New/Recent Publications

Articles

The Postwar American Poet’s Library: An Archival Consideration with Charles Olson and the Maud/Olson Library,” Book History Vol. 23 (2020)
Mary Catherine Kinniburgh

The Page Image: Towards a Visual History of Digital Documents,” Book History Vol. 23 (2020)
Andrew Piper, Chad Wellmon, and Mohamed Cheriet

“The Bane of a Music Librarian’s Existence”: Why and How Music Libraries Preserve Scores with Spiral and Comb BindingsMusic Reference Services Quarterly
Peter Shirts

Identifying VOCs in exhibition cases and efflorescence on museum objects exhibited at Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian-New York,” Heritage Science 8:115 (2020)
Alba Alvarez-Martin, John George, Emily Kaplan, Lauren Osmond, Leah Bright, G. Asher Newsome, Rebecca Kaczkowski, Frederik Vanmeert, Gwénaëlle Kavich and Susan Heald

Evaluation of metadata describing topographic maps in a National Library,” Heritage Science 8:113 (2020)
Marta Kuźma and Albina Mościcka

Documenting Digital Projects: Instituting Guidelines for Digital Dissertations and Theses in the Humanities,” College & Research Libraries Vol. 81 no. 7 (2020)
Roxanne Shirazi and Stephen Zweibel

Liberating digital collections: Rights review of digital collections at the Ohio State University Libraries,” College & Research Libraries Vol. 81 no. 10 (2020)
Sandra Aya Enimil

Books

The Library Outreach Cookbook
Ryan L. SittlerTerra, J. Rogerson
(American Library Association, 2020)

Copyright’s Highway: From the Printing Press to the Cloud, Second Edition
Paul Goldstein
(Stanford University Press, 2019)

Other

Structuring Collaborations: The Opportunities and Challenges of Building Relationships Between Academic Museums and Libraries
Liam Sweeney
(Ithaka S+R, 2020)

Podcasts

S4.7: Ferrin Evans : Queer Loss, Marginalized Experiences and Demanding a Seat at the Table
Archivist’s Alley

New Podcast: Rose Library Presents, Emory University

#56 Engineering Empathy: Building Innovative Access Systems and Preserving Video Testimony with Sam Gustman, CTO and Associate Dean at USC Shoah Foundation and USC Libraries
The Workflow Show

Case Studies

New Case Study on Access Policies for Native American Archival Materials
Case 3: Access Policies for Native American Archival Materials in the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
 by Diana E. Marsh, Robert Leopold, Katherine Crowe, and Katherine S. Madison is the latest addition to SAA’s open access case studies series on Access Policies for Native American Archival Materials. This case examines the policies and practices of the National Anthropological Archives at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History over a fifty-year period. It describes a series of archival programs and projects that occurred before, during, and after the development of the Protocols for Native American Archival Materials in order to view changes in the archives’ access policies within a broader cultural and institutional milieu. The case study assesses the influence of the Protocols as well as some challenges to the adoption of several recommendations and makes several proposals for archival repositories with comparable collections and constituencies. The case studies series is sponsored by the Native American Archives Section.

Call for Chapters: Contemporary Issues in Information and Records Management in the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Editors
Josiline Chigwada, Bindura University of Science Education, Zimbabwe
Godfrey Tsvuura, Zimbabwe Open University, Zimbabwe

Call for Chapters
Proposals Submission Deadline: December 12, 2020
Full Chapters Due: February 24, 2021
Submission Date: February 24, 2021

Introduction
The book showcases contemporary issues in information and records management in the 4th industrial revolution especially in times of crisis like the recent COVID-19 pandemic. Chapters highlighting innovation, use of information and communication technology in information and records management, best practices, challenges encountered and how they are overcome are discussed.

Objective
The publication demonstrates the value of information and records management in the 21st century vis-à-vis the challenges that may be faced by information and records managers in the 4th industrial revolution. The book provides a summary of the key activities undertaken by information and records managers as they seek to make records and information management more visible to modern knowledge-driven society.

Target Audience
The target audience of this book will be composed of professionals, librarians, archivists, students, lecturers and researchers working in the field of library and information science, archives and records management, communication sciences, education, and information technology.

