New/Recent Publications: Books

Miscellaneous Order: Manuscript Culture and the Early Modern Organization of Knowledge
Angus Vine
(Oxford University Press, 2019)

Reference Librarianship & Justice: History, Practice & Praxis
Editors: Kate Adler, Ian Beilin, and Eamon Tewell
(Library Juice Press, 2018)

Encyclopedia of Archival Writers, 1515 – 2015
Edited by Luciana Duranti and Patricia C. Franks
(Rowman & Littlefield, 2019)

Miscellaneous Order: Manuscript Culture and the Early Modern Organization of Knowledge
Angus Vine
(Oxford University Press, 2019)

Crowdsourcing our Cultural Heritage
Edited by Mia Ridge
(Routledge, 2017)

Ethics for Records and Information Management
Norman A. Mooradian
(ALA Neal-Shuman, 2018)

Remembering and Forgetting in the Digital Age
Authors: Florent Thouvenin, Peter Hettich, Herbert Burkert, Urs Gasser
(Springer International Publishing, 2018)

The Routledge Handbook of Audiovisual Translation
Edited by Luis Pérez-González
(Routledge, 2018)

The Missing Pages: The Modern Life of a Medieval Manuscript, from Genocide to Justice
Heghnar Zeitlian Watenpaugh
(Stanford University Press, 2019)

Leadership Matters: Leading Museums in an Age of Discord 2nd Edition
Anne W. Ackerson, Joan H. Baldwin
(American Association for State and Local History, 2019)

Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts: The St. Chad Gospels, Materiality, Recoveries, and Representation in 2D & 3D
Bill Endries
(ARC Humanities Press, 2019)

Archives
Andrew Lison, Tomislav Medak, Marcell Mars, Rick Prelinger
(Open access from Meson Press; available for purchase from The University of Minnesota Press)

Retroactivism in the Lesbian Archives: Composing Pasts and Futures
Jean Bessette
(Southern Illinois University Press, 2017)

Call for Chapters: Engaging Undergraduates in Primary Source Research

Dear colleagues,

I am soliciting chapter proposals for a book titled Engaging Undergraduates in Primary Source Research. Part of Rowman & Littlefield’s Innovations in Information Literacy series, this book seeks to present success stories of how faculty and librarians can create and facilitate engaging and productive learning experiences with primary sources in the undergraduate classrooms. The co-authored chapters (5,000 words) by librarians and their faculty partners will showcase the work of librarians from various areas of library operations and their faculty collaborators in different disciplines, including the sciences and social sciences.

Sample topics include:

  • Constructing settler colonialism from the indigenous perspectives
  • Understanding human-and-nature dynamics through local landscapes
  • Exploring the legacy of the Black Arts Movement through music
  • Mapping and tracing the globalization of commodities

Each case study should center on how students learn and practice information literacy competencies through their engagement with primary sources. By focusing on competencies that are applicable and transferrable across disciplinary boundaries, the case studies and the featured activities and assignments should be easily adopted by faculty and librarians to enhance or transform their primary source-related teaching practices.

Chapter structure:

  • Why the faculty member teaches with primary sources
  • The institutional context
  • How the faculty-librarian collaboration came about
  • What the collaboration involves: conversations, assignments and activities, library sessions and class discussions, etc.
    • Include guidelines—the ACRL Information Literacy Framework, the Primary Source Literacy guidelines, and discipline-specific guidelines—if they have informed your work.
  • Outcomes and assessment
  • Reflection
  • Conclusion

Timeline:

  • 600-800 word chapter proposal and tentative title—November 1, 2019
  • Notification of proposal acceptance—early January, 2020
  • First draft of the completed chapter—May 31, 2020
  • Feedback to contributors—July 31, 2020
  • Revised chapter to the editor—September 15, 2020
  • Feedback, including if the chapter draft is accepted or declined—November 15, 2020
  • Final draft to the editor—February, 2021

Please send your proposal, including author names, titles, and affiliations, to xul@lafayette.edu. Please feel free to contact me with any questions.

Editor: Lijuan Xu, Associate Director of Research & Instructional Services

Skillman Library, Lafayette College, Easton, PA  18042

Call for Chapters: Implementing Excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: A Handbook for Academic Libraries

Call for Chapter Proposals
Implementing Excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: A Handbook for Academic Libraries

Chapter proposals are requested for an edited volume titled Implementing Excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: A Handbook for Academic Libraries, to be published by the Association of College and Research Libraries. Head Editors are Brian Lym (Hunter College) and Corliss Lee (University of California, Berkeley), and Co-Editors are Tatiana Bryant (Adelphi University), Jonathan Cain (University of Oregon), and Kenneth Schlesinger (Lehman College).

