Call for Chapters: Learning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries

Call for Book Chapter Proposals

Working titleLearning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries

Proposal submission deadline: January 27th, 2020

Editors: Arianne Hartsell-Gundy (Duke University), Kim Duckett (Duke University), Sarah Morris (University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill)

Publisher: Association of College & Research Libraries

Chapter proposals are invited for Learning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries, a book examining how academic librarians can best support interns, graduate assistants, and practicum and field experience students (both LIS and other fields). We welcome proposals focused on philosophical perspectives, practical strategies, reflective essays, and/or case studies. In addition to contributions from staff working in academic libraries, we welcome contributions from LIS faculty and current and recent graduate students.

Proposals are sought for chapters related to the following themes. Proposals should be between 250-300 words, and final chapters will be between 3000-4000 words.

Preparing Graduate Students for Professional Roles

This section will explore how internships, assistantships, practicums, and field experiences can support the learning of graduate students in order to help readers consider how these programs benefit graduate students and how they might want to structure such learning experience in their institutions. We hope to see explorations of skill-based training and discussions of how to most effectively mentor graduate students through hands-on work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • The role of internships, field experiences, and practicums in LIS or other forms of graduate education
  • Developing professional workplace skills (e.g: time management, project management, workplace communication, reflective practice, self-awareness)
  • Preparing graduate students for the job search – job hunting, applying for professional positions, resume development, interview preparation

Logistics & Structures for Designing Graduate Student Work Experiences

This section will look at how to administer these types of positions and programs in order for readers to gain a bigger picture of what it takes to oversee this work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Strategies for structuring learning experiences for students (either programs or individualized experiences)
  • Interviewing, selecting and/or hiring
  • Developing a diverse and inclusive workforce and environment
  • Onboarding and approaches to training
  • Program assessment

Ethical Considerations

This section will examine the complex ethical issues surrounding these types of graduate experiences in order to help the reader consider how they will address these questions in their work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Issues surrounding paid versus unpaid labor
  • Ensuring students receive credit for their work (e.g. course credit, acknowledgement)
  • Issues related to balancing the organization’s needs and students’ learning and professional development needs

Managers’ Perspectives

This section will address the experience of the managers of these work experiences in order to give both new and seasoned managers insight into what these experiences will mean for them.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Tips for mentoring and coaching
  • The first-time manager perspective
  • Emotional labor, boundaries, and self-care
  • How to make it meaningful for you, your work, and your own professional goals

Students’ Perspectives

This section highlights LIS students’ perspectives on positive and negative aspects of their work experiences, and practical advice for making the most out of their internships, assistantships, etc.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Finding and designing meaningful graduate student work experience(s)
  • Strategies for self-advocacy
  • Perspectives on career-preparedness
  • Navigating workplace dynamics as a temporary employee
  • Balancing work responsibilities with coursework and life experiences

Submission Procedure

Proposals should be submitted as a single email attachment to learninginactionlibraries@gmail.com

Proposals should include:

  • Author name(s), institutional affiliation(s), job title(s)
  • Brief description of your experience as a graduate student or working with graduate students in academic libraries
  • Brief statement of your interests in professional writing
  • Clear description of the topic you are proposing for a potential chapter (about 250-300 words)

Important dates:

Proposals due: January 27th, 2020
Authors notified and sent chapter guidelines: March 15th, 2020
Full chapters due: June 29th, 2020
Final revised chapters due: November 16th, 2020

For additional information contact:

Arianne Hartsell-Gundy, Duke University Libraries: arianne.hartsell.gundy@duke.edu

CFP: Call for Chapter Proposals on Data Literacy

Dear colleagues,

Do you ever help students or faculty with data? Does that work involve helping them to understand:

  • How to find and interpret data?
  • How to be a critical consumer of data?
  • How to be an ethical producer of data?
  • What it means to decolonize data?
  • Why it’s important to document and share research data?
  • Any other form of data literacy?

Then you are invited and encouraged to submit chapter proposals for an upcoming book to be published by ALA Editions, tentatively titled Teaching Critical Thinking with Numbers: Data Literacy and the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Each chapter should be between 4,000 and 6,000 words, and should include a discussion of the ways in which you and/or your colleagues and institution are incorporating data literacy into your work. Possible topics for these case studies could include, but are not limited to, methods for incorporating data literacy into information literacy instruction, experiences promoting data literacy in digital scholarship projects, or strategies for getting community buy-in for data literacy across your institution. If you have any questions about a topic you are considering, you are encouraged to reach out to Julia Bauder (bauderj@grinnell.edu) to discuss it before submitting a full proposal.

To submit a proposal, please e-mail the following to bauderj@grinnell.edu by February 3, 2020:

  • An approximately 400-word summary of the proposed chapter.
  • For each author:
    • Name, institution, and current title.
    • A list of previous publications.
    • If no previous publications, please include or link to a writing sample.

Timeline:

February 3, 2020: Chapter proposals due.
February 21, 2020: Authors notified of acceptance of chapter proposals.
July 1, 2020: Chapter drafts due.
August 14, 2020: Chapter drafts returned to authors for revisions.
October 17, 2020: Chapter revisions due.