Recommended Topics
• Records management practices and systems • Challenges in managing records in the 21st century • Information management in the 4th industrial revolution • Knowledge management in the 4th industrial revolution • Quality assurance in information and records management • Research data management • Data, information and records • Big data • Open Science (Open access, open educational resources, open source, open methodology, Open peer review). • Digitisation of records • Continuous professional development • Social Media usage in records and information management • Managing difficult patrons • Inclusive librarianship • Cloud Computing • Services to Patrons with disabilities • Collection development and management • Institutional repositories • Community engagement • Cooperation between librarians and teaching staff • Information Communication Technology issues in information and records management • Resource sharing in information and records centres

Submission Procedure
Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit on or before December 12, 2020, a chapter proposal of 1,000 to 2,000 words clearly explaining the mission and concerns of his or her proposed chapter. Authors will be notified by December 26, 2020 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines.Full chapters are expected to be submitted by February 24, 2021, and all interested authors must consult the guidelines for manuscript submissions at https://www.igi-global.com/publish/contributor-resources/before-you-write/ prior to submission. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project.

Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted to this book publication, Contemporary Issues in Information and Records Management in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer review editorial process.

All proposals should be submitted through the eEditorial Discovery® online submission manager.

Publisher
This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), an international academic publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business Science Reference,” and “Engineering Science Reference” imprints. IGI Global specializes in publishing reference books, scholarly journals, and electronic databases featuring academic research on a variety of innovative topic areas including, but not limited to, education, social science, medicine and healthcare, business and management, information science and technology, engineering, public administration, library and information science, media and communication studies, and environmental science. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit https://www.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2021.

Important Dates
December 12, 2020: Proposal Submission Deadline
December 26, 2020: Notification of Acceptance
February 24, 2021: Full Chapter Submission
April 9, 2021: Review Results Returned
May 21, 2021: Final Acceptance Notification
June 4, 2021: Final Chapter Submission

Inquiries
Josiline Chigwada Bindura University of Science Education josyphiri@gmail.com +263733782906 Godfrey Tsvuura Zimbabwe Open University gtsvuura@gmail.com

Full call and submission

Call for Chapters: Exploring Inclusive & Equitable Pedagogies: Creating Space for All Learners

Call for Chapters: Exploring Inclusive & Equitable Pedagogies: Creating Space for All Learners
Published by ACRL Press

CFP link: http://bit.ly/CFP_ACRLinclusivepedbook

Chapter Proposals due: January 15, 2021 **

About the Book

We seek to deepen our understanding of equitable and inclusive theories and practices in order to provide instructors with new grounding for both their individual teaching and their instruction program. Some of the questions we seek to address in this publication include: How do theories and practices related to equitable and inclusive pedagogies inspire your teaching? How have librarians engaged in equitable and inclusive teaching? How might librarians implement equitable and inclusive pedagogy in ways specific to library instruction?

Taking an inclusive approach to content, chapters will take a variety of formats such as: reflective and personal essays, narratives, analytical and academic essays, case studies, autoethnographies, lesson plans, or zines and other graphic formats. You can share your ideas for your own teaching or take a more programmatic approach. Submissions may reflect the range of instructional activities and settings with which academic library educators engage: special collections, data management, information literacy, digital scholarship, open education, and others, across the many different types of academic libraries. We encourage submissions from institutions that are underrepresented in information literacy literature, such as community colleges and minority-serving institutions.

Our book is unique in that it will share a range of theories related to equitable and inclusive pedagogies while also featuring examples of inclusive teaching in action. Academic library educators will gain both the theoretical foundations and practical applications to adopt more inclusive teaching practices. 

Submission Procedure

Please submit an initial chapter proposal description of up to 500 words and a tentative chapter title. The proposal form also asks you to include your approach (e.g., reflective essay on a theoretical approach, case study about data skills workshops) and a description of the content you will include in your chapter. Additional fields include: the author(s)’ names, titles, and institutional affiliations.

Please submit proposals to: Google Form 

Publication Timeline

Proposals are due by January 15, 2021**

Authors will be notified of their status (accept or decline) by February 15, 2021

A first draft of approximately 2000-5000 words (excluding endnotes and bibliography) will be due on May 15, 2021

After receiving editorial feedback, a final draft will be due on August 30, 2021.

