New/Recent Publications: Books

In Our Own Voices, Redux: The Faces of Librarianship Today
Edited by Teresa Y. Neely and Jorge R. López-McKnight

The Year in C-SPAN Archives Research: Volume 4
Robert X. Browning

Records, Information and Data: Exploring the role of record-keeping in an information culture
Geoffrey Yeo

Torn from Their Bindings: A Story of Art, Science, and the Pillaging of American University Libraries
Travis McDade

Digitisation of Culture: Namibian and International Perspectives
Editors: Dharm Singh, JatJürgen Sieck, Hippolyte N’Sung-Nza Muyingi, Heike Winschiers-Theophilus, Anicia Peters, Shawulu Nggada

The Sentient Archive: Bodies, Performance, and Memory
Edited by Bill Bissell and Linda Caruso Haviland

Documenting Performance: The Context and Processes of Digital Curation and Archiving
Editor Toni Sant

Hidden Hemingway: Inside the Ernest Hemingway Archives of Oak Park
Robert K. Elder, Aaron Vetch and Mark Cirino

Sins against Nature: Sex and Archives in Colonial New Spain
Zeb Tortorici

The International Directory of National Archives
Edited by Patricia C. Franks and Anthony Bernier

Digital Curation Projects Made Easy: A Step-by-Step Guide for Libraries, Archives, and Museums
Carmen Cowick

Call for Chapters: Digital Technologies and Indigenous and Marginalized Communities

Call for book chapters on the preservation and advancement of indigenous and marginalized communities through the creative use of digital technologies: book to be published by Rowman and Littlefield in 2019.

This is a call for book chapters that focus on the preservation and advancement of indigenous and marginalized communities through the creative use of digital technologies. While it is expected contributing authors will come primarily from memory institutions (archives, museums and libraries), contributors from academic and non-profit organizations are also welcome.  Essay may address theoretical issues, scholarly research or case studies at the authors’ institutions.

Please send a one-page abstract to Marta Deyrup  (Marta.Deyrup@shu.edu) by September 17th.

Do not hesitate to contact me if you would like more information or would like to discuss your ideas in advance.

Dr. Marta Deyrup
University Libraries
Seton Hall University
Marta.deyrup@shu.edu
Web: https://works.bepress.com/marta_deyrup/

CFP: Critical Librarianship and Library Management

This call does not specifically mention archives, but the topics are applicable.

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Call for proposals

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Critical Librarianship and Library Management
Publication due 2020

Series Editor: Samantha Hines, Peninsula College
Volume Editor: David Ketchum, University of Oregon

The critical librarianship movement has shone light on many aspects of our profession and encouraged us to question why we do things the way we do them. One area underexplored in this moment, however, is library management: Are there management practices that need to be questioned or interrogated? Are there progressive practices that have not received the recognition they deserve?

ALAO seeks submissions for the “Critical Librarianship and Library Management” volume that delve beyond examples and case studies to critically examine library management.

Proposals in the following areas would be of particular interest:
Implicit bias and library management/operations
Retention and hiring for diversity and inclusion
Social justice in library leadership and management
This will be the first volume of Advances in Library Administration and Organization (ALAO) to publish in 2020.

About the Advances in Library Administration and Organization series:

ALAO offers long-form research, comprehensive discussions of theoretical developments, and in-depth accounts of evidence-based practice in library administration and organization. The series answers the questions, “How have libraries been managed, and how should they be managed?” It goes beyond a platform for the sharing of research to provide a venue for dialogue across issues in a way that traditional peer reviewed journals cannot. Through this series, practitioners glean new approaches in challenging times and collaborate on the exploration of scholarly solutions to professional quandaries.

How to submit:

We are currently seeking proposals for the 2019 volume on Critical Librarianship and Library Management. If you are interested in contributing to this volume, please send a proposal including a draft abstract of 500 words or less, author details and estimated length of final submission to Samantha Hines at shines@pencol.edu by August 31, 2018.

