SAA Bookstore: New Epubs Available

7 New Epubs Available in the SAA Bookstore
Prefer digital to print? Now you can read SAA’s latest releases in epub and PDF formats! Putting Descriptive Standards to Work, edited by Kris Kiesling and Christopher J. Prom, is the most recent book in the Trends in Archives Practice series. Buy the entire volume (epub PDF) or purchase Modules 17–20 individually:

  • MODULE 17: Implementing DACS: A Guide to the Archival Content Standard by Cory Nimer (epub PDF);
  • MODULE 18: Using EAD by Kelcy Shepherd (epub | PDF);
  • MODULE 19: Introducing EAC-CPF by Katherine M. Wisser (epub PDF);
  • MODULE 20: Sharing Archival Metadata by Aaron Rubinstein (epub PDF).

Also available is Moving Image and Sound Collections for Archivists by Anthony Cocciolo (epub PDF) as well as Privacy and Confidentiality Perspectives: Archivists and Archival Records, edited by Menzi L. Behrnd-Klodt and Peter J. Wosh (epub PDF).

Call for Chapter Proposals: Borders & belonging: Critical examinations of LIS approaches toward immigrants

This call does not specify archives and is geared towards libraries, but there may be potential crossover.

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Call for Chapter Proposals:
Borders & belonging: Critical examinations of LIS approaches toward immigrants

Book Editor: Ana Ndumu
Publisher: Library Juice Press
Series: Critical Race Studies and Multiculturalism in LIS
Series Editors: Annie Pho and Rose L. Chou

Borders & belonging: Critical examinations of LIS approaches toward immigrants is a response to the need for discourse on how the LIS field, particularly in North America, is shaped by longstanding ideologies on nativity, race, ethnicity, language, class, and “belonging.” The goal is to probe concrete aspects of the LIS field (e.g., workforce, programs, facilities, resources, education and publications) and shed light on ethnocentric and essentialist frameworks. Here, an immigrant is defined as a person who permanently lives in but was born outside of the U.S. or Canada and respective territories. An immigrant is either a refugee, asylee, legal permanent resident, naturalized citizen or undocumented person. Please consult the editor about ideas involving international students.

Works should critically examine the role of immigration policy along with sociocultural paradigms in the library-immigrant relationship. Prospective authors are encouraged to refer to Mignolo & Walsh’s1 On Decoloniality: Concepts, Analytics, Praxis along with Caidi, Allard, and Quirke’s2 Information practices of immigrants to develop their contributions.

Below is a sample, not exhaustive, list of topics:
• libraries and the promotion of assimilation or westernization
• linkages between libraries and colonialism and/or imperialism
• the role of libraries and information in mass migration and globalization
• immigrant self-determination versus structural inequality
• immigrant pre-migration information behavior
• immigrant contributions to information innovations (e.g., Silicon Valley, H-1B visa)
• presumptions of immigrant information incompetence and/or digital divides
• libraries and model minority narratives
• libraries and liberation rhetoric in the immigrant context
• libraries in sanctuary cities/states
• libraries in immigration detention centers
• libraries, privacy and the USA PATRIOT Act
• library services to specific immigrant groups (i.e., DACA recipients, TPS holders, religious minorities, forcefully displaced groups)
• nativism, populism, or xenophobia in libraries
• historical aspects of library services to immigrants
• gaps in immigrant information behavior research
• immigrants in the LIS workforce

Invited authors will complete 3,000 to 6,000 word chapters. LIS affiliates (LIS professionals, paraprofessionals, students and faculty) in the U.S. and Canada are encouraged to propose chapters. Chapters may be conceptual or empirical, exploratory or explanatory. All research methods are welcome. Case studies and literature reviews must draw from both migration/population studies and LIS literature. No previously submitted or published material.

Submissions:
Please email a 300-500 word proposal to Ana Ndumu at andumu@umd.edu by December 15, 2018. Proposals should include:
• Anticipated title
• Chapter rationale
• Brief outline
• Author(s) bio(s)

About Library Juice Press:
Library Juice Press, an imprint of Litwin Books, LLC, specializes in theoretical and practical issues in librarianship from a critical perspective, for an audience of professional librarians and students of library science. Topics include library philosophy, information policy, library activism, and in general anything that can be placed under the rubric of “critical studies in librarianship.”

