CFP: Chesapeake DH Consortium

The Chesapeake Digital Humanities Consortium Steering Committee is excited to announce that the #CDHC2021 Call for Proposals is now open! Our theme for 2021 is Social Justice and Online Activism. This event will be all-virtual over two half-day sessions on February 25th and 26th, 2021. All events will be free of charge.

We encourage participation from the broader digital humanities communities, including undergraduate and graduate students, college and university faculty, independent scholars, community members, librarians, archivists, and technologists. Within the larger theme of Social Justice and Online Activism, we encourage submissions within the following areas:

-COVID-19
-Race and Racial Inequities
-Social Media and Mobilization
-Automating Inequality (cf. Automating Inequality; e.g. flaws of fraud detection, decision-support software vis-a-vis inequality)
-Algorithmic Bias (cf. Algorithms of Oppression)
-Bias in AI and Machine Learning
-Digital Archives Power (cf. Archives Power)
-Cybertypes (cf. Nakamura’s Cybertypes)
-Crowdsourcing DH projects
-Hashtag activism
-Inclusive DH pedagogy
-DH for social good

You may submit your proposals directly here: https://forms.gle/yo8ACeTgb93pX1gy5

Proposals are due November 31st at 11:59 pm ET.

For more information on topics, proposal types, and conference details, see our website at https://chesapeakedh.github.io/conference-2021

If you have questions or comments please don’t hesitate to reach out to us at chesapeakedhconsortium@gmail.com.

Please share widely. We look forward to your proposals!

Best,
CDHC Steering and Program Committee

**
Sherri Brown
Research Librarian for English
University of Virginia Library | Kerchof 102
slb4kt@virginia.edu | 919.434.7801

CFP: International Conference on Digital Humanities: “Digital Dialogues”

Type: Conference

Date: October 24, 2020 to October 25, 2020

Location: United Kingdom

Subject Fields: Digital Humanities, Humanities, Research and Methodology, Social Sciences, Race Studies

With the epidemic shaking the world and the research/teaching/learning being moved online, the field of Digital Humanities has received unprecedented attention of scholars and professionals. It has become vital to explore its theories, methods and practices and to clarify its multiple possibilities and challenges.

This conference will look at the interaction of humanities and digital technologies and the use of humanities-related digital resources in various fields. It will analyse the ways digital humanities transformed and keep transforming academic environment, local communities and global conversations and the innovative ways of sharing knowledge and teaching it introduced.

We invite proposals from various disciplines including IT, media and communication, design, history, political sciences, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, literature, linguistics, psychology, etc.

Papers are invited on topics related, but not limited, to:

  • practising digital humanities
  • teaching digital humanities
  • digital collections, data and research processes
  • digital humanities across class, race and gender
  • digital humanities as activism and artistic practice
  • digital humanities and cyberculture

Paper proposals up to 250 words and a brief biographical note should be sent by 10 August 2020 to digital.humanities@lcir.co.uk.

The Paper Proposal form could be downloaded from http://digital.humanities.lcir.co.uk/

Registration fee – 90 GBP

The conference will be held online. Papers presented at the conference will be published in a post-conference volume with an ISBN number.

Contact Info:

Dr Olena Lytovka, digital.humanities@lcir.co.uk
Contact Email: digital.humanities@lcir.co.uk
URL: http://digital.humanities.lcir.co.uk/

 

New Journal: Reviews in Digital Humanities

Welcome to Reviews in Digital Humanities

Reviews in Digital Humanities, edited by Dr. Jennifer Guiliano and Dr. Roopika Risam, is the pilot of a peer-reviewed journal and project registry that facilitates scholarly evaluation and dissemination of digital humanities work and its outputs. We accept submissions of projects that blend humanistic and technical inquiry in a broad range of methods, disciplines, scopes, and scales. These include but are not limited to: digital archives, multimedia or multimodal scholarship, digital exhibits, visualizations, digital games, and digital tools. We particularly encourage submission of digital scholarship in critical ethnic, African diaspora, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian American, and postcolonial studies. Submit your work or contact the editors at reviewsindigitalhumanities@gmail.com.