We are seeking case studies, qualitative research studies, quantitative research studies, survey research studies, and other research-based solutions that can be implemented in today’s libraries. A more detailed outline appears below.

Proposals, including a 600-800 word abstract, should be submitted by August 19, 2019. Notification of acceptance will occur by the end of September 2019. Selected authors should expect to submit a full draft of their article no later than January 14, 2020.

Call for Proposals:
https://tinyurl.com/yyefwazv

Send questions to Head Editors Brian Lym (blym@hunter.cuny.edu) and Corliss Lee (clee@library.berkeley.edu).

Book Outline

The well-documented lack of diversity in the academic library workforce remains problematic, especially given growing expectations that the overall academic workforce be more representative of the increasingly diverse student bodies at our colleges and universities. That the lack of diversity is especially notable among the professional ranks (librarians, library leadership, and administrators) is indicative of inequity of opportunities for people of color and “minoritized” ethnic groups.

Further, remediation of racial and ethnic diversity in the academic library workplace raises broader diversity issues, including individuals with identities outside the gender binary and other individuals who face discrimination due to their sexual orientation, disabilities, religious affiliation, military status, age, or other identities.

Emerging efforts to diversify the academic library workplace are pointedly raising issues of inclusion in libraries where demographic homogeneity has historically prevailed. With Implementing  excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, we hope to capture emerging research and practice that
demonstrate ways academic libraries and librarians can work with and within their institutions to create a more equitable and representative workforce.

Part 1: Leveraging and Deploying Systemic and Bureaucratic/Structural Solutions
Since colleges and universities are hierarchical and complex systems with centralized and bureaucratic controls that can effect or impede transformative change, academic library leaders need to leverage and deploy formal structures and administrative resources to achieve DEI excellence.

Themes (Part 1):

  • Recruitment and Hiring
  • Retention and Advancement
  • Professional Development and Support
  • Assessment: Tracking DEI Progress

Part 2: Leveraging Collegial Networks, Politics, and Symbols:
Strengthening and Deepening Change for DEI Excellence; Acknowledging and deploying collegial networks, leveraging informal and formal political power, and symbolic resources to foster diversity, equity, and inclusion excellence in academic libraries.

Themes (Part 2):

  • Navigating Collegial Networks and Normative Expectations
  • Leveraging the Politics of Organizational Behavior (formal and informal power)
  • Reinforcing the Message: Deploying Change Through Deployment of Symbolic Activities

Call for Chapters – Teaching with Archives & Special Collections Cookbook (ACRL Publications)

CALL FOR “RECIPES” (CHAPTER PROPOSALS)

The Teaching with Archives & Special Collections Cookbook is seeking recipes!

We are now accepting recipe proposals detailing lesson plans or projects that demonstrate the integration of archives and special collections material into the classroom. We are seeking practical guides that provide an entry point to teaching with primary sources for information professionals new to teaching and learning with archives and special collections, including archivists, special collections librarians, and instruction librarians. Additionally, we seek innovative proposals that will serve as a resource for those experienced with teaching with primary sources and archives by providing a repository of ideas for when their lesson plans need to be refreshed and updated.

Recipes will include the following:

Recipes will follow the ACRL Cookbook format. Your 600- to 800-word submission must describe a successful lesson plan or activity using archives and special collections material. Please also include:

  • Recipe name (a.k.a. your “chapter” title)
  • Your name, university or other affiliation
  • Your email address, if you would like it included with your recipe (optional)
  • Potential cookbook category, section, and part (see below)

Submission information and due dates:

Email your draft recipes to jmp48@psu.edu by July 16, 2019

Notifications will be sent out in August 2019

Final recipes will be due on October 5, 2019

Cookbook Outline:

  1. Meal Prep: Teaching Archival Literacy

Lessons that prepare students for the situated and unique aspects of doing research in archives and special collections libraries. 

  1. Good Orderer: Teaching Search & Discovery in Archives & Special Collections

Lessons that help students make use of archival search and discovery tools, such as finding aids. 

  1. Food Critics: Teaching Primary Source Literacy

 Lessons that support student analysis of primary sources. 

  1. Something from the Cart: Exhibitions as Teaching & Learning

Lessons that utilize the exhibition of primary sources as a teaching and learning tool. 

  1. Community Picnics: K-12 & Non-course-related Instruction

      Lessons for K-12 & community audiences. 

  1. Takeout: Teaching with Digital Collections

Lessons that utilize digital collections to teach primary sources literacy outside of archives and special collections libraries’ physical spaces. 

Email jmp48@psu.edu with any questions. Please refer to The Embedded Librarians Cookbook (ACRL 2014), The First Year Experience Library Cookbook (ACRL 2017), and The Library Assessment Cookbook (ACRL 2017) for examples of format and tone. We are willing to be flexible with length, wording, style, and topics.  Creativity encouraged! We look forward to your proposals!

