Call for Applications: Awards for Excellence in Writing and Publishing

The Society of American Archivists is soliciting recommendations for writing and publishing awards for excellence. There are five awards up for grabs with varying prize amounts. All submissions must have been produced during 2022.

Note that you can apply or be nominated for multiple awards in a single cycle, but may only receive one. The deadline for nominations is February 28, 2023.

Call for Nominations: Philip M. Hamer and Elizabeth Hamer Kegan Award

The Philip M. Hamer and Elizabeth Hamer Kegan Award Committee invites nominations for the 2023 award.

The Philip M. Hamer and Elizabeth Hamer Kegan Award recognizes an archivist, editor, group of individuals, or institution that has increased public awareness of a specific body of documents (which can be a specific archival collection or thematic aggregation) through compilation, transcription, exhibition, or public presentation of archives or manuscript materials for educational, instructional, or other public purpose. Work that has had an impact on a local, regional, national, and/or international level is welcomed.

Recent winners include:

  • 2022: San Diego Air and Space Museum
  • 2021: California State University Japanese American Digitization Project
  • 2020: Laura Wagner, Rubenstein Library, Duke University (Radio Haiti)
  • 2019:  Dickinson College Archives and Special Collections for Carlisle Indian School Digital Resource Center

Eligibility:

Individual archivists and editors, groups of individuals, organizations. This award is open to nominees within and outside of the United States, and is not limited to SAA members.

Prize:

A certificate and a cash prize of $500.

Application Deadline:

All nominations shall be submitted to SAA by February 28, 2023. 

For more information on this award, including the nomination form, please go to http://www2.archivists.org/governance/handbook/section12-hamer

For more information on SAA awards and the nominations process, please go to https://www2.archivists.org/aboutsaa/awardsandscholarships

New Issue: American Archivist

In the digital-only issue of American Archivist 85.2, two international perspectives share steps taken toward disaster preparedness in Germany’s cultural archives, and lessons learned from a data recovery project at the National Archives of Australia; Heather Soyka discusses the effectiveness of the Archives Leadership Institute’s career building opportunities; and Alston Brake Cobourn, Jen Corrinne Brown, Edward Warga, and Lisa Louis show how metaliteracy and transliteracy projects are doable at underserved institutions.

Other articles examine the current state of archival education, user experience and reference staffing in archives, and the personal archiving habits of modern soldiers. In addition, contributors review several books that consider social and cultural movements and the fate of historical archives.

On the cover: German archivists participate in a training course on disaster and emergency response at the Augsburg City Archive in 2016. Guided by a conservator, small groups practiced the handling, packaging, and transport of damaged materials. In his article, “’Together We Are Strong’: Emergency Associations for the Protection of Germany’s Cultural Heritage,” Rainer Jedlitschka discusses the creation and development of several emergency associations in Germany that have collaborated to offer mutual support in the event of natural and humanmade disasters. Read more about the role and success of the new networks and German archivists’ new experience and preparedness. Photo courtesy of Kerstin Lengger, Augsburg City Archive.

American Archivist 85.2 (Fall/Winter 2022)
Table of Contents

(Review access here)

From the Editor

Articles

Reviews

Love what you’ve read? Share it with a friend or colleague! 

Interested in writing an article or review? Check out American Archivist’s submission guidelines.

Participate in a research study about the impact of chronic illness and disability on careers in special collections libraries and archives

Special Collections librarians and archivists are invited to participate in a research study about the impact that having a chronic illness and/or disability has on their careers. To participate, you must be 18 years or older, a current employee at a special collections library or archive, and self-identify as having a chronic illness and/or disability.

This study consists of an online survey and is being conducted by Melanie Griffin, Director of Special Collections Services at the University of Arkansas Libraries (melanieg@uark.edu).  The survey will ask questions about your current employment status as well as questions related to your experiences working with chronic illness and/or disability while working in a special collections library or archives. It should take 10-15 minutes to complete the survey.

If you decide to participate, understand that participation is voluntary and can be discontinued at any point without penalty. You can choose not to participate. There is no cost associated with participating in this study, and you will not receive compensation for participating. At the conclusion of the study, you have the right to request feedback about the results by contacting the researcher.

All information will be kept confidential to the extent allowed by applicable State and Federal law. Data will be anonymized before analysis, and results will only be presented in the aggregate. Records will be stored on secure university servers.

If you have questions about the study, please contact Melanie Griffin, Director of Special Collections Services at the University of Arkansas Libraries, by emailing melanieg@uark.edu.

The deadline to complete the survey is March 1, 2023.

Access the survey: https://uark.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3sZ99mGKviYwK58.

Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,

Melanie Griffin
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Melanie Griffin
Director of Special Collections Services
University of Arkansas Libraries
Fayetteville AR
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Seeking Presenters for Digital Records & Collection Management Webinar

The Collection Management Section will be hosting a webinar this spring on the theme of digital records and collection management, and we are actively seeking presenters!

