New Issue: ESARBICA Journal

ESARBICA Journal: Journal of the Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Branch of the International Council on Archives – Vol 37 (2018)
(subscription)

Articles
Effects of document format types and employees’ attitudes towards documents creation and records management
Eric Boamah

Strategies for preservation of digital records in Masvingo province of Zimbabwe
Blessed Magama

Towards a framework for e-records readiness in support of e-government in eSwatini
Vusi Tsabedze, Trywell Kalusopa

A framework for e-records in support of e-government implementation in the Tanzanian public service
Gwakisa Kamatula, Henry Kemoni

Risks associated with cloud computing in pursuit of effective records management
Cameron Bassett, Isabel Schellnack-Kelly

A framework for acquisition, transfer and preservation of knowledge of traditional healing in South Africa: a case of Limpopo province
Jan Resenga Maluleka, Patrick Ngulube

The archives of the Catholic Church in South Africa
Philippe Denis

Access to government information: a global phenomenon but what are the challenges?
Proscovia Svärd

Implications of records management policy for the small and medium enterprises sustainability in Raymond Mhlaba municipality in South Africa
Patrick Ajibade, Festus Khayundi

A service delivery improvement strategy for a records management programme
Liah Shonhe, Balulwami Grand

Assessing the implementation of the National Archives and Records Service Act at Eduardo Mondlane University in Mozambique
Renato Pereira

New Issue: Archivaria

Archivaria 86 (Fall 2018)
(subscription)

Articles
Looking for a Place to Happen: Collective Memory, Digital Music Archiving, and the Tragically Hip
Alan Galey

Omelettes in the Stack: Archival Fragility and the Aforeafter
Antonina Lewis

Leaving a Trail: Personal Papers and Public Archives Part One – The Donor’s Story
Betsy Hearne

Leaving a Trail: Personal Papers and Public Archives Part Two – The Archivist’s Story
Susanne Belovari

The Reconfiguration of the Archive as Data to Be Mined
Michael Moss, David Thomas, Tim Gollins

Integrated Online Access to Objects and Archives
Jinfang Niu

Book Reviews
David Thomas, Simon Fowler, and Valerie Johnson, The Silence of the Archive
Rodney G.S. Carter

Philip C. Bantin, ed., Building Trustworthy Digital Repositories: Theory and Implementation
Maxwell Otte

Exhibition Reviews
Shalom Montreal: Stories and Contributions of the Jewish Community, McCord Museum
Sarah Nantel

Carol Sawyer: The Natalie Brettschneider Archive, Vancouver Art Gallery
Alexandra Wieland

CFP: IFLA Journal special issue on Information Literacy

IFLA Journal and IFLA’s Library Theory and Research (LTR)and Information Literacy (IL) Sections are pleased to announce a call for papers for a special issue focused on theory and practice in information literacy.  With the potential to transform lives and societies, the importance of information literacy is appreciated world-wide. Our understandings of information literacy come from across the globe and ranges in focus from practice-based to highly theoretical; from everyday life to education and workplace settings; and for infants through to the elderly.

Guest Editors:

Dr. Gaby Haddow
Libraries, Archives, Records & Information Science
School of Media, Creative Arts & Social Inquiry
Curtin University
Australia

Dr. Min Chou
Congressman Frank J. Guarini Library
New Jersey City University
United States

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • building new theory in information literacy;
  • the challenges of applying theory in practice;
  • the technology dimension in theoretical frameworks;
  • how learning theories can inform practice; and
  • cultural perspectives associated with learning.

Submission Deadline:

Articles for the special issue should be submitted to IFLA Journal for peer review before 30 June 2019.

How to Submit a Manuscript

IFLA Journal is hosted on ScholarOne™ Manuscripts, a web based online submission and peer review system SAGE Track. Please read the Manuscript Submission guidelines, and then simply visit the IFLA Journal Manuscript submission webpage to login and submit your article online.

IMPORTANT: Please check whether you already have an account in the system before trying to create a new one. If you have reviewed or authored for the journal in the past year it is possible that you will have had an account created.

All papers must be submitted via the online system. If you would like to discuss your paper prior to submission, please contact Steven Witt, Editor of IFLA Journal; or guest editors Gaby Haddow and Min Chou.

For instructions on formatting your manuscript please consult the submission guidelines.

About IFLA Journal

IFLA Journal is an international journal publishing peer reviewed articles on library and information services and the social, political and economic issues that impact access to information through libraries. The Journal publishes research, case studies and essays that reflect the broad spectrum of the profession internationally. All articles are subject to peer review. Articles are published in English. Abstracts will be translated by IFLA (the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions) into the other working languages of IFLA—Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Russian or Spanish—for publication.

