New Issue: Digital Humanities Quarterly

2018 12.2

Articles
Manuscript Study in Digital Spaces: The State of the Field and New Ways Forward
Bridget Almas, The Alpheios Project, Ltd.; Emad Khazraee, School of Information, Kent State University; Matthew Thomas Miller, Roshan Institute for Persian Studies, University of Maryland College Park; Joshua Westgard, University Libraries, University of Maryland College Park

BigDIVA and Networked Browsing: A Case for Generous Interfacing and Joyous Searching
Joel Schneier, North Carolina State University; Timothy Stinson, North Carolina State University; Matthew Davis, McMaster University

Predicting the Past
Tobias Blanke, King’s College London, Department of Digital Humanities

Reverse Engineering the First Humanities Computing Center
Steven Jones, University of South Florida

Issues in Digital Humanities
Methodological Nearness and the Question of Computational Literature
Michael Marcinkowski, Bath Spa University

Author Biographies

Call for Applicants: ARL Digital Scholarship Institute at Indiana University

As an additional note, the curriculum includes:

  • Digital Recovery: Archives & Exhibitions with Omeka
  • Multimodal Online Publishing with Scalar
  • Geospatial and Temporal Mapping
  • Information Visualization
  • Text Analysis: Concordances, Word Trends, & Word Clouds with Voyant Tools
  • Scholarly Editions: Text Encoding and Publishing with TEI
_____________________________________________________________________________________
The ARL Academy is accepting applications for the third iteration of the ARL Digital Scholarship Institute, with a deadline of Friday, May 18, 2018. The Digital Scholarship Institute is a five-day, cohort-based opportunity for professionals in ARL member librarieswho are new to digital scholarship and would like to develop their skills in an intensive, yet supportive, learner-centered environment. This iteration of the ARL Digital Scholarship Institute will take place MondayFriday, July 30–August 3, 2018, on the Indiana University campus in Bloomington and will be hosted by Indiana University Libraries.
Any ARL library professional at any stage of their career, who is looking to develop their digital scholarship skills and increase their agility in the modern research ecosystem, regardless of rank, degree, or years in the field, is eligible to apply. For more information, see the Audience Statement.
The cost of the institute is $1,500, excluding travel and accommodations.
For additional information and instructions on how to apply, visit the ARL Digital Scholarship Institute webpage. The application deadline is May 18, 2018.

Call for Chapters: Access, Control, and Dissemination in Digital Humanities

While DH is seen by some as especially interdisciplinary or more conducive to group work, linked data, and open research, including both access to results and participation in research itself, the very nature of its connectedness creates challenges for researchers who wish to assert control of data, have some role in how data is used or how work is acknowledged, and how it is attributed and recorded. Researchers involved in any substantial DH project must confront similar questions: who should be allowed to make reproductions of artifacts, which ones, how many, how often, of what quality and at what cost, what are the rights of possession and reproduction, including access, copyright, intellectual property rights or digital rights management. Given the potential of open and accessible data, it is sometimes suggested that DH might be a much-needed bridge between ivory tower institutions and the general public. The promise of DH in this regard, however, still remains in many ways unfulfilled, raising the question of who DH is for, if not solely for bodies of like-minded academics.

Contributors to this volume have varied experiences with applications for digital technology in the classroom, in museums and archives, and with the general public and they present answers to these problems from a variety of perspectives. Digital Humanities is not a homogeneous enterprise, and we find that DH functions differently in different fields across the humanities and is put to different ends with varying results. As a result, one may already (fore)see DH moving in distinct directions in individual academic fields, but whether this splintering will have a positive effect or is an indication that disciplines are retreating to their respective silos, remains to be seen. We need to understand better how such differences are communicated among various fields, and how those results are adopted, not to mention evaluated, and by whom. This volume addresses these issues with concrete examples from researchers in the field.

The editors have been working with Routledge to prepare a proposal for publication. Successful submissions will be included in a proposed volume based on a workshop held at Carleton University in May, 2016 (http://dhworkshop.ca/).

Editors:
Dr. Richard Mann, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario
Richard.Mann at carleton.ca

Dr. Shane Hawkins, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario
shane_hawkins at carleton.ca

Proposals Submission Deadline: 01 May 2018
Notification of Acceptance: 31 May 2018
Submission Date: 30 November 2018

Submission Procedure

You are invited to submit a word document with title of the proposal and abstract (500-800 words) and a CV. All proposals should be submitted to the following address: shane_hawkins at carleton.ca

Deadline is 01 May 2018.

Authors will be notified of a final decision by 31 May 2018 and asked to send a full text by 30 November 2018. The chapter’s length will be 5000-7000 words. Submitted chapters should not have been previously published or sent to another editor.

Digital Humanities Reading List

Though this list is mostly for libraries and scholarly communication, archives intersects at points.

