CFP: Journal of Map and Geography Libraries Call for Papers: Special Issue on Information Literacy Instruction

This call mentions primary source instruction.

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The Journal of Map & Geography Libraries invites articles highlighting practice and research-based approaches on the ways changes in information literacy philosophies have redefined/reimagined information literacy instruction in academic libraries. For this special issue we would like to include articles focusing on library instruction across all types of libraries that highlight creative approaches to student learning.

The purpose of this special issue is to expose map and geospatial information librarians to a wide range of instructional approaches in order to inspire new, creative ideas and collaborations for spatial literacy instruction.

We expect an interesting range of contributions, from traditional research studies to design cases and opinion pieces supported by literature and/or practice. Examples and experiences from outside the traditional boundaries of instructional design and educational technology will also enrich the discussion.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

Geospatial data literacy instruction
Application of the ACRL Information Literacy Framework to spatial literacy instruction
Primary source instruction
Curriculum mapping for information literacy
Embedded librarianship
The flipped classroom model in library instruction
Active learning in library instruction
Assessment
Practices and challenges in distance learning instruction

Article abstracts are due May 19, 2019 with full articles due August 30, 2019. After abstract submission, authors will be notified of acceptance by May 31, 2019.

Send article abstracts jmgleditors2@gmail.com with the subject: Instruction Special Issue

New Issue: Archival Science

Archival Science, Volume 19, Issue 1, March 2019

Archives as places, places as archives: doors to privilege, places of connection or haunted sarcophagi of crumbling skeletons?
Belinda Battley

“Something that feels like a community”: the role of personal stories in building community-based participatory archives
Ana Roeschley, Jeonghyun Kim

Unpacking the boxes of Adão Ventura’s archive: reflections on the black poet in the literary archive
Gustavo Tanus

New Issue: Records Management Journal

Records Management Journal, Volume 29 Issue 1/2

Guest editorial
Elizabeth Lomas, Basma Makhlouf Shabou, Arina Grazhenskaya

Perspectives on the relationship between records management and information governance
Julie Brooks

The influence of organizational culture on information governance effectiveness
Ali Daneshmandnia

The defensible deletion of government email
James Lappin, Tom Jackson, Graham Matthews, Ejovwoke Onojeharho

A must for agencies or a candidate for deletion: A grounded theory investigation of the relationships between records management and information security
Sherry Li Xie

Theory, regulation and practice in Swedish digital records appraisal
Elisabeth Klett

An integrated framework to elevate information governance to a national level in South Africa
Paul Anthony Mullon, Mpho Ngoepe

Leadership and political will for implementation of the access to information (ATI) Act (2016) in Kenya
Victor Kabata, Francis Garaba

The impact of new public management through outsourcing on the management of government information: The case of Sweden
Proscovia Svärd

Open government data: critical information management perspectives
Elizabeth Shepherd, Jenny Bunn, Andrew Flinn, Elizabeth Lomas, Anna Sexton, Sara Brimble, Katherine Chorley, Emma Harrison, James Lowry, Jessica Page

The role of information governance in e-discovery – the case of China
Guanyan Fan

Participatory information governance: Transforming recordkeeping for childhood out-of-home Care
Joanne Evans, Sue McKemmish, Gregory Rolan

Balancing information governance obligations when accessing social care data for collaborative research
Malkiat Thiarai, Sarunkorn Chotvijit, Stephen Jarvis

The role of archives and records management legislation after colonialism in Africa: Case of Southern Africa
Nkholedzeni Sidney Netshakhuma

The inevitability of digital transfer: How prepared are UK public bodies for the transfer of born-digital records to the archives?
Lale Özdemir

“The margin between the edge of the world and infinite possibility”: Blockchain, GDPR and information governance
Darra Hofman, Victoria Louise Lemieux, Alysha Joo, Danielle Alves Batista

The monistic diversity of continuum informatics: A method for analysing the relationships between recordkeeping informatics, ethics and information governance
Frank Upward

Situating trust challenges of online trade
Tove Engvall

New Issue: New Review of Information Networking

There are several articles in this journal issue that highlight archives and digital content.