Thank you for considering submitting a proposal. Please, if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to me.

Julia Bauder, editor, Teaching Critical Thinking with Numbers: Data Literacy and the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education

Call for Book Chapter Proposals: Learning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries

Call for Book Chapter Proposals

Working titleLearning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries

Proposal submission deadline: January 27th, 2020

Editors: Arianne Hartsell-Gundy (Duke University), Kim Duckett (Duke University), Sarah Morris (University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill)

Publisher: Association of College & Research Libraries

Chapter proposals are invited for Learning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries, a book examining how academic librarians can best support interns, graduate assistants, and practicum and field experience students (both LIS and other fields). We welcome proposals focused on philosophical perspectives, practical strategies, reflective essays, and/or case studies. In addition to contributions from staff working in academic libraries, we welcome contributions from LIS faculty and current and recent graduate students.

Proposals are sought for chapters related to the following themes. Proposals should be between 250-300 words, and final chapters will be between 3000-4000 words.

Preparing Graduate Students for Professional Roles

This section will explore how internships, assistantships, practicums, and field experiences can support the learning of graduate students in order to help readers consider how these programs benefit graduate students and how they might want to structure such learning experience in their institutions. We hope to see explorations of skill-based training and discussions of how to most effectively mentor graduate students through hands-on work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • The role of internships, field experiences, and practicums in LIS or other forms of graduate education
  • Developing professional workplace skills (e.g: “soft skills,” time management, project management, workplace communication, reflective practice, self-awareness)
  • Preparing graduate students for the job search – job hunting, applying for professional positions, resume development, interview preparation

Logistics & Structures for Designing Graduate Student Work Experiences

This section will look at how to administer these types of positions and programs in order for readers to gain a bigger picture of what it takes to oversee this work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Strategies for structuring learning experiences for students (either programs or individualized experiences)
  • Interviewing, selecting and/or hiring
  • Developing a diverse and inclusive workforce and environment
  • Onboarding and approaches to training
  • Program assessment

Ethical Considerations

This section will examine the complex ethical issues surrounding these types of graduate experiences in order to help the reader consider how they will address these questions in their work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Issues surrounding paid versus unpaid labor
  • Ensuring students receive credit for their work (e.g. course credit, acknowledgement)
  • Issues related to balancing the organization’s needs and students’ learning and professional development needs

Managers’ Perspectives

This section will address the experience of the managers of these work experiences in order to give both new and seasoned managers insight into what these experiences will mean for them.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Tips for mentoring and coaching
  • The first-time manager perspective
  • Emotional labor, boundaries, and self-care
  • How to make it meaningful for you, your work, and your own professional goals

Students’ Perspectives

This section highlights LIS students’ perspectives on positive and negative aspects of their work experiences, and practical advice for making the most out of their internships, assistantships, etc.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Finding and designing meaningful graduate student work experience(s)
  • Strategies for self-advocacy
  • Perspectives on career-preparedness
  • Navigating workplace dynamics as a temporary employee
  • Balancing work responsibilities with coursework and life experiences

Submission Procedure

Proposals should be submitted as a single email attachment to learninginactionlibraries@gmail.com

Proposals should include:

  • Author name(s), institutional affiliation(s), job title(s)
  • Brief description of your experience as a graduate student or working with graduate students in academic libraries
  • Brief statement of your interests in professional writing
  • Clear description of the topic you are proposing for a potential chapter (about 250-300 words)

Important dates:

Proposals due: January 27th, 2020
Authors notified and sent chapter guidelines: March 15th, 2020
Full chapters due: June 29th, 2020
Final revised chapters due: November 16th, 2020

For additional information contact:

Arianne Hartsell-Gundy, Duke University Libraries: arianne.hartsell.gundy@duke.edu

CFP: Reorganization of the Library: Investigating the Consequences @LibJuicePress

This call does not specifically mention archives, but is relevant to academic archivists.

_________________________________

Call for Proposals

Reorganization of the Library: Investigating the Consequences
Edited by: Tim Ribaric

Library services are steeped in tradition and are built upon decades of past practice that have shaped the way patrons envision the library. These services also reinforce the mission of the library as a stalwart to the academic mission of the institution. However the library is not immune to change and this is being demonstrated in numerous contemporary library reorganizations that are occurring across academic institutions in North America and beyond. Quite often these exercises involve reorganizing staff and reporting lines in an attempt to find efficiencies and to provide new services. However, these reorganization exercises often create conflicts with established workflows, upend professional trajectories, and sometimes create labour issues. In addition, motivations and precipitating reasons for these exercises are often opaque and not clearly constructed. This work will investigate the current trend of library reorganization exercises, analyze the impacts, and investigate motivated factors.