New Journal: Unbound: A Journal of Digital Scholarship

from the Digital Humanities Discussion Group (ALA):

Hello, Everyone:

I’m excited this morning to announce the launch of Unbound: A Journal of Digital ScholarshipUnbound publishes work that explores the interstices of digital scholarship, broadly conceived, with an emphasis on digital cultural studies; critical digital humanities; galleries, libraries, archives, and museums; the interpretive social sciences; and socially engaged computational or quantitative methods. This open access journal publishes editorials, essays, reviews, pedagogy and praxis notes (short form works on research in progress, single-institution case studies, and pedagogy), and new media art, music, and performance portfolios. We welcome submissions from scholars and professionals at all stages of professional development in all fields.

In addition to publishing original scholarship, Unbound is the venue for the proceedings of the Digital Frontiers conference, and related satellite events. The first issue features essays and abstracts from Realizing Resistance: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Star Wars, Episodes VII, VIII & IX, which took place May 2-4, 2019 at the University of North Texas.

I am joined on the Editorial Board by John Edward Martin (UNT), Leigh Bonds (Ohio State), Jenn Stayton (UNT), Kevin Jenkins (Penn State), Adetty Pérez de Miles (Texas State), Joshua Jackson (North Carolina State), and Brea Henson (UNT). The journal is published by Digital Frontiers and hosted by the University of North Texas Libraries.
The Call for Contributions is now open, and guidelines are also available for proposing special issues.

Please join me in celebrating this event, and please share the Call for Contributions generously.

With Warm Regards,
Spencer D. C. Keralis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Digital Humanities Librarian
Liaison: Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities
University of Illinois Urbana Champaign
spencerk@illinois.edu
Pronouns: he/they
ORCID: 0000-0003-0903-5587

CFP: Exploring Literacies Through Digital Humanities (dh+lib special issue) @DHandLib

CFP: Exploring Literacies Through Digital Humanities

This past year an informal group of librarians began meeting to discuss the intricate relationships between digital humanities (DH) and literacies—information literacy, visual literacy, digital literacy, data literacy, and the like—with the intention of fostering a larger conversation around the topic and learn more about what’s actually happening “on the ground.” The group was motivated by the desire to help librarians striving to incorporate digital pedagogy into their teaching and those seeking to engage more critically with digital forms of scholarship. To contribute to this conversation, this dh+lib special issue is seeking submissions that explore DH work, be it research, digital project creation and evaluation, or digital pedagogy, through the lens of literacies.

Call: https://acrl.ala.org/dh/2019/09/04/cfp-exploring-literacies-through-digital-humanities/

The aim of this special issue is to provide readers from all areas of librarianship with greater insight into the intersection of DH and literacies, therefore, please keep the audience in mind and make choices such as defining DH-specific terms or linking out to resources that provide further explanation of DH methods and concepts.

New voices and submissions from graduate students, junior scholars, instructional technologists, and others who work on the frontlines of DH and literacy work are encouraged. Perspectives from outside of the U.S. are particularly welcome. Submissions may take the form of short essays (between 750 and 1500 words long) or responses in other media that are of comparable length. Possible topics include:

  • How can digital humanities tools/methods inform teaching information literacy concepts? Or vice versa?
  • How do aspects of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy, such as the constructed and contextual nature of authority, fit in with digital humanities work? How do digital humanities methods and scholarship create challenges for the ACRL Framework?
  • How might the ACRL Framework (or other frameworks and literacies) serve as a basis for evaluating digital humanities scholarship?
  • What are the threshold concepts for digital humanities?
  • How might our professional literacies inform our collection practices, especially around collections as data?
  • How might DH literacies inform other areas of professional practice?
  • Conduct an analysis of a digital humanities project that explores the literacies and competencies necessary for its creation.
  • Discuss criticisms of literacies as a concept or issues with applying a literacy framework to DH work.