Submission deadlines:

Submission deadline for proposals: August 31, 2018
Notification of acceptance sent by: October 31, 2018
Submission deadline for full chapters: February 28, 2019
Comments returned to authors: April 30, 2019
Submission deadline for chapter revisions: June 15, 2019

CFP: Historical Geography, GIScience and Text: Mapping Landscapes of Time and Place

This call connects the topic briefly to archives, and may be of interest to those who incorporate GIS into archival work.

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Charles Travis (UT, Arlington) Alexander von Lunen (Huddersfield University) and Francis Ludlow (Trinity College Dublin)

History is not the past, but a map of the past drawn from a particular point of view to be useful to the modern traveler. Henry Glassie

In the West, geography as a discipline emerged from the twin pursuits of Strabo’s poetic impressions of place, and Herodotus’ chronicles of events and culture. Eratosthenes, who calculated the spherical nature of the Earth while keeper of the Great Library at Alexandria, and Ptolemy brought to the methods of measurement, scale and geometry to the discipline. Thus literature, history and geographical analysis (discursive, cartographical, phenomenological and statistical) have long been interrelated pursuits. Contemporarily, historical geography possesses tributaries which fountain from the robust humanistic academic traditions of many countries: England, Ireland, Sweden, France, Germany, and lesser so in North, Central and South America. The practice of historical geography complements approaches in cultural geography through a triangulation of discursive, cartographic and visual narrative styles, and primary, textual and archival data explorations, with both calibrated by the development of qualitative and quantitative methods, models and theories.

[1] Such approaches intersect with geographical history’s focus on physical landscapes, climate and topography, -interests commensurate with the geosciences. By focusing on scales of agency, interaction, scientific inquiry and causation, geographical history maps the multiple variables that have shaped human and natural history, in the longue durée-a scale of time traditionally neglected in history, geography and cognate disciplines.[2] As W. Gordon East, in The Geography Behind Historyobserves:

The familiar analogy between geography and history as the stage and the drama is in several respects misleading, for whereas a play can be acted on any stage regardless of its particular features, the course of history can never be entirely unaffected by the varieties and changes of its settings. History, again, unlike drama, is not rehearsed before enactment, and so different and so changeful are its manifestations that it certainly lacks all unity of place, time and action.[3]

Although many historians, geographers and geoscientists regard geographical information science (GIS), as a mapping practice, its platforms have evolved into new types of visual database technology, and interactive media. As a database technology, GIS spatially parses and itemizes attribute data (as a row of statistics, a string of text, an image, a movie) linking coordinates to representations of the locations to which the data refers.[4]As a form of media, GIS holds the possibility to “transcend the instrumental rationality currently rampant among both GIS developers and GIS practitioners and cultivate a more holistic approach to the non-linear relationships between GIS and society.”[5]With the advent of the digital and coding revolutions “the idea of nature is becoming very hard to separate from the digital tools and media we use to observe, interpret, and manage it.”[6]In this light, historical geography methods can help address “the underlying complexities in the human organization of space that present methodological problems for GIS in linking empirical research questions with alternative theoretical frameworks.”[7]It has been recognized that if “we seek a rich and humanistic [digital humanities] capable of meeting more than the technical challenges of our massive geo-temporal datasets, we must develop design approaches that address recent theoretical merging’s of background and foreground, space, and time”.[8]

In this regard, GIScience has broadened its domain, and is entering into the fields of gaming, journalism, movies and broadcasting. These new GIScience fields, paired with historical geography methods, can appropriate (post) and modernist narratives by incorporating avant-garde artistic and filmic techniques that employ flashback, jump cut and ensemble storylines to represent time-spaces as contingent, rendered fluid montages. Dynamically animated three-dimensional historical geography GIScience models, anchored by the coordinate grids of latitude and longitude, now allow us to synchronize phenomenological impressions with Cartesian perspectives. John Lewis Gaddis, in The Landscape of History (2002), asks, “What if we were to think of history as a kind of mapping?”[9]Gaddis then links the ancient practice of mapmaking within the archetypal three-part conception of time (past, present, and future). Mapping and narrative are both practices that attempt to manage infinitely complex subjects by imposing abstract grids—in forms such as longitude and latitude or hours and days to frame landscapes and timescapes. If the past is a landscape and historical narrative the way we represent it, then pattern recognition constitutes the primary form of human perception, and can thus be parsed empirically, statistically and phenomenologically.[10]