Suggested Topics Include:

  • Case studies
  • Reorganization frameworks/methodologies
  • Organizational studies perspectives
  • Interrogation of ‘change management’ discourse
  • Bloat in quantity, and purview in administration positions
  • Deprofessionalization
  • Upskilling, changing roles, and continuing education
  • Equity, diversity, and inclusion perspectives
  • The effect of management trends and fads
  • Vocabularies and taxonomies (e.g. use of terminology such as “teams”)
  • Autonomy, professional identity and power-shifts
  • Longitudinal studies of effectiveness and effects
  • Exploration of rhetoric, “fear of change” dialog
  • Comparative studies of techniques and outcomes
  • The transition from liaison/subject librarianship to functional librarianship
  • Modeling library services on ‘market needs’
  • Discussions on neoliberalism in the academy and ramifications to Library services
  • Investigations of what is driving the neoliberal restructuring exercise
  • Strategic grievance filing
  • Self-governance mechanisms utilized in reorganization exercises

Estimated final submission length is between 5000 and 8000 words. The work will be published by Library Juice Press. Interested authors should provide a 500 word abstract to Tim Ribaric <tribaric@brocku.ca> before January 1, 2020. Notice of acceptance February 1. Submissions due: July 1. Anticipated publication date is Fall 2020.

Call for Proposals for The Handbook of Archival Practice

This is your opportunity to contribute to the development of an indispensable guide designed to meet the demands of records and archival professionals increasingly tasked with responsibility for hybrid materials: The Handbook of Archival Practice.

This work—written by experienced practitioners for current and aspiring practitioners—will cover all aspects of contemporary archival practice from records creation control through long-term preservation. Relevant archives- and records-related practices such as digital signatures, social media archiving, content management systems, and cybersecurity measures will be included.

This is NOT a dictionary, glossary, nor encyclopedia. It is a Handbook divided into ten sections—each with multiple topics not only describing activities (such as appraisal, digitization, reference services) but also providing examples of how they are or might be applied in the workplace. Checklists, images, graphics, and other materials are solicited and will be considered for inclusion. The institution at which the practices took place may remain anonymous if desired.

A website, The Handbook of Archival Practice, at https://thapproject.org/ provides additional information about the project, the editor, the distinguished members of the advisory board, and the proposal submission process (with a link to the proposal submission form).

The Survey Monkey submission form is now open to accept your proposals at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/TheHandbookofArchivalPractice. It will remain open throughout the project, which will be submitted to the editor by January 31, 2021.  Successful proposals will be accepted as received and approved for inclusion.  Those who submit early have the best chance of being accepted to write about the topic of their choice.

The editorial advisory board will assist in reviewing the proposals, but the final decisions remain with the editor.

As a thank you, each contributor, regardless of the length or number of entries, will be provided by the publisher, Rowman & Littlefield, with one hard copy of the finished publication, as well as the opportunity to purchase additional copies at 50% off. Each contributor will also be credited in the Handbook.

Questions should be directed to the editor, Dr. Patricia C. Franks, at patricia.franks@sjsu.edu

 

 

 

 

 

New SAA e-publications

New Digital Books Available
Now you can read SAA’s newest books in digital form! Check out:

  • Archival Values: Essays in Honor of Mark A. Greene EPUB PDF
  • Leading and Managing Archives and Manuscripts Programs EPUB PDF
  • Arranging and Describing Archives and Manuscripts EPUB PDF
  • Advocacy and Awareness for Archivists EPUB PDF

In addition, you can now get epub editions of the following titles:

New/Recent Publications: Books

Miscellaneous Order: Manuscript Culture and the Early Modern Organization of Knowledge
Angus Vine
(Oxford University Press, 2019)

Reference Librarianship & Justice: History, Practice & Praxis
Editors: Kate Adler, Ian Beilin, and Eamon Tewell
(Library Juice Press, 2018)

Encyclopedia of Archival Writers, 1515 – 2015
Edited by Luciana Duranti and Patricia C. Franks
(Rowman & Littlefield, 2019)

Miscellaneous Order: Manuscript Culture and the Early Modern Organization of Knowledge
Angus Vine
(Oxford University Press, 2019)

Crowdsourcing our Cultural Heritage
Edited by Mia Ridge
(Routledge, 2017)

Ethics for Records and Information Management
Norman A. Mooradian
(ALA Neal-Shuman, 2018)

Remembering and Forgetting in the Digital Age
Authors: Florent Thouvenin, Peter Hettich, Herbert Burkert, Urs Gasser
(Springer International Publishing, 2018)

The Routledge Handbook of Audiovisual Translation
Edited by Luis Pérez-González
(Routledge, 2018)

The Missing Pages: The Modern Life of a Medieval Manuscript, from Genocide to Justice
Heghnar Zeitlian Watenpaugh
(Stanford University Press, 2019)

Leadership Matters: Leading Museums in an Age of Discord 2nd Edition
Anne W. Ackerson, Joan H. Baldwin
(American Association for State and Local History, 2019)

Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts: The St. Chad Gospels, Materiality, Recoveries, and Representation in 2D & 3D
Bill Endries
(ARC Humanities Press, 2019)

Archives
Andrew Lison, Tomislav Medak, Marcell Mars, Rick Prelinger
(Open access from Meson Press; available for purchase from The University of Minnesota Press)

Retroactivism in the Lesbian Archives: Composing Pasts and Futures
Jean Bessette
(Southern Illinois University Press, 2017)