Please send your proposals in the form of a 250-word abstract and a brief biographical statement for each author to the editors at dhandlib.acrl@gmail.com using the subject line: 2019 Special Issue. Proposals are due by October 30, 2019.

Copyright notice: Material published on dh+lib will be covered by the CC BY-4.0 International license unless otherwise arranged with the Editors-in-Chief.

CFP: Debates in Digital Humanities Pedagogy

This call does not specifically mention archives, but there is one suggested topic discussing student work, such as digitization and OCR correction, that is related. Also, that same suggestion asks about labor and what should and should not be compensated. This is an opportunity for those who work in academic libraries and are involved with digital humanities to give voice to the role of archives.

_________________________

Brian Croxall and Diane Jakacki, Editors

Deadline for 500-Word Abstracts: April 1, 2019

Part of the Debates in the Digital Humanities Series
A book series from the University of Minnesota Press
Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein, Series Editors

Over the last decade, Digital Humanities (DH) has reinvigorated discussions of pedagogy in the academy. Unconferences on DH pedagogy and blogs about teaching with digital methods in the humanities classroom have led to extensive discussions about approaches to teaching at annual disciplinary conferences. At the same time, conversations and debates about teaching digital humanities—whether to undergraduates, graduate students, or to the faculty themselves—have led to more and more people becoming involved in the field, each of them coming from different subjects bringing their own perspectives and praxes with them to the teaching of DH. We have arrived at a moment when institutions are formally integrating DH into the curriculum and granting degrees; we are creating minors, majors, and even graduate certificates in DH; all of this while many of us are still new to the experience of (teaching) DH. This calls for another round of discussion of DH pedagogy or a discussion of pedagogy in a new key.

These students—and the ways in which we teach them—are a very real expression of what each of us as instructors believes digital humanities to be. As our students and our colleagues continue to ask us “What is digital humanities?” we have the opportunity to answer their questions in terms of how we teach digital humanities.

We seek authors who can develop critical arguments around such topics and questions as the following:

  • What should a DH curriculum look like? Where should those courses have their departmental homes? And how do those home departments affect both the praxis of the instructor and the course outcomes? How much DH does a course need in order for it to “count” as DH?
  • What is the impetus for the recent growth and interest in creating DH majors, minors, and graduate certificates? How does the evolution of a formalized curriculum mirror or compare to the creation of programs like Women’s, Gender, or Media Studies?
  • How has DH pedagogy changed in the last 10 years? How has it ossified over that same decade? In what ways does the specter of the literature classroom continue to “haunt” or “possess” DH pedagogy?
  • To what degree has the “lab” model of DH pedagogy drawn from traditions of STEM pedagogy? To what degree is it a descendant (in the Darwinian sense) from the Humanities seminar with its tradition of Socratic dialogue?
  • Who teaches—or gets to teach—DH? To what degree do universities continue to depend on post-docs, alt-acs, or other people in precarious labor positions to do the work of DH instruction, including designing that curriculum?
  • How does the frequent alignment of DH with the library on university campuses affect those who are learning DH and those who are doing the teaching?
  • What forms of invisible labor exist in the DH pedagogy, including the ubiquitous guest speaker via Skype, the sharing of syllabi and assignments, or the asking of help from those who have built tools? To what degree should/must pedagogies be similarly open? What would a “proprietary” DH pedagogy look like and could it truly be “DH”?
  • How does the ongoing investment of external grant-funding agencies impact the ways in which DH pedagogy evolves at an institution? Who on campus is being supported to ‘learn’ DH in order to teach it?
  • What should we make of the trend in DH training towards informal learning experiences—workshops, training institutes, THATCamps—over more formalized coursework, especially at the graduate level? To what degree are these informal training opportunities deployed by various institutions as opportunities for income generation from a population of students who may feel compelled to learn about a growth area within the academy?
  • How do questions of access and accessibility affect the student (and instructor) experience? Does DH pedagogy require kinds of digital privilege?
  • What are the ethics of asking students to do project work—digitization, OCR correction, etc.—within the bounds of a classroom? What labor can be considered educational and what labor should be compensated?
  • What are the outcomes of DH education? Do we have longitudinal data of the students who have gone through formal curricular programs? Are we teaching our humanities students new ways to close-read and critique, or are we providing them with marketable skills?
  • What do students think about their DH training? What perspectives do they have to share with those who are doing the teaching and/or making the broader curricular decisions?