Do you have clever workflows for managing electronic (or hybrid) records and collections? What information are you tracking, and what tools are you using? What are some of the challenges or hurdles that you’ve encountered in implementing a system for managing electronic records? How do you distinguish between born-digital and digitized records (or do you)? How do you distinguish between donor-digitized materials and originals in a collection management system? If any of this sounds like something you are excited to present about, we would love to hear from you!

We are looking for speakers to share their experience in a 10-15 minute virtual presentation planned tentatively for March or April, date TBD based on presenters’ availability. We would love to have diverse presenters and institutions represented: speakers from small institutions, HBCUs, and community archives are encouraged to apply. 

If you’re interested in presenting, please send a brief proposal to Rita Johnston at ritajohnston@miami.edu by January 31st. Please feel free to email with any questions!

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Jane Gorjevsky
Head of Collections Management
Columbia University Rare Book and Manuscript Library
jg2138@columbia.edu

SAA Research Forum Recordings Available

The recordings of the Research Forum sessions are now online here: https://www.pathlms.com/saa/events/1994/event_sections/11947

People who registered for the conference have immediate access to the recordings.

For people who were not registered, the all-access recordings package is available to purchase through the conference registration page: https://www2.archivists.org/am2020/attend/Conference-Registration

Many thanks to the presenters and attendees for making the first virtual Research Forum a success!

Kate Neptune and Rebecca Thayer
Research Forum (RF) Coordinators, on behalf of the RF Program Committee

Call for Reviews – The American Archivist Reviews Portal

Are you interested in new technologies and digital projects and want to explore their use for archives and archivists? Are you interested in reviewing the latest archives resources and technologies for your colleagues? The American Archivist Reviews Portal seeks reviews of digital collections, exhibits, as well as software, platforms, and other technologies that archivists both create and use everyday. We encourage authors from communities traditionally underrepresented in publishing.

Reviews of software, websites, or digital tools and resources should be 600 to 850 words. Microreviews of monographs, journal articles, blogs or apps should be 100 to 200 words. Guidelines for writing reviews are available on the Reviews Portal.  Reviewers can suggest a resource or work with the reviews portal coordinator to choose a resource from our list of review ideas. Our editors are available to help new and seasoned writers throughout the entire review process.

Here are a few resources that we would love to publish and share reviews about:

  • Chicana Por Mi Raza
  • Civil Rights in Mississippi Digital Archive
  • “Do Better” – Love(,) Us: Guidelines for Developing and Supporting Grant-Funded Positions in Digital Libraries, Archives, and Museums
  • ePADD
  • News Provenance Project (proof-of-concept)
  • Permanent.org
  • The Programming Historian
  • Women Writers Online

We are also interested in reviews that assess machine learning, natural language processing, and other data science technologies for archives.

If you are interested in writing a review, have a resource you’d like to suggest for review, or have any questions, please contact us: https://reviews.americanarchivist.org/contact/

Archives in Context: Season 4

The Society of American Archivists (SAA) is delighted to present Season 4 of Archives in Context, a podcast highlighting archival literature and technologies, and most importantly, the people behind them. Cosponsored by SAA’s Publications Board, American Archivist Editorial Board, and Committee on Public Awareness, the podcast explores the often moving and important work of memory-keeping.

In Season 4, released August 2020, hosts Chris Burns, Ashley Levine, Nicole Milano, and Anna Trammell interview authors, editors, and educators who have developed new tools and resources for implementing archival practices that are ethical, accessible, and inclusive and who are expanding the conversation on leadership, preservation, and community. Listen to interviews with

  • Lae’l Hughes-Watkins and Tamar Chute on the influential Project STAND (Student Activism Now Documented);
  • Lydia Tang on her collaborative work to revise the Guidelines for Accessible Archives for People with Disabilities;
  • Ashley Farmer on her viral essay “Archiving While Black;”
  • Trevor Owens on his award-winning book The Theory and Craft of Digital Preservation;
  • Liza Posas on the workbook she is developing for the Protocols for Native American Archival Materials;
  • Jennifer Johnson on her contribution to Leading and Managing Archives and Manuscripts Programs, volume 1 in SAA’s Archival Fundamentals Series III; and
  • Courtney Dean and Grace Danico on Acid Free, the online magazine of the Los Angeles Archivists Collective.

Production coordinated by Bethany Anderson and Colleen McFarland Rademaker. Listen to the full season now via the Archives in Context websiteGoogle PlaySpotify, and iTunes.