About the Series:
The Critical Race Studies and Multiculturalism in LIS series collects and publishes works from theoretical, practical and personal perspectives that critically engage issues of race, ethnicity, cultural diversity and equity in library and information science (LIS). Works published in this series include:
Pushing the Margins: Women of Color and Intersectionality in LIS, edited by Rose L. Chou and Annie Pho
Topographies of Whiteness: Mapping Whiteness in Library and Information Science, edited by Gina Schlesselman-Tarango
Teaching for Justice: Implementing Social Justice in the LIS Classroom, edited by Nicole A. Cooke and Miriam E. Sweeney

About the Editor:
Ana Ndumu is a researcher at the University of Maryland (UMD), College Park’s College of Information. She earned a Ph.D. in Information at Florida State University´s School of Information and explores the intersection of libraries, information and demography. She has completed studies on Black immigrants’ ICT device and Internet access; Black immigrants’ information behavior and experiences with information overload; the development of a scale for measuring and examining information overload as immigrant acculturative stress; and critical discourse analysis on LIS literature involving immigrants. Ana is a UMD President’s Postdoctoral Fellow and Digital Library Federation (DLF) Futures Fellow.

1. Mignolo, Walter, and Catherine E Walsh. On Decoloniality: Concepts, Analytics, and Praxis. Durham: Duke University Press, 2018.
2. Caidi, Nadia, Danielle Allard, and Lisa Quirke. “Information practices of immigrants.” Annual review of information science and technology 44, no. 1 (2010): 491-531.

CFP: Rethinking The Collector and the Collected: Perspectives on Decolonizing Area Studies Librarianship

This call is for academic librarians, and though it doesn’t specifically mention archives, the topic is relevant.

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Library Juice Press

We are inviting chapter proposals for the upcoming Library Juice Press publication tentatively titled Rethinking The Collector and the Collected: Perspectives on Decolonizing Area Studies Librarianship. This volume will explore the paradigm of “area studies” — a way of supporting regionally-focused collecting, processing, and liaison work — in the academic library through an explicitly anti-colonial lens. We will center debates on the politics and problems of area studies in libraries. Specifically, we ask how libraries are rethinking their approaches to collecting global resources and serving our constituencies in a contemporary and progressive manner. While libraries need to address the problematic nature of area studies, we see a larger academic trend in the push for “global” initiatives which ignore historically, linguistically, and culturally significant sites of difference, inequity, and asymmetrical power relations.

What does it mean to break down the artificial divide between “collectors” of knowledge and those of us who have these knowledges “collected” for use? What work is required to decolonize collections, collecting practices, and practices of access originally designed to help Euro-American scholars study “the other?”

Possible focuses for chapters include, but are not limited to:
– negotiating areas: the politics and history of delineating regions, places, and spaces;
– interdisciplinarity: exploring boundaries and relationships among academic disciplines and other interdisciplinary subjects such as women and gender studies, LGBT or queer studies, or environmental studies;
– funding and neoliberal history: looking at the relationship to governments, private funding, private capital, and the support of imperial and capitalist projects;
– collection development, acquisitions, and access: examining historical and current practices of acquiring materials and denying, limiting, or expanding the use of these materials through copyright, paywalls, or open access regimes;
– identity, professionalism, and training for library workers: centering the lived experiences of library workers, particularly librarians abroad, immigrants, and individuals from diaspora communities.

Accepted essays will offer a nuanced critique with solutions that go well beyond an erasure of difference. We are especially interested in soliciting chapters from writers of color, indigenous writers, or scholars from outside of the U.S. We also invite new translations of previously published work currently unavailable in English. Further, we invite work which operates from the assumption that hegemonic areas should be studied using the same tools, theories, and approaches as non-hegemonic areas — much like the precedents of whiteness studies and masculinity studies. Lastly, we plan to integrate peer review among authors into our process in addition to editorial review and ask that potential authors be willing to provide feedback on at least one fellow author’s material during the editing process.

Proposals should be no more than 300 words and describe the chapter, the framing and structure of the chapter and/or any theoretical frames necessary to the piece. Further, please indicate if the chapter would fit into any of the above focuses. If proposed work is a translation, please indicate if you are the original author or have the original author’s permission and provide the citation for the original. Please send proposal as a .docx attachment and in the body of the e-mail along with your CV and a short biography. Our deadline for proposals is December 15, 2018.