While we expect that the essays in this volume will draw on the practical experiences of its contributors, it is decidedly not a series of assignment or course case studies. Looking to the title of the series, we place an emphasis on the “Debates” and look forward to abstracts that make arguments about the pedagogies of DH.

Tentative Deadlines

  • Abstracts due: April 1, 2019
  • Decisions on accepted proposals: May 1, 2019
  • Proposal to press: June 1, 2019
  • Essay Submission Deadline: October 1, 2019
  • Peer-to-Peer Review: October 2019
  • Revisions Due: January 1, 2020

Please contact the editors with any questions:
Brian Croxall, Brigham Young University (brian.croxall@byu.edu)
Diane Jakacki, Bucknell University (dkj004@bucknell.edu)

Editorial Opportunities

dh+lib is looking for four new editors to join our editorial team:

Technical Editor
The Technical Editor will be responsible for maintaining the dh+lib website (which currently runs on WordPress and is hosted by ACRL) and working with ACRL to manage any problems that might arise. The person in this position would also take the lead assessing the current platform to ensure that it best meets our needs. Candidates should be able to commit 3-5 hours/week; have experience working with WordPress and WordPress plugins, ideally with PressForward; and have a strong interest in digital publishing.

Outreach Editor
The Outreach Editor will be responsible for maintaining relationships with professional organizations related to the mission of dh+lib, including the ACRL Digital Scholarship Section and the Association of Digital Humanities Organizations, and initiating new relationships that can help dh+lib reach out to new communities and help us grow. This editor would also have the opportunity to manage the dh+lib  Twitter account. Candidates should be able to commit 3-5 hours/week; be a member of an organization related to the mission of dh+lib (such as ACRL or ADHO); and have a strong interest in digital publishing.

As both of the above editorial positions are new, the people in these positions would help define their roles. Additionally, all members of the editorial team help with article submissions and would be involved with other content decisions.

Review Editor (2 positions)
Review editors take an active role in shaping the content that appears in the dh+lib Review, as well as contributing to strategic discussions about our workflows and future directions for the publication. Responsibilities of this role include working on rotation to either manage the week’s production effort (selecting items from nominated content, authoring/publishing posts) or provide editorial support suggestions on another editor’s week. Due to our editorial calendar, most of this activity takes place on Wednesday evenings/Thursday mornings, and Review editors often collaborate informally and have infrequent editorial meetings throughout each semester.

Each editorial appointment will be for a term of two years with options for renewal.

Candidates should submit a letter expressing their interest and their qualifications to dhandlib.acrl@gmail.com by November 7 for consideration.

New Issue: Digital Humanities Quarterly

2018 12.2

Articles
Manuscript Study in Digital Spaces: The State of the Field and New Ways Forward
Bridget Almas, The Alpheios Project, Ltd.; Emad Khazraee, School of Information, Kent State University; Matthew Thomas Miller, Roshan Institute for Persian Studies, University of Maryland College Park; Joshua Westgard, University Libraries, University of Maryland College Park

BigDIVA and Networked Browsing: A Case for Generous Interfacing and Joyous Searching
Joel Schneier, North Carolina State University; Timothy Stinson, North Carolina State University; Matthew Davis, McMaster University

Predicting the Past
Tobias Blanke, King’s College London, Department of Digital Humanities

Reverse Engineering the First Humanities Computing Center
Steven Jones, University of South Florida