Chapters must not be previously published or simultaneously submitted elsewhere.

**Special note – We acknowledge the nature of the difficult times we are living in means schedules can be unpredictable. If you have an idea though are unsure of your schedule, please reach out to one of the editors to express your interest and share your idea. We can see what can be figured out.**

Anticipated book publication is 2022. Chapter authors will be able to make their chapters open access by posting final copies of their chapter in their institutional repositories.

For questions or to request additional information, please email: inclusivepedagogiesbook@gmail.com 

Co-editors:

Jane Nichols, Oregon State University
Melissa Mallon, Vanderbilt University
Elizabeth Foster, University of Chicago
Ariana Santiago, University of Houston
Maura Seale, University of Michigan
Robin Brown, Borough of Manhattan Community College

New/Recent Publications

Books

Engagement in the Digital Era
Edited by Nicole J. Milano and Christopher J. Prom; featuring modules by Michele Casto, Dina Kellams, Jessica Lacher-Feldman, Nicole J. Milano, Daniel J. Linke, Jennie Thomas, and Travis H. Williams
(Society of American Archivists, 2020)

Who Owns the News?: A History of Copyright
Will Slauter
(Stanford University Press, 2019)

The Color of Creatorship: Intellectual Property, Race, and the Making of Americans
Anjali Vats
(Stanford University Press, 2020)

Archive Wars: The Politics of History in Saudi Arabia
Rosie Bsheer
(Stanford University Press, 2020)

The Public Domain Review: Selected Essays, Vol. VII
(2020)

Reflections on Practitioner Research: A Practical Guide for Information Professionals
Lee Ann Fullington, Brandon K. West, Frans Albarillo
(ACRL, 2020)

Libraries, Archives, and Museums Today: Insights from the Field
Peter Botticelli, Michèle V. Cloonan, Martha R. Mahard
(Rowman & Littlefield, 2019)

Saving Your Digital Past, Present, and Future: A Step-by-Step Guide
Vanessa Reyes
(Rowman & Littlefield, 2020)

Encyclopedia of Archival Writers, 1515 – 2015
Edited by Luciana Duranti and Patricia C. Franks
(Rowman & Littlefield, 2020)

The Preservation Management Handbook: A 21st-Century Guide for Libraries, Archives, and Museums, Second Edition
Revised by Donia Conn, Ross Harvey, and Martha R. Mahard
(Rowman & Littlefield, 2020)

Archival Basics: A Practical Manual for Working with Historical Collections
Charlie Arp
(Rowman & Littlefield, 2020)

Articles

“Mass Print, Clipping Bureaus, and the Pre-Digital Database: Reexamining Marianne Moore’s Collage Poetics through the Archives,” Journal of Modern Literature Volume 43, Number 1, Fall 2019
Alison Fraser

Reports

Social Interoperability in Research Support: Cross-Campus Partnerships and the University Research Enterprise
by Rebecca Bryant, Annette Dortmund, and Brian Lavoie
(OCLC, 2020)

Case Studies

Engaging History Majors in Intensive Archival Research: Assessing Scaffolded Curricula for Teaching Undergraduates Primary Source Literacy Skills

Teaching with Primary Sources Remotely

Rethinking Record Groups and University Archives Classification at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Podcasts

Pearl Jam: It’s a Rock Band, Not The Smithsonian
The Kitchen Sisters

Newsletters

Ohio Archivist, Fall 2020

Archivists and Archives of Color, Summer 2020

CFP for Trans and Gender Diverse Voices in LIS

Call for chapter proposals

Working title: Trans and Gender Diverse Voices in LIS

Editors: Kalani Adolpho, Stephen G. Krueger, Krista McCracken

Submission deadline: December 18, 2020

Publisher: Library Juice Press, Series on Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies

Overview

Currently there are very few books that contain any content on trans and gender diverse* experiences within library and information science (LIS). Trans and Gender Diverse Voices in LIS will center the lived experiences of trans and gender diverse people in LIS work and education. All authors and editors will be self-identified trans and gender diverse people.

