Call for Nominations: SAA Awards

While there are many awards that SAA gives, here are the ones related to publishing. Please consider submitting a nomination!

  • C.F.W. Coker Award  (for finding aids, tools or projects that involve innovative development in archival description)
  • Waldo Gifford Leland Award  (for writing of superior excellence and usefulness in the field of archival history, theory, or practice)
  • Theodore Calvin Pease Award  (for superior writing achievement by a student of archival studies as nominated by his/her instructor)

 

Call for Case Studies: Native American Archivists Section

In August 2018, the SAA Council issued a statement endorsing the Protocols for Native American Archival Materials as an external standard of the organization.  The Protocols establish best practices for the culturally responsive care and use of Native American archival materials, particularly materials that are housed in non-tribal institutions.

This series of case studies, sponsored by the Native American Archivists Section (NAAS) of SAA, is intended to help archivists, librarians, museum curators, and other professionals who work with Native American archival materials see how the Protocols can be adapted for use in a variety of institutional contexts.  More broadly, the case studies series is designed to highlight evolving access policies to Native American materials, whether or not these policies are based specifically on the Protocols.

Elements of a Case Study:

Case studies are intended to demonstrate real-world examples of the ways in which contributors and their institutions have developed and/or implemented access policies for culturally sensitive Native American archival materials.  Contributors are encouraged to write about the challenges of developing and implementing these access policies in their institutional contexts, as well as their successes.  Case studies from all sizes and types of institutions are welcomed, as are case studies focusing on various types of culturally sensitive archival materials (textual, photographic, audio/visual, etc.).  Case studies contributed by single authors or multiple authors are also welcome.

Each case study should include the following basic elements:

  • An introduction, which describes the institutional context and relevant Native American archival materials
  • narrative, which describes the development and/or implementation of access policies to those materials and any challenges or barriers encountered
  • conclusion, which describes lessons learned and ongoing development and/or modification of the access policies

A key component of best practices for the care and use of culturally sensitive Native American archival materials is collaboration with Native American communities.  Case studies that reflect Native American communities’ experiences with institutions’ evolving access policies are also encouraged.

Preparing and Submitting Your Case Study:

To inquire about submitting a case study, please contact the series editors: Rose Buchanan, NAAS Steering Committee Member rose.buchanan@nara.gov], and Caitlin Haynes, NAAS Vice Chair [haynesce@si.edu]. Submissions are needed for summer-fall 2019, and will be posted to the SAA Case Study Series website on a rolling basis.

Case studies should be between 1,500 and 5,000 words.  Authors are responsible for understanding and following the principles that govern the “fair use” of quotations and illustrations, and for obtaining written permission to publish where necessary.  Accuracy in citations is also the author’s responsibility.  SAA prefers the current edition of the Chicago Manual of Style with endnote formatting for citations.

Review Process:

All submissions will be reviewed by two volunteer reviewers from the NAAS Steering Committee or from the NAAS membership.  Submissions will be evaluated according to a rubric.  Reviewers will return the case study and completed rubric within three weeks of receipt to the series editors.  The series editors will review the feedback and make an editorial decision, consulting with the NAAS Steering Committee and SAA Publications Editor as necessary.  The series editors will communicate a publication decision to the author(s) within five weeks of the receipt of the submission.

  • For rejected case studies: The series editors will communicate the rejection to the author(s) and provide the reasons for this editorial decision.
  • For a recommendation of revise and resubmit: The series editors will communicate the decision to the author(s) and negotiate a reasonable window of time for resubmission.
    • Resubmitted case studies will be reviewed by the series editors and at least one of the original reviewers to ensure that recommended changes have been satisfactorily incorporated.  The series editors, in consultation with the NAAS Steering Committee, ultimately make the decision to publish or reject resubmitted case studies.  The series editors will communicate that decision to the author(s).
  • For case studies accepted for publication: The series editors will communicate the acceptance to the author(s).

A submission will not be considered if it is being reviewed by another publishing outlet at the same time, or if it has been published previously in a similar form.

Publication Process:

Once accepted, case studies will be submitted to the SAA Publications Editor and Director of Publishing for light copyediting.  If major changes are needed, a version tracking those changes will be sent to the author for confirmation.  After the author signs off on a final version, SAA will format the case study and post it to the Case Study Series website as a PDF.

Copyright in the case study will remain with the author, and SAA will acknowledge this in the copyright line that appears with the case study.  Authors will consent, grant, and assign to SAA the non-exclusive right to publish and/or distribute all or any part of the case study throughout the world in electronic or any other medium.  In return, SAA agrees to publish the work under a Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives license.