Issues in Digital Humanities
Methodological Nearness and the Question of Computational Literature
Michael Marcinkowski, Bath Spa University

Author Biographies

Call for Applicants: ARL Digital Scholarship Institute at Indiana University

As an additional note, the curriculum includes:

  • Digital Recovery: Archives & Exhibitions with Omeka
  • Multimodal Online Publishing with Scalar
  • Geospatial and Temporal Mapping
  • Information Visualization
  • Text Analysis: Concordances, Word Trends, & Word Clouds with Voyant Tools
  • Scholarly Editions: Text Encoding and Publishing with TEI
_____________________________________________________________________________________
The ARL Academy is accepting applications for the third iteration of the ARL Digital Scholarship Institute, with a deadline of Friday, May 18, 2018. The Digital Scholarship Institute is a five-day, cohort-based opportunity for professionals in ARL member librarieswho are new to digital scholarship and would like to develop their skills in an intensive, yet supportive, learner-centered environment. This iteration of the ARL Digital Scholarship Institute will take place MondayFriday, July 30–August 3, 2018, on the Indiana University campus in Bloomington and will be hosted by Indiana University Libraries.
Any ARL library professional at any stage of their career, who is looking to develop their digital scholarship skills and increase their agility in the modern research ecosystem, regardless of rank, degree, or years in the field, is eligible to apply. For more information, see the Audience Statement.
The cost of the institute is $1,500, excluding travel and accommodations.
For additional information and instructions on how to apply, visit the ARL Digital Scholarship Institute webpage. The application deadline is May 18, 2018.

Call for Chapters: Access, Control, and Dissemination in Digital Humanities

While DH is seen by some as especially interdisciplinary or more conducive to group work, linked data, and open research, including both access to results and participation in research itself, the very nature of its connectedness creates challenges for researchers who wish to assert control of data, have some role in how data is used or how work is acknowledged, and how it is attributed and recorded. Researchers involved in any substantial DH project must confront similar questions: who should be allowed to make reproductions of artifacts, which ones, how many, how often, of what quality and at what cost, what are the rights of possession and reproduction, including access, copyright, intellectual property rights or digital rights management. Given the potential of open and accessible data, it is sometimes suggested that DH might be a much-needed bridge between ivory tower institutions and the general public. The promise of DH in this regard, however, still remains in many ways unfulfilled, raising the question of who DH is for, if not solely for bodies of like-minded academics.

Contributors to this volume have varied experiences with applications for digital technology in the classroom, in museums and archives, and with the general public and they present answers to these problems from a variety of perspectives. Digital Humanities is not a homogeneous enterprise, and we find that DH functions differently in different fields across the humanities and is put to different ends with varying results. As a result, one may already (fore)see DH moving in distinct directions in individual academic fields, but whether this splintering will have a positive effect or is an indication that disciplines are retreating to their respective silos, remains to be seen. We need to understand better how such differences are communicated among various fields, and how those results are adopted, not to mention evaluated, and by whom. This volume addresses these issues with concrete examples from researchers in the field.

The editors have been working with Routledge to prepare a proposal for publication. Successful submissions will be included in a proposed volume based on a workshop held at Carleton University in May, 2016 (http://dhworkshop.ca/).

Editors:
Dr. Richard Mann, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario
Richard.Mann at carleton.ca

Dr. Shane Hawkins, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario
shane_hawkins at carleton.ca

Proposals Submission Deadline: 01 May 2018
Notification of Acceptance: 31 May 2018
Submission Date: 30 November 2018

Submission Procedure

You are invited to submit a word document with title of the proposal and abstract (500-800 words) and a CV. All proposals should be submitted to the following address: shane_hawkins at carleton.ca

Deadline is 01 May 2018.

Authors will be notified of a final decision by 31 May 2018 and asked to send a full text by 30 November 2018. The chapter’s length will be 5000-7000 words. Submitted chapters should not have been previously published or sent to another editor.