The editors invite submissions from anyone who identifies as trans and/or gender diverse and who works in, teaches, and/or studies library and information science, or has done so in the past, with the goal of representing a wide range of experiences and identities in the final collection.

*We use “trans and gender diverse” to describe any self-identified non-cisgender identities, including nonbinary, agender, genderfluid, genderqueer, and others, as well as genders that do not fall within the Western system, such as two spirit, māhū, and others.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Positive experiences with trans and gender diverse inclusion in LIS education and/or the workplace
  • Negative experiences with trans and gender diverse exclusion in LIS education and/or the workplace
  • Trans and gender diverse experiences during LIS education
  • Experiences outside of the cis/trans Western gender binary (e.g. two spirit, māhū, etc.)
  • The intersection of being trans or gender diverse with other identities in LIS work and study (including, but not limited to: race, ethnicity, disability, sexual and romantic orientation, mental health, religion, and socioeconomic status)
  • Transitioning and/or coming out in the workplace or as an LIS student
  • Navigating and performing gender, possibly in combination with other identities, and ideas about professionalism
  • Being the first/only out trans or gender diverse person in your workplace or LIS program
  • Experiences with changes over time in how the LIS field treats trans and gender diverse people
  • Navigating the workplace or educational environment as a trans or gender diverse person who is not out in those spaces
  • Navigating interviewing, hiring, and/or onboarding as a trans or gender diverse library worker
  • Navigating library systems and other structures (eg. library accounts, learning platforms, HR systems, etc.) as a trans or gender diverse library worker or student
  • Anything else about the personal experiences of trans or gender diverse LIS workers, educators, and students

Authors and Anonymity

We are fully aware that many trans and gender diverse people may not be able to comfortably or safely share their experiences with their name attached. Any authors may use a pseudonym or have their chapters published anonymously. The editors will communicate with all authors to ensure that nobody has information shared that they would prefer not to.

Proposals with multiple authors are welcome.

Tentative Timeline

  • Abstract submission deadline: December 18, 2020
  • Information session: October 6, 2020 at 3:00-4:00pm EST
  • Notification/Feedback regarding submission: February 19, 2021
  • First drafts due: June 18, 2021
  • Final drafts due: September 17, 2021
  • Final manuscript due to publisher: January 1, 2022

Submissions

Please use this form to submit proposals. Note that acceptance of a proposal does not guarantee inclusion in the final book.

Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and include a short biographical statement. You are welcome to submit multiple abstracts about different possible topics. Material cannot be previously published. Final chapters should be in the 1,000 to 5,000 word range.

For those interested in submitting a proposal, or learning more about the book, the editors will be holding an information session October 6, 2020 at 3pm EST to answer questions. Register for the session using this form.

Any questions can be directed to trans.voices.LIS@gmail.com or to any of the editors.

About the editors

  • Kalani Adolpho (they/them) is a queer, trans, non-binary, and hapa (Kanaka Maoli and white) archivist. They are the Processing Archivist for Manuscripts and Archives Management at University of Miami Libraries. Kalani has presented on trans and gender diverse inclusion in libraries, diversity residencies, and colonialism in cataloging. Kalani can be contacted at kalani.adolpho@miami.edu.
  • Stephen Krueger (he/him or they/them) is the Scholarly Publishing Librarian at Dartmouth College. He has written and presented extensively on trans inclusion in libraries, including the book Supporting Trans People in Libraries and the webinar Supporting Trans Library Employees (see full details at https://www.stephengkrueger.com/scholarly-work). Stephen is the founding member of the Gender Variant LIS Network. Contact Stephen at Stephen.G.Krueger@dartmouth.edu.
  • Krista McCracken (they/them) is a queer non-binary archivist and public historian. They work as the Researcher/Curator for the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre and Arthur A. Wishart Library at Algoma University. Their work focuses on community archives, access and outreach. Krista can be reached at krista.mccracken@gmail.com.

Call for Chapter Proposals: Innovation and Experiential Learning in Academic Libraries Meeting the Needs of 21st Century Students

This call does not specifically mention archives, but is potentially related to academic archivists.