Editor:

Julie M. Porterfield, Instruction & Outreach Archivist, Penn State University Libraries

Call for Chapters: Digital Heritage in Cultural Conflicts

The DigiCONFLICT international Research Consortium are seeking proposals for chapter contributions to an academic, peer-reviewed, edited volume on uses and abuses of digital heritage in the context of socially and politically charged cultural conflicts.

DigiCONFLICT is a Research Consortium funded by the Joint Programming Initiative on Cultural Heritage. Its founding research partners are based in the United Kingdom, Poland, and Sweden, each exploring the impact of digital heritage in nationally framed cultural conflicts. While acknowledging the role digitalization plays in shaping transnational attitudes to cultural heritage, members of the DigiCONFLICT Research Consortium contest common convictions about the allegedly universal and democratic nature of digital heritage. Also recognizing the role digital heritage plays in increasing access to cultural heritage and in making cultural heritage products readily available across borders, they pay particular attention to the ways in which digital heritage reflects and frames given societies as well as their complex historical and cultural power structures.

Investigating how different professional, ethnic, national, civil and other interest groups anywhere in the world employ digital heritage to advance their agendas, we are interested in receiving empirically as well as theoretically underpinned chapter proposals on subjects, themes, and case studies related, but not limited, to questions such as:

  • How does specifically national politics affect digital definitions and the scope of what counts as cultural heritage?
  • How do transitions of in/tangible forms of cultural heritage into digital formats and displays affect public engagement with them?
  • How is the scope and value of cultural heritage being negotiated in diverse culturally, socially and politically charged digital contexts?
  • How do individuals and/or interest groups use and engage with digital heritage to resist acts of social, political, or cultural oppression/repression.
  • How do individuals or interest groups engage with digital heritage to enhance, modify, or contest forms of intergenerational communication about history and past experiences.

Members of the DigiCONFLICT Research Consortium take specific interest in multimedia museums, oral history, and photography as the most common media employed in the creation and dissemination of digital heritage. Nevertheless, keen to expand as well as delve deeper into this range of interests, we equally welcome chapter proposals on these and any other media and practices.

The volume editors will be the Consortium’s founding partners: Gil Pasternak (DigiCONFLICT Project Leader and UK Team Principal Investigator), Ewa Manikowska (Polish Team Principal Investigator), and Malin Thor Tureby (Swedish Team Principal Investigator). It will be published with a well-recognized, academic publisher, and it is intended that the book/chapters will be Open Access.

While preparing your proposal, you may want to know that each chapter in the edited volume will ideally range between 7,500 and 8,000 words (including notes and references/bibliography).

In addition, the proposals should not exceed 500 words while clearly identifying the subject and main argument of the intended contribution, and indicating with as much specificity as possible what primary sources are going to inform the discussion (for example, interviews, archival research, participant observations, digital ethnography etc).

A list of up to 5 keywords and a short bibliography of relevance to your proposal may also be included in the submission (i.e. beyond the 500 words already allocated).

All chapter proposals must be written in English, and should be sent to DigiCONFLICT@gmail.com by the 7th of June 2019.

Thank you very much and we look forward to hearing from you.

DigiCONFLICT | Research Consortium

Gil Pasternak, Project Leader and UK Team Principal Investigator
Ewa Manikowska, Polish Team Principal Investigator
Malin Thor Tureby, Swedish Team Principal Investigator

Contact Info:
For any queries please contact Dr Gil Pasternak
Contact Email: gpasternak@dmu.ac.uk

Call for Contributors: Transforming the Authority of the Archive: Undergraduate Pedagogy and Critical Digital Archives

Co-editors, Charlotte Nunes (Lafayette College Libraries) and Andi Gustavson (Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin)

We seek abstract proposals for contributions to an edited collection exploring how archives-based undergraduate pedagogy transforms the institutional authority of the archive.  We are proposing the collection to the peer-reviewed, open-access, digitally-native Lever Press in association with Fulcrum, a scholarly communications platform that allows for flexible multimedia research publication.  As such, we welcome contributions that may involve multiple media formats.

This edited collection will include perspectives from educators, archivists (both community- and institutionally-affiliated), and undergraduates involved in efforts to deconstruct and transform the institutional authority of the archive.  We will examine how these efforts and the evolving core values of higher education mutually influence each other.  How can emergent best practices in community-based digital archiving inform productive shifts in undergraduate pedagogy?  How can we transform our pedagogy to better prepare students to ethically engage with the digital archives they encounter and create?  And how can these transformations newly express the core values of higher education?

We seek contributions that frame archives-based pedagogy in terms of opportunities for students to find value in difference, seek equity, and practice collaboration. Contributions might touch on:

  • strategies for exposing students to critical debates in the archives field about access and discovery, community-led archiving, redescription efforts, metadata standards, deaccessioning protocols, etc.

