Call for Proposals for The Handbook of Archival Practice

This is your opportunity to contribute to the development of an indispensable guide designed to meet the demands of records and archival professionals increasingly tasked with responsibility for hybrid materials: The Handbook of Archival Practice.

This work—written by experienced practitioners for current and aspiring practitioners—will cover all aspects of contemporary archival practice from records creation control through long-term preservation. Relevant archives- and records-related practices such as digital signatures, social media archiving, content management systems, and cybersecurity measures will be included.

This is NOT a dictionary, glossary, nor encyclopedia. It is a Handbook divided into ten sections—each with multiple topics not only describing activities (such as appraisal, digitization, reference services) but also providing examples of how they are or might be applied in the workplace. Checklists, images, graphics, and other materials are solicited and will be considered for inclusion. The institution at which the practices took place may remain anonymous if desired.

A website, The Handbook of Archival Practice, at https://thapproject.org/ provides additional information about the project, the editor, the distinguished members of the advisory board, and the proposal submission process (with a link to the proposal submission form).

The Survey Monkey submission form is now open to accept your proposals at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/TheHandbookofArchivalPractice. It will remain open throughout the project, which will be submitted to the editor by January 31, 2021.  Successful proposals will be accepted as received and approved for inclusion.  Those who submit early have the best chance of being accepted to write about the topic of their choice.

The editorial advisory board will assist in reviewing the proposals, but the final decisions remain with the editor.

As a thank you, each contributor, regardless of the length or number of entries, will be provided by the publisher, Rowman & Littlefield, with one hard copy of the finished publication, as well as the opportunity to purchase additional copies at 50% off. Each contributor will also be credited in the Handbook.

Questions should be directed to the editor, Dr. Patricia C. Franks, at patricia.franks@sjsu.edu

 

 

 

 

 

Call for Chapters: Engaging Undergraduates in Primary Source Research

Dear colleagues,

I am soliciting chapter proposals for a book titled Engaging Undergraduates in Primary Source Research. Part of Rowman & Littlefield’s Innovations in Information Literacy series, this book seeks to present success stories of how faculty and librarians can create and facilitate engaging and productive learning experiences with primary sources in the undergraduate classrooms. The co-authored chapters (5,000 words) by librarians and their faculty partners will showcase the work of librarians from various areas of library operations and their faculty collaborators in different disciplines, including the sciences and social sciences.

Sample topics include:

  • Constructing settler colonialism from the indigenous perspectives
  • Understanding human-and-nature dynamics through local landscapes
  • Exploring the legacy of the Black Arts Movement through music
  • Mapping and tracing the globalization of commodities

Each case study should center on how students learn and practice information literacy competencies through their engagement with primary sources. By focusing on competencies that are applicable and transferrable across disciplinary boundaries, the case studies and the featured activities and assignments should be easily adopted by faculty and librarians to enhance or transform their primary source-related teaching practices.

Chapter structure:

  • Why the faculty member teaches with primary sources
  • The institutional context
  • How the faculty-librarian collaboration came about
  • What the collaboration involves: conversations, assignments and activities, library sessions and class discussions, etc.
    • Include guidelines—the ACRL Information Literacy Framework, the Primary Source Literacy guidelines, and discipline-specific guidelines—if they have informed your work.
  • Outcomes and assessment
  • Reflection
  • Conclusion

Timeline:

  • 600-800 word chapter proposal and tentative title—November 1, 2019
  • Notification of proposal acceptance—early January, 2020
  • First draft of the completed chapter—May 31, 2020
  • Feedback to contributors—July 31, 2020
  • Revised chapter to the editor—September 15, 2020
  • Feedback, including if the chapter draft is accepted or declined—November 15, 2020
  • Final draft to the editor—February, 2021

Please send your proposal, including author names, titles, and affiliations, to xul@lafayette.edu. Please feel free to contact me with any questions.

Editor: Lijuan Xu, Associate Director of Research & Instructional Services

Skillman Library, Lafayette College, Easton, PA  18042

Call for Chapters: Digital Technologies and Indigenous and Marginalized Communities

Call for book chapters on the preservation and advancement of indigenous and marginalized communities through the creative use of digital technologies: book to be published by Rowman and Littlefield in 2019.

This is a call for book chapters that focus on the preservation and advancement of indigenous and marginalized communities through the creative use of digital technologies. While it is expected contributing authors will come primarily from memory institutions (archives, museums and libraries), contributors from academic and non-profit organizations are also welcome.  Essay may address theoretical issues, scholarly research or case studies at the authors’ institutions.

Please send a one-page abstract to Marta Deyrup  (Marta.Deyrup@shu.edu) by September 17th.

Do not hesitate to contact me if you would like more information or would like to discuss your ideas in advance.

Dr. Marta Deyrup
University Libraries
Seton Hall University
Marta.deyrup@shu.edu
Web: https://works.bepress.com/marta_deyrup/

Call for ALISE Book Series Proposals (Association for Library and Information Science Education)

The ALISE Book Series, published by Rowman & Littlefield, addresses issues critical to Library and Information Science education and research through the publication of epistemologically grounded scholarly texts which are inclusive of regional and national contexts around the world.

Series Editors

Call for Proposals

Before submitting your proposal for the series, please review the guidelines.

Proposals relating to education and/or research in the following broad areas, inter alia, are welcome:

  • Education of library and information professionals
  • Socio-cultural or international perspectives in library and information services
  • Information and communication technologies
  • Cultural heritage preservation and promotion
  • Data and knowledge management
  • Data science
  • Human-computer interaction and design
  • Information organization and retrieval
  • Information services and practices

About ALISE

The Association for Library and Information Science Education is a non-profit organization that serves as the intellectual home of faculty, staff, and students in Library and Information Science and allied disciplines. It promotes innovation and excellence internationally through leadership, collaboration, advocacy, and dissemination of scholarship.