Please e-mail the editors at DecolonizingAreaStudies@gmail.com with any questions about the book including procedural questions or to ask about potential fit for your proposal.

New/Recent Publications: Books

We Can Do I.T.: Women in Library Information Technology
Editors: Jenny Brandon, Sharon Ladenson, and Kelly Sattler
(Library Juice, 2018)

Metadata for Information Management and Retrieval: Understanding metadata and its use
David Haynes
(Facet Publishing, 2018)

Social Tagging in a Linked Data Environment: A new approach to discovering information online
Edited by Diane Pennington and Louise Spiteri
(Facet Publishing, 2018)

Foundations of Information Ethics
Edited by John T.F. Burgess and Emily J.M. Knox
(Facet Publishing, 2018)

Digital Archives: Management, access and use
Edited by Milena Dobreva
(Facet Publishing, 2018)

The No-nonsense Guide to Born Digital Content
Heather Ryan
(Facet Publishing, 2018)

Records and Information Management, 2nd edition
Patricia C. Franks
(Facet Publishing, 2018)

Oral History in Your Library: Create Shelf Space for Community Voice
by Cyns Nelson with contributions by Adam Speirs
(Libraries Unlimited, 2018)

The Future of Literary Archives: Diasporic and Dispersed Collections at Risk
(ARC Humanities Press, 2018)

Comics Memory: Archives and Styles
Editors: Maaheen Ahmed, Benoît Crucifix
(Palgrave, 2018)

Call for Authors: Monograph about Digital Image Collections

Primary Research Group, www.Primaryresearch.com, is seeking a librarian/author
to write a monograph of approximately 10,000 words on how academic libraries
are managing major digital image collections.  The collections may be medical/
scientific, artistic, historical, data visualizations or any other kind of
image collection.  The author will profile the efforts of 4 organizations,
predominantly but not exclusively research universities, focusing on issues
such as: image housing and processing software and applications, internal
search engines, access, metadata,  preservation, copyright, use restrictions &
security, use in education and scholarship, marketing and distribution,
relations with institutional digital repositories and if applicable, sales and
licensing of the images. The author will have considerable scope to shape the
interviews as he or she sees fit. In addition to the profiles, the author will
conduct a literature search and augment the findings in the profiles with
insights from the existing literature. This is a compensated assignment.  To
inquire or apply, send cover letter and resume to jmoses@primaryresearch.com.

CFP: The Ideabook of Positive Change in the Library Workplace

This does not specifically mention archives, but the issues are pertinent and applicable.

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Call for papers and essays

http://bit.ly/2NZ7NMQ

Working Title: The Ideabook of Positive Change in the Library Workplace
Editors: Heather Seibert, Amanda Vinogradov, Amanda H. McLellan – East Carolina University, Joyner Library.
Deadline for drafts: September 5, 2018
Publisher: American Library Association Press (ALA Press)
Submission Form: https://goo.gl/forms/wny3vqnKvRRsLVxz1

We are soliciting a diverse range of essays and narratives from practicing U.S. academic, public and special libraries staff, for inclusion in a curated anthology that empowers library employees to change real-world issues pertaining to library staff. Submissions may include any phase of project development, but we are especially seeking: perspectives and advice on how to make and implement change, how to talk to administration about needs, the specific steps taken in the process, solutions to roadblocks and recognition of the future needs of staff. We also seek narratives, steps and ideas from administrators on how to implement and create a positive work environment and the challenges faced in this process.  Paraprofessional staff and first-time authors are encouraged to apply.

Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Lactation accommodation
  • Flexible scheduling
  • Development of policies and procedures allowing remote work (i.e. weather related absences for employees with leave time deficits)
  • Childcare accommodations
  • Changing tables in restrooms
  • Parental leave policies
  • Space and time for dialysis or other medical needs
  • Standing desks
  • Promotion of exercise at work
  • Inclusive ideas for work outings, gatherings or meetings
  • Veterans on active duty or return from duty
  • Race and ethnicity inclusion and sensitivity
  • Gender neutral bathrooms
  • Dealing with bias
  • Providing space for prayer and/or meditation
  • Inclusive recruitment practices
  • Updating policies to be more inclusive
  • Development of policies and space for employees with varying sensory needs (Autism spectrum, PTSD, etc)
  • Case studies of libraries that have successfully handled difficult situations regarding discrimination or harassment.
  • Employees returning to school for further education

Timeline

Deadline for Draft Submission: September 5, 2018
Notification/Feedback regarding submission: October 10, 2018
Final submission for accepted drafts: Jan. 12, 2019

Submissions:

*This anthology will contain commentary, narratives and experiences.  Drafts accepted must be between four to six pages double spaced (about 350 words per page).  A suggested template will be provided for all accepted submissions to the anthology.

*Materials cannot be previously published or simultaneously submitted.

*All photos, illustrations, graphs etc. must have a Creative Commons License or be in the public domain. The submission’s author is responsible for verifying that these materials fall under the respected licenses. Each will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis and will be at the discretion of the editors for inclusion.

*If your submission is tentatively accepted, we may request modifications.

*Accepted contributors should expect to sign a release form in order to be published, and will agree to follow submission guidelines.

We STRONGLY encourage submission from all regardless of classification of positions within academic and public libraries. We are seeking input from administrators, faculty, as well as staff employees.

Submission Formhttps://goo.gl/forms/wny3vqnKvRRsLVxz1

Thank you

Heather Seibert, Amanda Vinogradov & Amanda H. McLellan

CFP: ‘Migrants and Monuments: Public Memory in the Context of Transnational Migration and Displacement’

Call for Papers: Proposed edited volume for Palgrave Macmillan Memory Studies series

‘Migrants and Monuments: Public Memory in the Context of Transnational Migration and Displacement’

by Sabine Marschall

The growing global presence of migrants, refugees and diasporic communities has widely been documented to impact on host societies and environments in multifarious ways, but public memory markers constitute a neglected dimension of research in the field. This proposed edited collection will explore transnational migrants as audience and agents in the field of public commemoration. As subaltern groups, migrants constitute new audiences for old monuments and commemorative markers in host country societies, while some migrants and diasporic communities erect their own formal and informal monuments, memorials, statues and plaques in their adopted countries of residence, inscribing their presence and values in public spaces, either in cooperation with or in defiance of local authorities and host society communities.

This interdisciplinary collection seeks contributions from scholars in anthropology, art and architectural history, cultural geography, cultural studies, diaspora studies, history, memory studies, migration studies, mobility studies, peace and transitional justice studies, political science, sociology and other relevant fields. Chapter authors may explore how migrants, refugees and members of diaspora develop their own relationship with the landscape of memory in their new place of residence. This may include

  • appropriation and affirmative embrace of selected statues and memorials as symbolic and spatial focal points of community;
  • contestation and informal ethnic re-interpretation of specific monuments;
  • competition between migrant groups over meaning and claims to selective pasts enshrined in commemorative markers;
  • discontent over issues of representation, ideology, location or aesthetic design in the context of migration;
  • protests and monument defacements by migrants or targeted at migrants;
  • official re-configurations of statues and memorials by local authorities and host society agencies due to migration.
  • Where migrants as carriers of memory actively participate in erecting their own commemorative markers, contributors may investigate how content and meaning, location and visual manifestation are negotiated within the minority community and with the host society;
  • how such markers are publicly received, represented and ‘used’;
  • how informal, transient counter-memorials or vernacular memory markers and even digital online memorials can inflect the meaning of established memory landscapes in host country contexts;
  • what migrants intend or manage to achieve through engagement in official, vernacular or clandestine public commemorative practice.
  • planned, but not materialized monuments erected for or by migrants and refugees can be included.

These are some, but not the only potential topics of investigation. The proposed book endeavors to feature a variety of case studies from diverse geographical and societal contexts, both historical and contemporary. Contributions should be based on empirical or discursive research and draw on appropriate disciplinary-based theoretical frameworks in combination with concepts developed in the field of Memory Studies, such as national and transnational memory; transcultural and ‘travelling memory’ (Erll); memory work; memory activism; or the cross-border circulation and public staging of memory.

Before developing a formal chapter proposal, please first contact Prof Sabine Marschall at marschalls@ukzn.ac.za with an informal expression of interest and further guidance. Deadline for expressions of interest: 31 August 2018.