SAA Author Wins Award

Alex Poole Receives Award for Article in American Archivist 
Alex Poole, assistant professor at Drexel University’s College of Computing and Informatics, received the 2018 Bob Williams History Fund Research Paper Award from the Association for Information Science and Technology for his article, “Harold T. Pinkett and the Lonely Crusade of African American Archivists in the Twentieth Century,” which appeared in American Archivist Vol. 80.2. Of the article, the jury said, “Poole’s fascinating and well-researched account of the role of African Americans in the development of archives in the United States addresses a much-neglected topic of diverse contributions to archival theory and practice.” Read the award-winning article here

SAA Bookstore: New Epubs Available

7 New Epubs Available in the SAA Bookstore
Prefer digital to print? Now you can read SAA’s latest releases in epub and PDF formats! Putting Descriptive Standards to Work, edited by Kris Kiesling and Christopher J. Prom, is the most recent book in the Trends in Archives Practice series. Buy the entire volume (epub PDF) or purchase Modules 17–20 individually:

  • MODULE 17: Implementing DACS: A Guide to the Archival Content Standard by Cory Nimer (epub PDF);
  • MODULE 18: Using EAD by Kelcy Shepherd (epub | PDF);
  • MODULE 19: Introducing EAC-CPF by Katherine M. Wisser (epub PDF);
  • MODULE 20: Sharing Archival Metadata by Aaron Rubinstein (epub PDF).

Also available is Moving Image and Sound Collections for Archivists by Anthony Cocciolo (epub PDF) as well as Privacy and Confidentiality Perspectives: Archivists and Archival Records, edited by Menzi L. Behrnd-Klodt and Peter J. Wosh (epub PDF).

New: Case Studies on Teaching With Primary Sources

There are now five case studies available, check them out!

CASE 1
Collaborating for Impact in Teaching with Primary Sources
 

by SAMANTHA CRISP

CASE 2
Teaching Citations as a Multi-functional Approach to Archives Instruction 

by HELEN McMANUS and LEAH RICHARDSON

CASE 3
Fostering Historical Empathy in Unusual Times: A Case Study of the Course “OSU, Women and Oral History: An Exploration of 150 Years”
by CHRIS PETERSEN and TIAH EDMUNSON-MORTON

CASE 4
Crafting a Research Question: Differentiated Teaching for Instruction With Primary Sources Across Diverse Learning Levels 
by JEN HOYER, KAITLIN HOLT, JULIA PELAEZ

CASE 5
Exploring Ephemerality, Biases, and Silences in Archives
by ERIN DIX

SAA Archives Short Fiction Contest 2018

When you work in archives, you collect many stories from the past—some touching, some hilarious, some unbelievable but true. With the Archives Short Fiction Contest, the SAA Publications Board invites you to try your hand at creating the story, using archives as the main character. The contest is open to all members of SAA.

Submission Guidelines: 

  • The story must feature an archives, an archivist, or archival materials.
  • Stories must be no more than 3,000 words in length and must be submitted in MS Word.
  • One submission per entrant.
  • Please do not submit work that has been previously published.
  • Submissions will be evaluated by a jury of three archivists (to be determined by the SAA Publications Board), who will select a winner.
  • Winner will receive a cash prize of $250. The winning entry will be published in Archival Outlook and as a featured item on the SAA website.
  • Author retains copyright but grants permission to SAA to publish winning entry.

SAA Events on Writing and Publishing

‘Tis that time of year again! SAA is fast approaching and here are the opportunities to participate in their events related to writing and publishing.

Every year, I go to the Write Away Forum, toast to authors, and spend time in the bookstore. I like to hang out with others interested in writing and publishing. I cannot emphasize enough how participating in these can lead to opportunities. It is because of conversations I had at the Write Away Forum back in 2011 that began my involvement in SAA publishing.

So don’t be shy – if you have an idea for a book or article, want to get involved, or just wanting to find out more about the processes, go to these events and ask questions. All the SAA staff and editors are wonderful people to talk to. And if you see me – come say hi, I’d love to chat!

“What Does That Mean? Building SAA’s New Dictionary” Forum (Thursday, 7:30 am) – Shared language helps to define a community. Get the latest word on the forthcoming Dictionary of Archives Terminology and tweet new terms at #SAAwords.

“Write Away!” Forum (Friday, 7:30 am) – Write for SAA! Learn how to contribute content to American Archivist, Reviews Portal, Archival Outlook, case studies, blogs, and books, and ask questions of editors and staff.

Brown Bag Lunch Discussions (Friday, 12:30 pm) – Two options: Be among the first to read and chat about the forthcoming American Archivist article, “‘Be Damned Pushy at Times’: The Committee on the Status for Women and Feminism in the Archival Profession, 1972–1998” OR dive into the One Book, One Profession selection Perspectives on Women’s Archives. RSVP Abigail Christian at achristian@archivists.org.

Toast to SAA Authors (Thursday, 2:45-3:15) – Hoist a glass of lemonade to those who have written for SAA publications—journal, magazine, books, modules, case studies, literature and resource reviews—in the past year.

And of course don’t forget to stop at the bookstore!