The aim of this collection is therefore to re-explore relations between historical geography, GIS and text. The collection will revisit, discuss and illustrate current case studies, trends and discourses in European, American and non-Western spheres, in which historical geography is being practiced in concert with human and physical applications of GIS (qualitative, quantitative, critical, proprietary, open-source, ‘neogeographic’ public-participation, geoscientific, human-centric) and text- broadly conceived as archival, literary, historical, cultural, climatic, scientific, digital, cinematic and media. The concept of time (again, broadly conceived) is the pivot around which the contributions to this volume will revolve. By focusing on research engagements between historical geography, GIS and literary and textual studies, this volume aims to chart a course into uncharted interdisciplinary waters where the Hun-Lenox Globe, built in 1510 warned sailors of Hic sunt dracones (Here be dragons). Our aim is to explore new patterns of historical, geographical and textual perception that exist beyond the mists of our current ontological and epistemological shores of knowledge.

This edited volume will consist of three sections that focus on the relations between historical geography, GIS and text (broadly conceived)

  • The first section’s chapters will trace and re-evaluate historical geography, geographical history, cartography, textual practices over the past one hundred years or so. In addition, chapters will also focus on the emergence of GIS and the geospatial humanities / digital geo-humanities.
  • The second section will feature standard case study chapters (as well as works in progress, in addition to alternative approaches- such as counterfactual studies, digital environmental humanities, etc.)
  • The third section will feature chapters featuring emerging theoretical and state of the art projects, It will also include chapters that consider prospective ways in which historical, GIScience and textual studies could create further bridges between the arts, humanities and sciences.

Possible topics (suggested topics also welcomed):

  • Re-evaluating Historical Geography in light of GIScience and Text (and vice-versa).
  • Braudelianlongue durée, histoire conjucturelle, histoire événmentielle,
  • Literature, natural history and GIScience.
  • Travel writing, history, landscape, mapping.
  • Art history, photography, cinematography.
  • Cliometrics, Critical GIS and GIScience.
  • Palaeography, prosopography, GIScience, place, landscape, environment, climate.
  • Imaginaryexperiments: counterfactual historical GIScience modelling / counterfactual design / contrasting factual and counterfactualHistorical GIScience models.
  • Three-dimensional, immersive, gaming virtual reality GIScience environmental models which allow the influence of human agency to operate within physical, climatic and historical landscapes projected upon the walls, floor and ceiling of an enclosed space.
  • History,climate and landscape.
  • Physical geographies & cultural palimpsests.
  • Historicalclimatology / climate history.
  • Historicalcartography and global warming.
  • Spatialhistory & geography.
  • Medicalcartography, culture, epidemiology.
  • Militarycampaigns, and human and physical landscapes.
  • Historical geographies of space exploration.
  • Planetary mapping, Sci-Fi and historical GIScience.
  • Representations of GIS in fiction, movies, museums, amusement parks, zoos, eco-tourism.
  • Geosophy, GIScience, text.
  • GIScience chronology vs. GIScience chronometry.
  • Topois of past, present future.
  • Deep Mapping & Deep Charting
  • Digital and environmental humanities.
  • Nautical and maritime history, records and GIScience.
  • Geography as historical document & GIScience.
  • Genography, GIScience, history, culture.
  • Geology, natural history, GIScience and text.