_________________________________

Innovation and Experiential Learning in Academic Libraries
Meeting the Needs of 21st Century Students

Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group
Series: Innovations in Information Literacy
Editors: Sarah Nagle and Elias Tzoc

As technology advances and the skills required for the future workforce continue to change rapidly, academic libraries have begun to expand the definition of information literacy and the type of library services they provide to better prepare students for the constantly-developing world they will face upon graduation. More than teaching the newest technologies, information literacy is expanding to help students develop enduring skills such as critical thinking, creativity, problem solving, communication, teamwork, and more. Innovation and Experiential Learning in Academic Libraries: Meeting the Needs of 21st Century Students addresses the multitude of ways that academic librarians are collaborating with faculty and helping students develop these enduring skills by developing and integrating active and experiential learning approaches into teaching activities.

We plan to organize 8-10 chapters (from a multidisciplinary group of authors) into three main sections:

  • Section I – Innovation and Leadership: in times of unprecedented changes and transformations, library leaders must plan, advocate and implement innovative services that support effective learning and teaching environments for all disciplines.

  • Section II – Examples and Case Studies: academic librarianship is a field of practice where librarians and information professionals are actively involved in creating programs and services that meet the dynamic and ever-changing needs of students and faculty.

  • Section III – Future Literacy Developments: as the world continues to change, because of new technologies or global crisis, the academic library community must also continue to change/create innovative literacy services that will contribute to student success.

Chapters will be 15-20 pages (5,000 – 7,000 words and will include 1-2 figures, tables, or images) each.

Chapter proposal topics may include, but are not limited to:
Section I: Innovation and Leadership

  • Leading teams focused on new/innovative instructional techniques and technologies

  • Campus-library partnerships for innovative initiatives

  • Examples and best practices for working with faculty to incorporate new literacies/experiential learning into curricula

  • Challenging the status quo at your institution

  • Championing innovative efforts

Section II: Examples and Case Studies of Literacy efforts in

  • Digital humanities

  • Data literacy

  • Digital scholarship

  • Active/experiential learning in information literacy

  • Maker/creation literacy

  • Design thinking/entrepreneurial thinking

Section III: Future Literacy Developments

  • Emerging Literacy Services in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

  • Information Literacy and Academic Library Innovation in a Post-COVID World

We seek chapter proposals that can provide crucial guidance for administrators and information literacy practitioners on implementing various new and innovative literacies into their instruction.

Chapter submissions deadline: November 15th, 2020
Decision on chapters proposals: December 15th, 2020
Full chapters deadline: May 15th, 2021

Linked Data for the Perplexed Librarian: Q&A With the Authors (Free)

Join the Linked Data Users Group for a discussion of linked data with authors Cory Lampert, Darnelle Melvin, and Anne Washington

About this Event

Linked Data Users Group: All Users Group Meeting
October 15, 2020, 1:00-2:00pm EDT
Linked Data for the Perplexed Librarian: Q&A with the Authors

Linked data is already happening right now, evident in projects from Big Tech and the Wikimedia Foundation as well as the Web pages of library service platforms. The goal of exposing cultural institutions’ records to the Web is as important as ever—but for the non-technically minded, linked data can feel like a confusing morass of abstraction, jargon, and acronyms. Get conversant with Linked Data for the Perplexed Librarian, published by ALA Editions in collaboration with the Association of Library Collections and Technical Services (ALCTS).

Join the Linked Data Users Group for a discussion of linked data with Linked Data for the Perplexed Librarian authors Cory Lampert, Darnelle Melvin, and Anne Washington.

Do you have questions about current and future uses of linked data in libraries? Do you find the whole concept of Linked Data perplexing? Join us for this hour-long virtual Q&A/discussion and bring your questions.

About the Authors of Linked Data for the Perplexed Librarian

Cory Lampert is a Professor and the Head of Digital Collections at the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) Libraries. She is responsible for operations and strategic planning for a dynamic department that comprises digitization facilities, metadata creation, and online delivery of digital collections. Her research interests focus on digital library best practices and linked open data for libraries, archives, and cultural heritage organizations. She is a co-author of the book Linked Data for the Perplexed Librarian. She received a B.A. from Sarah Lawrence College in 1995 and a MLIS from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 2005.