New/Recent Books

Information Systems: Process and Practice
Edited by Christine Urquhart, Faten Hamad, Dina Tbaishat, and Alison Yeoman

The Stuff of Bits: An Essay on the Materialities of Information 
by Paul Douris

Capturing Our Stories: An Oral History of Librarianship in Transition
A. Arro Smith

The Silence of the Archive
David Thomas, Simon Fowler, and Valerie Johnson

Creating Exhibits That Engage: A Manual for Museums and Historical Organizations
John Summers

Cultural Heritage Care and Management: Theory and Practice
edited by Cecilia Lizama Salvatore

Things Great and Small: Collections Management Policies, Second Edition
John E. Simmons

Commemoration: The American Association for State and Local History Guide
edited by Seth C. Bruggeman

An American Association for State and Local History Guide to Making Public History
edited by Bob Beatty

Fostering Empathy Through Museums
edited by Elif M. Gokcigdem

Practical Preservation and Conservation Strategies for Libraries
Brian J. Baird, illustrated by Jody Brown

Directory of Rare Book and Special Collections in the UK and Republic of Ireland, 3rd edition
edited by Karen Attar

Linked Data for Cultural Heritage
edited by Ed Jones and Michele Seikel

Open Licensing for Cultural Heritage
Gill Hamilton and Fred Saunderson

Valuing Your Collection: A practical guide for museums, libraries and archives
Freda Matassa

Call for Chapter Proposals: Deaccessioning in Special Collections and Archives

Archivists and archival institutions are now deaccessioning more than ever before. As deaccessioning has become increasingly accepted as a useful collections management tool, some still perceive it as an ethical dilemma fraught with a high risk of controversy or angering donors and researchers alike. In archives deaccessioning, archivists grapple with ethical concerns, donor relations, appraisal questions, and disposition options. Deaccessioning in Special Collections and Archives, edited by Laura Uglean Jackson and published by Rowman & Littlefield, is the first book dedicated entirely to the topic of deaccessioning in special collections and archives. It will bring together case studies, perspectives, and in-depth discussions focused solely on topics and issues related to deaccessioning in all types of archival repositories.

Contributions from authors with experience in or knowledge of special collections and archives deaccessioning are welcome. I hope to include chapters on the following topics:

  • Case studies from various institution types (e.g. small repositories, lone arrangers, community archives)
  • Perspectives and opinion pieces about reappraisal and deaccessioning
  • Reappraisal and deaccessioning outside of the United States (particularly United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand)
  • Consequences of deaccessioning, including benefits and negative effects
  • Working with donors and donor relations
  • Sale of materials and use of proceeds
  • Deaccessioning compared to weeding
  • Ethical dilemmas of deaccessioning
  • Transparency/publicizing of deaccessioning, including collections and process
  • Reappraisal and deaccessioning of digital materials
  • Standards related to reappraisal and deaccessioning
  • Reappraisal challenges
  • Disposition of deaccessioned materials including transfer, return to donor, and destruction

If you have an idea for a chapter not listed, please contact me to discuss.

Proposals of no more than 500 words should be submitted to me by February 12, 2018. Please include a biographical statement. Decisions regarding the submissions will be made by early March. First drafts will be due in May with an expected completion date in November 2018. Proposals and questions can be sent to: laura.ugleanjackson@unco.edu.

——————————
Laura Uglean Jackson
Archives and Special Collections Librarian
University of Northern Colorado
laura.ugleanjackson@unco.edu

Call for chapter proposals: Deaccessioning in Special Collections and Archives

Archivists and archival institutions are now deaccessioning more than ever before. As deaccessioning has become increasingly accepted as a useful collections management tool, some still perceive it as an ethical dilemma fraught with a high risk of controversy or angering donors and researchers alike. In archives deaccessioning, archivists grapple with ethical concerns, donor relations, appraisal questions, and disposition options. Deaccessioning in Special Collections and Archives, edited by Laura Uglean Jackson and published by Rowman & Littlefield, is the first book dedicated entirely to the topic of deaccessioning in special collections and archives. It will bring together case studies, perspectives, and in-depth discussions focused solely on topics and issues related to deaccessioning in all types of archival repositories.

Contributions from authors with experience in or knowledge of special collections and archives deaccessioning are welcome. I hope to include chapters on the following topics:

  • Case studies from various institution types (e.g. small repositories, lone arrangers, community archives)
  • Perspectives and opinion pieces about reappraisal and deaccessioning
  • Reappraisal and deaccessioning outside of the United States (particularly United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand)
  • Consequences of deaccessioning, including benefits and negative effects
  • Working with donors and donor relations
  • Sale of materials and use of proceeds
  • Deaccessioning compared to weeding
  • Ethical dilemmas of deaccessioning
  • Transparency/publicizing of deaccessioning, including collections and process
  • Reappraisal and deaccessioning of digital materials
  • Standards related to reappraisal and deaccessioning
  • Reappraisal challenges
  • Disposition of deaccessioned materials including transfer, return to donor, and destruction

If you have an idea for a chapter not listed, please contact me to discuss. Proposals of no more than 500 words should be submitted to me by February 12, 2018. Please include a biographical statement. Decisions regarding the submissions will be made by early March. First drafts will be due in May with an expected completion date in November 2018. Proposals and questions can be sent to: laura.ugleanjackson@unco.edu.