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE

I. 1 September 2018: (Early submissions encouraged) 250-500 word chapter abstracts (and curriculum vita) submitted to Charles Travis (charles.travis@uta.edu), Alexander von Lunen (A.F.VonLuene@hud.ac.uk) and Francis Ludlow (ludlowf@tcd.ie)

II. 15 September 2018: Notification of Abstract Acceptance.

III. 1 December 2018: Contributor chapters due (5000 – 6000 words max).

IV. 15 December 2018: Edited chapters sent back to contributors for revisions.

V. 15 January 2019: Contributor revisions due.

VI. 15 February 2019: Book submitted to publisher.

Notes


[1]Phil Birge-Liberman, “Historical Geography” in Encyclopedia of Geography, Ed. Barney Warf, Vol. 3. Sage Reference, 2010, pp. 1428-1432.

[2] R. J. Mayhew, 2011. “Historical geography, 2009-2010: Geohistoriography, the forgotten Braudel and the place of nominalism.” Progress in Human Geography, 35(3), 2011, pp. 409-421. (pg. 410)

[3]W. Gordon East. 1965. The Geography Behind History. New York: Norton & Company, Inc., pg. 2

[4]Ian N. Gregory, and R.G. Healey, “Historical GIS: structuring, mapping and analysing geographies of the past.” Progress in Human Geography, 31(5), 2007, pp.638-653

[5]D.Z. Sui, and M.F. Goodchild, “GIS as media?” International Journal of Geographical Information Science, 15(5), 2001, pp. 387-390.

[6]Finn Arne Jørgensen, “The Armchair Traveler’s Guide to Digital Environmental Humanities.” Environmental Humanities4, 2014, pp. 95-112.

[7]D.G. Janelle, “Time-space. In Geography” in: N.J. Smelser and P.B. Baltes, eds. International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Amsterdam: Pergamon-Elsevier Science, 2001, pp. 15746-15749.

[8]Bethany Nowviskie, “Digital Humanities in the Anthropocene.” Nowviskie.org(blog), July 10, 2014 <http://nowviskie.org/2014/anthropocene/>

[9]J. L. Gaddis, The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past(Oxford: Oxford University Press,2002), 32.

[10]J. L. Gaddis, The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past(Oxford: Oxford University Press,2002), 32.

Contact Info:Dr. Charles Travis, Department of History, University of Texas, Arlington, U.S.A. (charles.travis@uta.edu), ; Dr. Alexander Von Lunen, History, University of Huddersfield, U.K. (A.F.VonLuene@hud.ac.uk) and Dr. Francis Ludlow, Trinity Centre for Environmental Humanities, Trinity College, The University of Dublin, Ireland (ludlowf@tcd.ie)

Contact Email: charles.travis@uta.edu

 

Call for Chapter Proposals: Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs: Structures, Practices, and Contexts

This call does not specifically mention archives, but the call is open to topics other than what’s listed.

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We are soliciting chapter proposals for our forthcoming ACRL book, Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs: Structures, Practices, and Contexts with an anticipated publication date of August 2019. Information literacy (IL) is a well-established goal of academic libraries, yet so much of the day-to-day work of running and coordinating information literacy programs is absent from professional literature, job descriptions, and library school coursework. While the definition of a program is a coordinated set of activities in service of a specific purpose, what those activities actually consist of – and who is responsible for them – is highly dependent on institutional and interpersonal contexts. Furthermore, while skills and competencies for leadership in LIS are well-researched and articulated, those required for effective program management, particularly indirect management of others, are not as well-represented. This book will gather program examples to make visible the structures, practices, and contexts of information literacy programs in academic libraries

We are seeking chapters from academic librarians who identify as a leader of an information literacy program who want to share their experiences.

Focus of the Book:

This edited volume will present a series of structured case studies written by leaders of information literacy programs across the United States and Canada. Each chapter will detail definitions and missions, allocation of resources and labor, supervisory structures, prioritization approaches, and other processes and structures required to make programs work. By following the same template we will help identify commonalities and differences across all types of programs and institutions while allowing individual stories and unique contexts to shine through. Don’t worry; we’ll provide the template! This book’s intended audience is new and aspiring information literacy program coordinators, administrators, and seasoned coordinators, looking for examples, evidence, and strategies to grow and/or sustain new or existing programs.