IFLA Journal is published by Sage Publications and is the official journal of IFLA, and has an international readership consisting of academic institutions, professional organizations, and IFLA members who all receive a free subscription to the journal.

Each issue of IFLA Journal is made available Open Access upon publication on IFLA’s website.  Authors are also encouraged to make the accepted version of their manuscripts available in their personal or institutional repositories.

IFLA Journal is indexed by the following databases:

  • Abi/inform
  • Academic Search Premier
  • Business Source Corporate
  • Compendex
  • Current Awareness Abstracts
  • IBZ: International Bibliography of Periodical Literature
  • IBZ: International Bibliography of Periodical Literature in the Humanities and Social Sciences
  • Information Science and Technology Abstracts
  • Inspec
  • Library Information Science Abstracts
  • Library Literature & Information Science
  • SciVal
  • Scopus
  • Sociological Abstracts
  • Web of Science

New Issue: Comma

Volume 2017, Issue 1, 2018
(subscription)

Preface
David Sutton

Articles

Literary archives around the world: the view from Namibia
Veno V. Kauaria David Sutton

Learning and teaching with literary archives
Heather Dean

Keeping born-digital literary and artistic archives in an imperfect world: theory, best practice and good enoughs
Sebastian Gurciullo

Outside the margins and beyond the page: complex digital literature, the new horizon for acquisition, conservation, curation and research
Catherine Hobbs Sara Viinalass-Smith

What to do with literary manuscripts? A model for manuscript studies after 1700
Wim Van Mierlo

Where are our heroes, martyrs and monuments? Archives of authors, publishers and editors from the Caribbean diaspora in London institutions
Deborah Jenkins

Literary correspondence: letters and emails in Caribbean writing
Marta Fernández Campa

Archives at risk: addressing a global concern
Jens Boel David C. Sutton

Management of archival literary sources: the Greek approach
Marietta Minotos Anna Koulikourdi

Research, re-cataloguing and acquisition policy: new developments at the Archive of the Finnish Literature Society
Katri Kivilaakso

Архивы культуры в России
Т.М. Горяева

Building on the Huntington Library’s literary foundation
Sara S. Hodson

A location list of literary archives in Brazil
Luciana Negrini David Sutton

Call for papers: GKMC special issue on Community and small archives

Call for papers: GKMC special issue on Community and small archives. Submission deadline: 15 February 2019.

This is a call for papers on community and small archives for a special issue of Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication

Recently there has been noticeable growth in discussion around community and small archives. Such archives may be stand-alone or part of other organisations such as schools, universities, historic societies, churches, cultural or indigenous communities, and local government or quasi-government organisations. They are often the result of local or community initiatives (where community does not necessarily have a geographic meaning). The notion of critical archiving and giving voice to the marginalised and non-elites is another important aspect, and community archives are considered to challenge the dominant modes of archival practice. Yet the realities of day-to-day practice in small archives are not widely understood or acknowledged by the mainstream or formal archive sector, and it can be difficult to identify key themes or concerns for community and small archives.

Papers are requested that explore the nature and use of community and small archives, their collections and management, and their place in the wider cultural heritage industries. Practitioner perspectives and case studies are especially encouraged.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:
* Community archives and digital heritage
* The management of community and small archives including the use of volunteers, access, funding, governance, and strategy
* Diversity and discrimination vs the neutrality of the archives
* Social justice and community archives
* The nature and diversity of collections in community archives including digital collections and the issues around digital preservation and/or digitisation
* The use of community archives in digital humanities and local history
* Training and professional development for community archivists and archives staff
* Case studies and practitioner perspectives on the role, purpose, and place of community archives
* Cross-sectoral and shared practice around small and community archives or collections
* The place of community archives in the wider archival environment
* The place of community archives in the cultural heritage industries

Submission deadline: 15 February 2019

Guest Editors:
Sarah Welland
Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
sarah.welland@openpolytechnic.ac.nz

Dr Amanda Cossham
Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
amanda.cossham@openpolytechnic.ac.nz

Further information can be found here: Community and small archives: evaluating, preserving, accessing, and engaging with community-based archival heritage http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/call_for_papers.htm?id=8127

CFP: Special Issue of The Journal of Popular Culture: Archives and Popular Culture

Guest Editors      

  • Rüstem Ertuğ Altınay, University of Vienna
  • Olivera Jokic, City University of New York

Description

This special issue explores the intricate relationship between archives and popular culture: how archives shape our understanding of “popular culture,” and how diverse forms of popular culture shape conceptions and contents of archives. Conventional conceptualizations of the archive as the repository of authoritative historical documents, assembled and maintained by institutions of the state, have increasingly been challenged. Formation of repositories, in public and private, of materials created by individuals who lack epistemic authority has been of interest not only to historians looking for traces of their lives. Especially through diverse forms of popular culture—from books, photography, video, and music to statues and garments—archives have taken on new lives to become part of public culture. In such cultural products, that which ostensibly belongs to history shapes how we understand the past, can experience the present, and imagine the future.