LIBER’s Digital Humanities & Digital Cultural Heritage Working Group is gathering literature for libraries with an interest in digital humanities. Four teams, each with a specific focus, have assembled a list of must-read papers, articles and reports.

Digital Humanities Reading List Part 1

Digital Humanities Reading List Part 2

Digital Humanities Reading List Part 3

(part 4 coming soon)

CFP: VIEW Special Issue “Audiovisual Data in Digital Humanities”

Considering the relevance of audiovisual material as perhaps the biggest wave of data to come in the near future (Smith, 2013, IBM prospective study) its relatively modest position within the realm of Digital Humanities conferences is remarkable. The objective of this special issue for VIEW is to present current research in that field on a variety of epistemological, historiographical and technological issues that are specific for digital methods applied to audiovisual data. We strive to cover a great range of media and data types and of applications representing the various stages of the research process.

The following key topics / problems / questions are of special interest:

  1. Do computational approaches to sound and (moving) images extend or/and change our conceptual and epistemological understanding of these media? What are the leading machine learning approaches to the study of audio and visual culture and particularly time-based media? How do these approaches, models, and methods of learning relate to acquiring and producing knowledge by the conventional means of reading and analyzing text? Do we understand the 20th century differently through listening to sounds and voices and viewing images than through reading texts? How does massive digitization and online access relate to the concept of authenticity and provenance?
  2. What tools in the sequence of the research process – search, annotation, vocabulary, analysis, presentation – are best suited to work with audio-visual data? The ways in which we structure and process information are primarily determined by the convention of attributing meaning to visual content through text. Does searching audio-visual archives, annotating photos or film clips, analyzing a corpus of city sounds, or presenting research output through a virtual exhibition, require special dedicated tools? What is the diversity in requirements within the communities of humanities scholars? How can, for example, existing commercial tools or software be repurposed for scholarly use?
  3. What are the main hurdles for the further expansion of AV in DH? Compared to text, audiovisual data as carriers of knowledge are a relatively young phenomenon. Consequently the question of ‘ownership’ and the commercial value of many audiovisual sources result in considerable constraints for use due to issues of copyright. A constraint of a completely different order, is the intensive investment in time needed when listening to or watching an audiovisual corpus, compared to reading a text. Does the law or do technologies for speech and image retrieval offer solutions to overcome these obstacles?

Practicals
Contributions are encouraged from authors with different kinds of expertise and interests in media studies, digital humanities, television and media history.
Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on October 2nd , 2017.
Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata.
A notice of acceptance will be sent to authors in the 1st week of November 2017.
Articles (3 – 6,000 words) will be due on 15 th of February 2018. Longer articles are welcome, given that they comply with the journal’s author guidelines.
For further information or questions about the issue, please contact the co-editors: Mark Williams (Associate Professor Film and Media Studies, Dartmouth College U.S.), Pelle Snickars (Prof. of Media Studies Umea Univesity, Sweden) or Andreas Fickers (Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History).

About VIEW Journal
See http://www.viewjournal.eu/ for the current and back issues. VIEW is supported by the EUscreen Network and published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, Royal Holloway University of London, and University of Luxembourg. VIEW is proud to be an open access journal. All articles are indexed through the Directory of Open Access Journals, the EBSCO Film and Television Index, Paperity and NARCIS.

CFP: Digital Humanities – The Shifting Contexts

Although this call does not specifically mention archives, it might be of interest for those who work with digital humanities projects.

This special edition of Digital Library Perspectives focuses on the topic of Digital Humanities, with emphasis on the shifting framework of scholars and practitioners who do not necessarily identify themselves digital humanists but use Digital Humanities tools and practices in their work. The Guest Editors of this issue include Dr. Megan Meredith-Lobay (University of British Columbia) and Allan Cho (University of British Columbia).
The co-editors invite contributions on the following, as well as other related topics:

  • Role of LIS in supporting non-traditional DH areas of scholarship, i.e. New Media  Studies, Musicology, Archaeology, non-textual DH
  • Emerging areas of research, teaching, learning in the digital scholarship in the social sciences and humanities
  • Beyond “What is DH?” – exploring “Why DH?”
  • Non-traditional DH practice and practitioners: inclusion and exclusion
  • DH in non-western contexts
  • The intersections between DH and digital social science
  • Digital Humanities as Data Science

Important Dates:
Deadline for submission: December 2017
Notification of acceptance: April 2018
Deadline for final paper submission: June 2018

Submission Instructions:
Papers should be no more than 6000 words
Submissions to Digital Library Perspectives are made using ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer review system. Registration for an account needs to be created first: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/dlp

NEH and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Announce Fellowships for Digital Publication

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is proud to join the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in announcing the recipients of the first round of NEH-Mellon Fellowships for Digital Publication. The new special opportunity within NEH’s fellowship program is intended to stimulate the emerging field of digital publication.

Read the full press release.

Some of the projects have an archival foundation or components. See the full list of awarded projects.