Anticipated Program Types:

  • One-person IL programs
  • Community College IL programs
  • IL within its own instruction department
  • IL distributed across a liaison model
  • New or newly revived programs
  • Long-standing legacy programs

Don’t see your program represented here? Perfect! We definitely want you to submit your proposal! If you have any questions contact the editors at hiddenarchitecturesbook@gmail.com to discuss how your idea may fit within this book’s scope.

Proposal Guidelines:

To submit a proposal, fill out the short online proposal form. The form will require:

  • Author names, job titles, and institutional affiliations
  • Up to 500-word description of your program including type of institution and population served
  • 1-2 sentence description for each template area of what you plan to discuss if your proposal is accepted for inclusion

Proposals are due by August 1, 2018 and must be submitted via online form: http://bit.ly/SubmitHiddenArch

Acceptance

  • Contributors will be notified of their status (acceptance or rejection) within 3-4 weeks of the due date of proposals.
  • Proposals will be conditionally accepted based on the authentic snapshot of their program as represented in the template and description. We’re looking for the realities of coordinating a program in its entirety and not just best practices or one shiny project.
  • In the final collection we aim to represent a range of program and institution types; this will influence which proposals are accepted.
  •  
  • Final chapter format should follow the Endnotes-Bibliography format in the Chicago Manual of Style (17th edition) and the Chapter Template here.
  • ACRL will send publication agreements to individual chapter authors that allow them to keep copyright of their chapters, apply a CC license of their choosing, and request final copies for their institutional repositories, indexing sites, etc.

Timeline

  • The first draft of chapters will be due November 2018, second draft in January 2019, and final draft in April 2019
  • Estimated length of chapter: 2,500–4,000 words
  • Projected publication date: August 2019

