible themes that we hope might provoke writers to share their work with us. Our hope is that authors tie a clearly articulated theory of affect to a vision of librarianship, particularly one that doesn’t lose sight of the material and historical consequences of our work. This list is not meant to be exhaustive or prescriptive. Ideally we would have a range of articles across most fields and sectors of librarianship.

  • Affective encounters with students, patrons, or faculty
  • Affective networks in digital librarianship and digital libraries
  • Memory and library collections: decolonizing, indigenizing, queering
  • Censorship/Filtering debates and the affect of moral panic
  • Radical cataloging as affective labour
  • Bibliographic space and the organizing of affect
  • Affective flow and the architecture and design of libraries.
  • Creating community space
  • Intimacy and aesthetics of embodiment in the library
  • Librarianship and emotional labor
  • Affects of trauma: homeless patrons, overdosing patrons, abandoned children, library anxiety, sexual assaults in libraries
  • Public service and the ethics of care work
  • Affect in narratives of the “future of the library”
  • Affective professional attachments: library neutrality, neoliberalism, neo-utilitarianism
  • Affective fantasies of libraries: libraries as symbols, librarian stereotypes and subjectivities,  imaginary libraries
  • Affects of subversion and transgression, rebellion, revolution, resistance, reading
  • Affect, libraries, & theoretical engagements: Queer, Critical Disability Studies, Critical Race Studies, Anti-Colonialism, Feminism, Political Economy

List of Possible Formats

  • Scholarly/research articles – theoretically informed analyses, historical explorations, and/or articles based in qualitative or mixed research methods
  • Photographic essays – (black and white only)
  • Book reviews/interviews/oral histories/roundtable reports

The editors are open to considering other formats although we have a preference for those listed above. If you have an idea for another format feel free to contact the editors to discuss. Complete articles are expected to be in the 4,000-10,000 word range. More information about the stylistic guidelines can be found here: Author Instructions for the Preparation of Articles

Proposal Requirements

Abstracts and proposals should be no more than 500 words. Please include a brief author biography with contact details as well.

Contact the editors at strangecirculations@gmail.com

Timeline

  • Proposals due: September 1st, 2018.
  • Notification: October 1st, 2018
  • First Draft due: January 7th 2019.
  • Expected Publication Date: Winter 2020

Works Cited

Cifor, Marika. “Affecting Relations: Introducing Affect Theory to Archival Discourse.” Archival Science, vol. 16, no. 1, Mar. 2016, pp. 7–31. link.springer.com, doi:10.1007/s10502-015-9261-5.

https://www.press.jhu.edu/cfp-strange-circulations-affect-and-library

CFP: Libraries and Archives in the Anthropocene – JCLIS special issue

Guest Editors: John Burgess, Robert D. Montoya, Eira Tansey

As stewards of collective knowledge, librarians, archivists, and educators in the information fields are facing the realities of the Anthropocene, which has the potential for cataclysmic environmental change, with a dawning awareness of its unique implications for their missions and activities. The Anthropocene is a proposed designation for an epoch of geological time in which human activity has led to significant and irrevocable changes to the Earth’s atmosphere, geology, and biosphere. Some professionals in these fields are focusing new energies on the need for environmentally sustainable practices in their institutions. Some are prioritizing the role of libraries and archives in supporting climate change communication and influencing government policy and public awareness. Others foresee an inevitable unraveling of systems and ponder the role of libraries and archives in a world much different from the one we take for granted. Climate disruption, continued reliance on fossil fuels, toxic waste, deforestation, soil exhaustion, agricultural crisis, depletion of groundwater, loss of biodiversity, mass migration, sea level rise, and extreme weather events are problems that threaten to overwhelm civilization’s knowledge infrastructures, and present information institutions with unprecedented challenges.

This special issue of the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies (JCLIS) will serve as a space to explore these challenges and establish directions for future efforts and investigations. We invite proposals from academics, librarians, archivists, activists, museum professionals, and others.

Some suggested topics and questions:
– How can information institutions operate more sustainably?
– How can information scholars and professionals better serve the needs of policy discussions and public awareness with respect to climate change and other threats to the environment?
– How can information institutions support skillsets and technologies that are relevant following systemic unraveling?
– What will information work look like without the infrastructures we take for granted?
– How does information literacy instruction intersect with ecoliteracy?
– How can information professionals support or participate in radical environmental activism?
– What are the implications of climate change for disaster preparedness?
– What role do information workers have in addressing issues of environmental justice? How do such issues of environmental justice relate to other forms of social justice?
– What are the implications of climate change for preservation practices?
– Should we question the wisdom of preserving access to the technological cultural legacy that has led to the current environmental crisis? Why or why not?
– Is there a responsibility to document, as a mode of bearing witness, society’s confrontation with the causes of significant environmental problems?
– Given the ideological foundations of libraries and archives in Enlightenment thought, and given that Enlightenment civilization may be leading to its own environmental endpoint, are these ideological foundations called into question? And with what consequences?
– What role do MLIS, MIS, iSchools, and other graduate (and undergraduate) programs have to play in relation to the aforementioned issues?

Deadline for Submission: September 9, 2018

Types of Submissions

JCLIS welcomes the following types of submissions:

Research Articles (no more than 7,000 words)
Perspective Essays (no more than 5,000 words)
Literature Reviews (no more than 7,000 words)
Interviews (no more than 5,000 words)
Book or Exhibition Reviews (no more than 1,200 words)
Research articles and literature reviews are subject to peer review by two referees. Perspective essays are subject to peer review by one referee. Interviews and book or exhibition reviews are subject to review by the issue editor(s).

Contacts

Please direct questions to the guest editors for the issue:

John Burgess, University of Alabama: jtfburgess@ua.edu
Robert D. Montoya, Indiana University, Bloomington: montoya@indiana.edu
Eira Tansey, University of Cincinnati: eira.tansey@uc.edu

Submission Guidelines for Authors

The Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies welcomes submissions from senior and junior faculty, students, activists, and practitioners working in areas of research and practice at the intersection of critical theory and library and information studies.

Authors retain the copyright to material they publish in the JCLIS, but the Journal cannot re-publish material that has previously been published elsewhere. The journal also cannot accept manuscripts that have been simultaneously submitted to another outlet for possible publication.

Citation Style

JCLIS uses the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th Edition as the official citation style for manuscripts published by the journal. All manuscripts should employ the Notes and Bibliography style (as footnotes with a bibliography), and should conform to the guidelines as described in the Manual.

Submission Process

Manuscripts are to be submitted through JCLIS’ online submission system (http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis) by September 9, 2018. This online submission process requires that manuscripts be submitted in separate stages in order to ensure the anonymity of the review process and to enable appropriate formatting.

Abstracts (500 words or less) should be submitted in plain text and should not include information identifying the author(s) or their institutional affiliations. With the exception of book reviews, an abstract must accompany all manuscript submissions before they are reviewed for publication.
The main text of the manuscript must be submitted as a stand-alone file (in Microsoft Word or RTF)) without a title page, abstract, page numbers, or other headers or footers. The title, abstract, and author information should be submitted through the submission platform.