New Review of Information Networking, Volume 23, 2018 – Issue 1-2

Using Web Analytics to Assess Traffic to the Mandela Portal: The Case of African Countries
Shadrack Katuu

IT Governance of Dutch Municipalities and Digital Information Management
Jeanine de Gier

Accelerating Records Management at CERN
Andrew Short

Relative Advantages of Digital Preservation Management in Developing Countries
Eric Boamah

A Case Study: Management and Exploitation of the Nuclear Decommissioning Agency Geoscience Data Archive
Jaana Pinnick ORCID Icon, Andrew Riddick, Robert McLaverty & Garry Baker

CFP: Special Issue, Meta: Translators’ Journal

Meta: Translators’ Journal calls for papers dedicated to the archives of literary translators. Literary authorship has long been studied from a genetic perspective, yet only recently have literary translators’ working documents—their research notes, drafts, revisions, proofs, their manuscripts, contracts and correspondence—become a focus of translation process research. The emergence of genetic translation studies (Cordingley and Montini 2015) has coincided with a heightened interest in translators’ creativity and agency stimulated by post-structuralist and sociological approaches, and the advent of ‘translator studies’. Despite a growing number of case studies engaging with translators’ avant-textes, translation studies is yet to have its ‘archival turn’. Unlike other disciplines in the humanities, such as philosophy, literature, history, or sociology, in translation studies there has been little reflection upon the concept or function of the archive. Historically, most translators’ papers survived incidentally, because the translator was also a literary author. However, the general revaluing of translation and the rise of translation studies has begun to attract institutional investment in the form of the purchasing or collecting of translators’ papers, manuscripts and materials, and the creation of translation archives.

Articles are encouraged to introduce transdisciplinary perspectives that resonate with theories or notions of the archive in other disciplines. The translation archive can be conceptualised within book history or sociological approaches to the archive as an artefact or space inscribed with the material history of a translator’s work—such as a hard drive, box of manuscript pages, a private study, an office, an online forum, a curated collection, an uncatalogued library holding—sites that witness the labour of translation and its relationship to its environment, collaborators and other semiotic systems. It may be conceptualised within the parameters of genetic criticism as a dossier génétique, a series of texts that attest a translation’s genesis over time to reveal the evolution of translation strategies. It can be approached from the perspectives of library and information sciences and archive studies to elucidate the value, place and function of translation archives within the development and organisation of libraries and collections, as well as the acquisition, documentation, cataloguing and  communication practices that affect translators’ archives and their use by the public,
researchers or translators themselves—in short, how records of translation and users interact to make meaning.

Researchers of other disciplines are invited, furthermore, to consider how recognising the presence and dynamics of translation may shift their own relationship to the archive. Can translation studies offer other fields with tools to interrogate their historical or theoretical understanding of the archive? Can it challenge existing attitudes to translation within archival spaces? What can a translational turn offer studies of the archive in fields beyond translation studies? Articles for this special issue may therefore address one or more of the following questions:

  • What is a ‘translation archive’ and how are translation archives formed? Why do the materials of certain literary translators survive while others are lost or forgotten? What are the epistemological and ontological particularities of different kinds of translation archives?
  • What methodologies are available to researchers of translation archives and what can translation researchers learn from cognate disciplines that study and theorise archives? How do archival approaches enrich translation analysis, and what are their limits or limitations? What criteria should be used when evaluating the claims of archival research? What can knowledge of translation dynamics and translation studies offer archival studies?
  • What is the importance of informal archives produced by online networks, community groups, fans, volunteers? What are the challenges for researchers approaching archives found outside of libraries and institutional settings? What challenges does the proliferation of personal computers, translation technologies,
    translation memories and other digital media pose for archival approaches to translation studies

Abstracts of no more than 600 words to be submitted by 1st of May 2019

Submission of completed articles in English, French or Spanish by 1st of December 2019

Please send an abstract with short biographical note to  translationarchives.meta@gmail.com

CFP: special issue on Information Management and Digital Information

The journal Open Information Science is seeking papers for a special issue on Information Management and Digital Information to be published in December 2019.

  • Deadline for extended abstracts: 31 May 2019
  • Notification of acceptance to authors: 15 June 2019
  • Deadline for full articles: 30 September 2019
  • Publication: December 2019-Spring 2020

Topics might include, but are not restricted to:

  • Historical accounts of the development of information management
  • Systematic reviews of contextualised information management (by industry sector, jurisdiction)
  • Theoretical models of information management (including comparative analyses)
  • Information management issues in “niche” sectors
  • Information management professions and professionals (for example education and training, career paths, de-professionalism)
  • Implications of open science for information management
  • Participatory culture and information management (including marginal practitioners in online communities, crowdsourcing information and data, open public data)
  • Regulatory and ethical issues in information management

Abstracts and Submissions

Please send an extended abstract (maximum 1,500 words) by 31 May 2019 to the guest editor Adrienne Muir, Professor of Information Management, Robert Gordon University (a.muir3@rgu.ac.uk). Submitted abstracts should be in English.  The guest editor will evaluated abstracts and will inform authors of acceptance or rejection by 30 June 2019.

All submitted articles will be subject to peer review. Therefore, the acceptance of an extended abstract does not imply the publication of the final text unless the article has passed the peer review and revisions (if required) have been made to the text.

New Issue: Journal of Western Archives

Articles

Review