Contact us at: hiddenarchitecturesbook@gmail.com

~~~

Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Information Literacy Coordinator, Cal State Dominguez Hills
Elizabeth Galoozis, Head of Information Literacy, University of Southern California
Rebecca Halpern, Teaching & Learning Services Coordinator, The Claremont Colleges

CFP: Sexuality in Libraries

Working Title: Sexuality in Libraries
Editors: Brian Flaherty and Alana Kumbier
Publisher: Library Juice Press
Deadline for proposals: August 13, 2018

Access to information about sex, and platforms for sex education, have changed radically in the digital era. As curators and providers of information about sexuality, librarians have a responsibility to keep up with developments in both the types of information available, and the platforms on which that information is most readily accessible. In addition, sex is different: collecting and curating sex-related materials, as well as providing sex related information, are both fraught with a variety of issues including personal, political and religious values, age-appropriateness, censorship, and collection maintenance (less generously: vandalism).

This handbook will support professionals interested in developing critical approaches to work at the intersection of sex information, sexuality education, and librarianship. It is intended to help librarians build collections, recommend resources, and create a comfortable and supportive environment for patrons to do sex-related research. Our hope is that the collection will address how we can address issues of sexuality information in our teaching, cataloging, programming, and outreach.

Martha Cornog and Timothy Perper’s guide For Sex Education, See Librarian: A Guide to Issues and Resources (1996) is a key predecessor for this work, essential for understanding issues around sex information in libraries. We hope to build on its foundation by creating a resource that addresses the issues with the same breadth and intelligence, and to bring that information into the present. Among other things: discourses around gender and sexuality have changed; we have new vocabularies for sex, gender identity and expression, and orientation; the scope of sexuality education has changed to incorporate intersectional identities; porn and information literacy has become an essential facet of any discussion of sexuality information; and the legal and cultural discussion around sexuality and alternative sexualities has morphed to be almost unrecognizable to someone working in this area 20 years ago.

Perhaps more importantly, the media for delivering information – especially sexuality information – has changed entirely since the issue of sexuality information in libraries was comprehensively addressed. When For Sex Education…. was written (in 1995) the internet was just beginning to grow into the ubiquitous presence it is today, cell phones weren’t especially common, and nobody could even fathom a hand-held computer more powerful than the most expensive desk-top. The internet changed the way people access information in libraries, changed the role of librarian as curator of information, and made digital information literacy an essential component of librarianship. The proposed book aspires to address all of these issues in the context of sexuality information in libraries.

The work will begin with a collection of chapters authored by experts, addressing different aspects of sex information in libraries. Though authored by individual experts, the book is intended as a cohesive handbook on sexuality information in libraries.

Possible topics for chapters include, but are not limited to:
• The Role of Libraries in Sexuality Education
• History of Libraries and Sexuality Materials
• Sex Education: Past and Present
• Cataloging and Classification of Sexuality Materials
• Censorship of Sexuality Materials
• Special Collections: Sexuality-related Special Collections in Institutional Contexts
• Sexuality archives (including digital archives)
• Libraries as welcoming spaces
• Negotiating ethics, boundaries, identities and embodiments as librarians and sex educators Reference consultations and sexuality education
• Sex information and critical digital information literacy
• Joining sex education communities of practice
• Bringing particular theoretical or conceptual frames to the points at which librarians support access to sexual information and education (e.g., intersectionality, transgender theory, critical pedagogy)

Timeline:
CFP Distributed: Early June 2018
Deadline for chapter proposals and resource guide section editors: September 1, 2018
Notification of accepted proposals: November 15, 2018
First drafts due: May 17, 2019
Second drafts due: August 23, 2019
Final drafts due: November 1, 2019
Final editing & manuscript submission: December 2019 – January 2020

We encourage submissions from librarians and archivists, library and archives workers, and sexuality educators, scholars and activists. We also welcome perspectives from a variety of organizational and institutional contexts, including public libraries, academic libraries, special collections, archives, grassroots libraries and archives, community programs, and more.

Please email abstracts of up to 500 words to sexualityinlibraries (at) gmail (dot) com

For chapter proposals:
Abstracts for your proposed contribution should include the topic(s) you intend to cover, and a short biographical statement indicating your areas of subject expertise and/or experience relevant to the collection. You are welcome to submit multiple abstracts about different possible chapters. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editors may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.

Final chapters will be in the 4000-6000 word range.

About the editors:
Brian Flaherty is the instructional services librarian at Boston University School of Law. He is also the co-founder and co-director of Partners in Sex Education, teaching comprehensive sex education to middle school and high school youth in Greater Boston. He has written and edited sex education curricula, and presented at local and national conferences, including a keynote at the 2014 National Sex Education Conference, “Sex Mythbusters!”

Alana Kumbier is a research and instruction librarian at Hampshire College. They are the author of Ephemeral Material: Queering the Archive (Litwin Books 2014), a book about LGBTQ community archiving practices and methodologies. They are co-editor of Critical Library Instruction: Theories and Methods (Library Juice Press 2010), a foundational collection of essays on critical pedagogy and library instruction.

Please contact Brian and Alana at SexualityInLibraries@gmail.com with any questions.

New/Recent Publications: Books

Science in the Archives: Pasts, Presents, Futures
Lorraine Daston, ed.
(University of Chicago Press, 2017)

Human Operators: A Critical Oral History on Technology in Libraries and Archives
Melissa Morrone, ed.
(Library Juice Press, 2018)

Music Preservation and Archiving Today
edited by Norie Guthrie and Scott Carlson
(Rowman & Littlefield, 2018)

Digital Humanities, Libraries, and Partnerships: A Critical Examination of Labor, Networks, and Community
Edited by: Robin Kear and Kate Joranson

Black Slavery in the Maritimes: A History in Documents (From the Broadview Sources Series)
Edited by: Harvey Amani Whitfield

The Tchaikovsky Papers: Unlocking the Family Archive
Edited by Marina Kostalevsky; Translated by Stephen Pearl; Adapted from the Russian Edition, Compiled, and Edited by Polina E. Vaidman

Falsifying Beckett: Essays on Archives, Philosophy, and Methodology in Beckett Studies
Matthew Feldman