  • practices to encourage critical engagement with the ethical challenges posed by working with digital archives: where are the gaps and absences in the digital record, what are the barriers to access, and what are the potential gains and risks of placing primary sources in digital environments?

  • projects that read archives against the grain in order to highlight perspectives that have not historically been centered in collection-building, but that are very much present in the archives.

  • collaborations to build more comprehensive collections where gaps and silences exist.

  • challenges and opportunities presented by the digital realm, which reduces barriers to access in some areas while raising new barriers in others.

Other topics contributors might address include (but are not limited to):

  • Postcustodial archives and pedagogy

  • Trauma-informed pedagogy and approaches to teaching and building digital archives that reflect histories of violence

  • Critical data modeling of archival collections

  • Teaching computational methods to surface patterns at scale in digital archival collections; “collections as data

  • Building sustainable collaborations between classrooms and community partners that extend beyond the single term

  • The rights of student collaborators on public-facing digital archival projects

  • Challenges and opportunities for students learning in new digital environments

Contributions will be prioritized for inclusion that include perspectives from current or former undergraduate collaborators, or that include these collaborators as co-authors.  Please send 300-500 word abstracts to co-editors Charlotte Nunes (nunesc@lafayette.edu) and Andi Gustavson (agustavson@utexas.edu).  Review of abstracts will begin April 1, 2019.

See also our MLA 2020 Special Session CFP, Transformative Archives-Based Pedagogy, deadline March 18, 2019.

CFP: The Memorial Museum in the Digital Age

Call for Contributors

E-book: The Memorial Museum in the Digital Age

The Memorial Museum in the Digital Age will be the first comprehensive review of thinking and practice related to the effects and affects of the digital for memorial museums. This type of commemorative and educational space has traditionally contained object-heavy displays to stand-in for people, cultures and things that have been destroyed. Whilst some critics believe that such exhibitions help provide a tangible ‘bridge between past and present’ (Joanne Hansen-Glucklich 2014) with objects, others have argued that they create ‘the illusion of simultaneity’ (Andrew Hoskins 2003), i.e. as if we can experience the past in the now. As Paul Williams (2007) contests, objects in the memorial museum can only ever point to the absent. This edited collection seeks to interrogate the impact the introduction of digital practices has had on these traditionally object-heavy spaces. It aims to bring together the voices of academics, archivists, activists and curators to explore questions such as:

  • How does the digital alter our relationship with things that remind us about loss and their association with the past through remediation?
  • To what extent can the digital expand the space of the memorial museum towards the ‘museum without walls’? What are the political and ethical consequences of this particularly in places where destruction of people, cultures and artefacts is ongoing?
  • To what extent are digital tools being used to interrogate spaces of contested memory?
  • How are memorial museums engaging with digital technologies? What are the challenges and opportunities of emerging platforms?
  • To what extent do concepts such as ‘the virtual’, ‘(im)materiality’, ‘loss’ and ‘interactivity’ inform uses of the digital in memorial museums and related archives?
  • To what extent can the digital offer opportunities for alternative, non-professional voices to produce, record and distribute memory of atrocities?
  • How might digital technologies challenge, change and expand our notion of what is meant by the ‘memorial museum’?
  • Where is the digital not being used and why?
  • How might the digital be used to resist practices of forgetting perpetuated by official State, national and transnational memorialisation?
  • How are visitors and the general public using digital technologies to continue or obstruct memorialisation?

Whilst there is a growing number of publications interested in museums and the digital, the specificity of the memorial museum – usually dedicated to the remembrance of people, cultures and places now destroyed – raises particular concerns relating to preservation, materiality, ethics and absence that require careful consideration in the digital age.

Academics including PhD students, museum researchers, curators, activists and archivists are encouraged to propose an abstract. Ideally, the edited collection aims to include chapters that cover a range of examples from across the world and in relation to a diverse range of genocides, conflicts, histories of slavery and colonialism, and disasters, and hopes to include theoretical pieces as well as discussions about the practices of using digital technologies in memorial museums.

Please send abstracts of 200-350 words with a short bio (no more than 150 words) to v.walden@sussex.ac.uk by March 20th2019. Finished articles would be 6,000-8,000 words in length and ETA delivery time on these will be late August 2019. If you have any queries, do not hesitate to get in contact before the deadline. In the spirit of open access and speaking across disciplines, the manuscript will be published as a free e-book. The proposal has already attracted the interest of an appropriate UK university-based publisher.

Given the e-book format, it may be possible to include video, image or interactive content to which you have the right to publish. Less traditional formats of publication are encouraged and can be discussed with the publisher at the stage of abstract submission. Please note the language of the publication will be English.