Anne Washington is the Metadata Services Coordinator at the University of Houston Libraries, where she is responsible for managing metadata creation and maintenance for the University of Houston Digital Library and other repository services. Her research interests include technologies, such as linked data, that have the potential to more broadly expose and connect resources as well as inclusive, user-centered approaches to metadata. Anne received her MLIS from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Darnelle Melvin is the Special Collections and Archives Metadata Librarian and an Assistant Professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, where he is responsible for managing metadata activities, remediation projects, and metadata documentation. He is co-author of Linked Data for the Perplexed Librarian and researches metadata, linked data, and resource discovery in relation to digital libraries, repository migrations, and data integration.

(Not presenting but additional book co-author) Scott Carlson is a software and metadata professional with 12+ years of academic library and non-profit experience, Scott is currently a Digital Library Software Engineer focusing on Discovery access with Arizona State University.

CFP-Essays on Librarians/Archives/Libraries in Graphic Novels, Comic Strips and Sequential Art

Date: November 15, 2020
Subject Fields: Art, Art History & Visual Studies, Cultural History / Studies, Film and Film History, Library and Information Science, Popular Culture Studies

Call for Essays: Libraries, Archives, and Librarians in Graphic Novels, Comic Strips and Sequential Art edited by Carrye Syma, Donell Callender, and Robert G. Weiner.

The editors of a new collection of articles/essays are seeking essays about the portrayal of libraries, archives and librarians in graphic novels, comic strips, and sequential art/comics. The librarian and the library have a long and varied history in sequential art. Steven M. Bergson’s popular website LIBRARIANS IN COMICS (http://www.ibiblio.org/librariesfaq/comstrp/comstrp.htm; http://www.ibiblio.org/librariesfaq/combks/combks.htm) is a useful reference source and a place to start as is the essay Let’s Talk Comics: Librarians by Megan Halsband (https://blogs.loc.gov/headlinesandheroes/2019/07/lets-talk-comics-librarians/). There are also other websites which discuss librarians in comics and provide a place for scholars to start.

Going as far back as the Atlantean age the librarian is seen as a seeker of knowledge for its own sake. For example, in Kull # 6 (1972) the librarian is trying to convince King Kull that of importance of gaining more knowledge for the journey they about to undertake. Kull is unconvinced, however. In the graphic novel Avengers No Road Home (2019), Hercules utters “Save the Librarian” which indicates just how important librarians are as gatekeepers of knowledge even for Greek Gods. These are just a few examples scholars can find in sequential art that illustrate librarians as characters who take their roles as preservers of knowledge seriously. We will accept essays related to sequential art television shows and movies e.g., Batgirl in the third season of Batman (1966); Stan Lee being a librarian in The Amazing Spider-Man (2012) movie.

Some possible topics include:

  • Libraries and librarians in the comic strip Unshelved.
  • Oracle/Batgirl as an information engineer in the DC Universe.
  • Libraries and Librarians in the Marvel Universe Archives in the Star Wars Comics Archives/Librarians in the X-Men series
  • The Librarian in Neil Gaiman’s Sandman series
  • The librarian in the Buffy Comics
  • Libraries and Librarians in early and contemporary comic strips
  • Libraries and Librarians during the Golden Age (1940s/1950s) comics.
  • How is information seeking portrayed in graphic novels?
  • Librarians/Libraries in independent comics and graphic novels.
  • The use of graphic novels such as Matt Upson, C. Michael Hall, and Kevin Cannon’s Information Now.
  • Webcomics and Libraries and Librarians
  • In what other ways is the traditional role of librarian portrayed in other types of characters in comics? (oracle, seer, three witches, etc.)

These are just a few suggested topics. Any topic related to librarians/archives/librarians in comics and sequential art will be considered. We are seeking essays of 2,500-5,000 words (no longer) not including notes in APA style for this exciting new volume.

Please send a 300-500-word abstract by November 15th 2020 to Carrye Syma Carrye.Syma@ttu.edu Assistant Academic Dean and Associate Librarian Texas Tech University Libraries

Please note that this will be edited by three editors Rob Weiner, Carrye Syma, and Donell Callender even though Carrye Syma is the initial contact person.