While both mainstream and unorthodox archives gain new lives in and through popular culture, they also challenge our contemporary conceptions of “popular culture” by revealing how the definitions of popular culture have changed, and how new genres of documentation have emerged and disappeared over time. With the profound transformation of the recording media and conceptions of literacy, these processes have reached an unprecedented speed. As more people have acquired access to recording, distribution, and preservation of written and visual texts with broad availability of high-speed Internet connections, the time difference between the moment of recording and the moment of historiography has shrunk beyond measure. The archive is still about the past, but the past may appear closer than ever to the present.

The questions we would like to explore include, but are not limited to:

  • What is the role of the archive in defining what is popular?
  • Can archives be classified as products of popular culture? When and how do some archives become popular?
  • What would an archive of popularity look like?
  • How do archives reproduce or challenge our conceptions of the popular?
  • How does popular culture produce unorthodox archives?
  • How do artifacts of popular culture use archives to create continuity or difference between the past and the present?
  • How do archives of the popular shape the desires and imaginations of the future?
  • How do minoritarian producers of popular culture use or re-define archives of oppression and dominance? What prospects and limitations are involved in such endeavors?
  • What are the affective politics of archival praxis, and how do they unravel in the context of popular culture?
  • What has been the effect of the digital and mobile technologies on the relationship between the archive and popular culture?

If you are interested in contributing to this special issue, please send a 300-word abstract to the editors, Rüstem Ertuğ Altınay (rea270@nyu.edu) and Olivera Jokic (ojokic@jjay.cuny.edu), by November 30, 2018. Authors will be notified in early December 2018 whether they should submit a full version of their article for peer review. Full-length articles of 5,000–7,500 words will be due by December 1, 2019. Please note that final decisions about publication will depend on the peer-review process.

New/Recent Articles

Recovering tarnished 19th-century images,” College & Research Library News, Vol. 79 no. 9 (2018)
Gary Pattillo

Digital curation: the development of a discipline within information science,” Journal of Documentation, Vol. 74 Issue: 6
Sarah Higgins

Images of women in sport and physical education part 2: Building and integrating a digital exhibit site into the classroom,” Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship
Volume 30, 2018 – Issue 2
Brenda L. Meese & Julia Chance Gustafson

Personal archives and the writing of history in Brazil: a critical balance,” Brazilian Journal of History vol.38 no.78
Paulo Teixeira Iumatti, Thiago Lima Nicodemo

Informal Archives: Historical Narratives and the Preservation of Paper in India’s Urban Slums,” Studies in Comparative International Development, September 2018, Volume 53, Issue 3
Adam Michael Auerbach

Towards a Model for the Evaluation and Planning of the Development of Education for Library, Archive and Information Services,” Library and Information Research Vol 42, No 126 (2018)
Ian Martin Johnson

Special Collections: What Are They and How Do We Build Them?International Journal of Legal Information Volume 46, Issue 2 July 2018
Vanessa King

Teaching the Future of Technology in the History Classroom: A Case Study,” World Futures Review Volume: 10 issue: 4
David J. Staley

Bodies of Evidence: Understanding the Transformation of Collections from Individuals to Institutions,” Library Trends Volume 66, Number 4, Spring 2018
Liana H. Zhou

The power of agentic women and SOURCES,” Social Studies Research and Practice, Vol. 13 Issue: 2
Scott M. Waring

Lifting the Veil: Digitizing Black Archives at Tuskegee University,” The Public Historian Vol. 40 No. 3, August 2018
Dana R. Chandler

Building a Home for the Past: Archives and the Geography of American Jewish History,” American Jewish History Volume 102, Number 3, July 2018
Jason Lustig

Archiving the IAWS Journey: From Six Steel Cupboards to Oral Narratives—Organising, Digitising, Documenting,” Indian Journal of Gender Studies Volume: 25 issue: 3
Sumi Krishna