2019 SAA Research Forum Proceedings Now Online

2019 SAA Research Forum

9:00-9:30 AM: Opening and Session 1

Welcome and Overview – Research Forum Program Committee  [Slides]

Dispatches from the Front: Findings from the Virtual Footlocker Project Phase 1 – Edward Benoit, III and Roxanne Guidry [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

9:30-10:00 AM: Session 2: Archives and Education

Developing a Framework to Enable Collaboration in Computational Archival Science Education – Richard Marciano [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Gauging Student Perspectives: Using Survey Data to Understand Student Perceptions of Archives – Suzanne Noruschat and Giao Luong Baker [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

Supporting and Sustaining Digital Curation Education with BitCuratorEdu – Jessica Farrell and Christopher Lee [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

10:00-10:30 AM: Break

10:30-11:00 AM: Session 3: Archives in Practice

“No ideal place for [special collections and archives]:” Administrator and user viewpoints on archives existing in libraries – Ashley Todd-Diaz [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Sorry, this Video Does Not Exist: Curating the Digital Documentary – Heather Barnes [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Conscious editing of archival description at UNC-Chapel Hill – Jackie Dean [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

11:00-11:30 AM: Session 4: Lightning Talks

Using CIRCA for Special Collections: A Scalable Solution – Gwynn Thayer and Eli Brown [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

What’s In the Box? Collection Exploration and Instruction – Nathalie Proulx and Kristen Korfitzen [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

Expedited digital appraisal for regular archivists:  an MPLP type approach for hybrid collections – Susanne Belovari [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Radical Collaboration between Computer Science and Archival Science to Educate Next Generation Archivists – Jane Zhang [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

11:30 AM-Noon: Session 5: Radical Collaboration [Abstract/Bios]

Overview and an Archivist’s Example – Nance McGovern [Slides]

Example: Working with Data and Archives – Heather Soyka [Remarks]

Example: The Evolving Role of University Archivists – Kari Smith [Slides]

Noon-1:30 PM: Lunch

1:30-2:00 PM: Session 6: Scaling Practice

Digitization for Everybody (Dig4E): Bridging the Gap between Standards and Practice – Paul Conway [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

By the People, with the people: User-center crowdsourcing at the Library of Congress – Lauren Algee [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Scalability and process: A national survey of inventory practices within archives – Patrice-Andre Prud’homme and JJ Compton [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

2:00-3:00 PM: Poster Session (see list of posters)

3:00-3:30 PM: Break [and extra time for posters]

3:30-4:00 PM: Session 7: Digital Practice

Centralized Born-Digital Processing at Wilson Special Collections Library – Jessica Venlet [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Social Media Data Preservation in an API-driven World – Amelia Acker [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Computer-Assisted Appraisal of Email: RATOM – Christopher Lee [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

4:00-4:30 PM: Session 8: SAA’s CORDA

Framing Research as Evaluation and Assessment: Introducing CORDA – Paul Conway and Jennifer Gunter King [Abstract/Bios] [Slides]

4:30-5:00 PM: Session 9 and Closing 

At a Crossroads: Archival Description, Aggregation, and the Next 20 Years – Jodi Allison-Bunnell [Abstract/Bio] [Slides]

Closing: Looking Ahead – Research Forum Program Committee  [Slides]

Posters (in alphabetical order)

A Collaborative Effort to Plan a Digital Preservation Program at a Small Library – Laura Bell and Fatemeh Rezaei [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

 American Samoa’s Government Archives – James Himphill [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Appraising Professional Networks – Cory Nimer [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Are Academic Archives Championing EDI Initiatives in Digital Collections Metadata Practices? – Jessica Serrao [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Campus Archives in the Shadow of Campus Sexual Assault – Ana Roeschley and Jessica Holden [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Creating Competencies for Audiovisual Archiving Education and Professional Development – Karen Gracy [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Electronic Health Records and Electronic Health Archives: An Archival Examination of the ISO Health Informatics Standards – He Yang and Xuenan Zhang [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Empowering the Archivist: Progress Report on “Applying Intelligent Agents to Digital Preservation Research Programme” – Paul Severn [Abstract/Bio] [Poster forthcoming]

Exhibits of Archives in Japan – Yayoi Tsutsui [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

How do levels of description affect discoverability of the Web Archives at the Library of Congress? – Carlyn Osborn [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Integrated Organization: Processing 500 feet of special collection materials in under 18 months – Donica Martin and Angela Solis [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Signatures as identity tool: implications for name authority work in historical collections and beyond – Ashlea Green [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Turning A Challenge into Education: MA Museum Administration Students Undertake a Real-Life Collections Management Project – Alyse Hennig [Abstract/Bio] [Poster]

Peer-Reviewed Research Papers

Developing a Framework to Enable Collaboration in Computational Archival Science Education – Richard Marciano, Gregory Jansen, and William Underwood [Paper]

Macro-appraisal and Professional Communities – Cory L. Nimer [Paper]

A Research Study of Inventory Practices in Archives in the United States: Scalability and Process – Patrice-Andre Prud’homme and JJ Compton [Paper]

 

New Case Study: Engaging History of Science Students with Primary Sources

Despite a significant portion of non-English science and technology texts, Leigh Rupinski, archivist in Special Collections and University Archives at Grand Valley State University Libraries, devises an interactive lesson plan to engage history of science students visiting the archives. Read all about it in “Bingo! Engaging History of Science Students with Primary Sources,” which is the thirteenth case in the open access series Case Studies on Teaching With Primary Sources sponsored by SAA’s Reference, Access, and Outreach Section.