New/Recent Publications

Books

Digital Preservation without Tears
Margot Note
(Lucidea Press, 2020)

Open Heritage Data: An introduction to research, publishing and programming with open data in the heritage sector
Henriette Roued-Cunliffe
(Facet Publishing, 2020)

Mapping Information Landscapes: New Methods for Exploring the Development and Teaching of Information Literacy
Andrew Whitworth
(Facet Publishing, 2020)

The Anarchivist
Geof Huth
(AC Books, 2020)

Digitizing Enlightenment: Digital Humanities and the Transformation of Eighteenth-Century Studies
Edited by Simon Burrows and Glenn Roe
(Oxford University Press, 2020)

Pen, print and communication in the eighteenth century
Archer-Parré, CarolineDick, Malcolm
(Liverpool University Press, 2020)

See the Museum & Archives catalog from Rowman & Littlefield.

Articles

Radical Holdings? Student Newspaper Collections in Australian University Libraries and Archives,” Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association, (May 2020)
Jessie Lymn & Tamara Jones

Other

Archives and Special Collections Linked Data: Navigating between Notes and Nodes
OCLC Research Archives and Special Collections Linked Data Review Group
(OCLC, 2020)

Podcasts

Archivist’s Alley:
S4.5: Miranda Barnewall: Advocacy, Career Examinations and Material Importance
S4.4: Claire Fox: Best Case Scenarios, Metadata Milieus & Graduating in a COVID-19 Landscape

The Keepers:
145 – Louis Jones, Field Archivist, Detroit

Library and Archives Canada:
Upcoming episodes

Library of Congress Digital Preservation:
William Kilbride, Digital Preservation Coalition

Lost in the Stacks:
ENCORE Episode 312: Data Driven Decisions
Episode 468: Bodies on the Line
Data as Wood

Transcripts:
Gender Reveal
Country Queers

Call for Chapters: Teaching Critical Reading Skills: Strategies for Academic Librarians Published by ACRL Press

Have you created library instructional or outreach activities focused on student reading? If you have case studies, lesson plans, stories, or programmatic approaches aimed at developing active, engaged, mindful, and critical readers, we want to hear from you.

Focus of the Book:

Librarians engage with student reading in a variety of ways: We work with students as they learn to become part of their disciplinary communities and practice reading scholarly articles, interpreting historical information from archival materials, and drawing conclusions based on information from unfamiliar source types like government documents, patents, figures, data, or works of criticism. This book will offer strategies for librarians working across a range of disciplinary areas so they can engage students who need to learn how to read in order to work, understand, and create new knowledge in their field.

We also work with students as they become critical, engaged citizens. We interact with students as they learn to make sense of information in web-based environments where authorship is often uncertain, take active steps to triangulate the information they find, and make decisions based on social media sources where bias and filter bubbles are inherent. We also work with student readers who come from a variety of backgrounds (e.g., non-native English speakers) and who are at different stages in their academic journey (e.g., transfer students or graduate students). This book will offer strategies that take into account librarians’ unique instructional opportunities to encourage students who read in order to understand, empathize, and create change.

Potential Chapter Topics May Include But Are Not Limited To:

  • Critical Reading – Defined and Examples in Practice
  • Primary Source Literacy (i.e., Special Collections and Archives) and Critical Reading
  • Reading for different student audiences – examples could include expert vs. novice approaches, reading instruction for first-year students, transfer students, or graduate students’ reading practices
  • Programmatic Approaches to Reading Programs
  • Community College Librarians and Critical Reading
  • Reading Scholarly Articles
  • Reading Beyond Scholarly Articles
  • Reading Emotionally Difficult Material
  • Reading in the Disciplines (i.e., sciences, social sciences, humanities)
  • Reading for Non-native English Speakers
  • Strategies for comprehending data or health resources
  • Reading strategies for different source types (e.g., opinion pieces, government documents, books…)

Submission Procedure:

Please submit an initial chapter proposal description of up to 500 words and a tentative chapter title. As part of your proposal description, please include a brief description of the practical content you will include in your chapter (e.g., lesson plan, instructional activity, assignment, outreach plan, or model for creating a campus program). Please also include the author(s)’ names, titles, and institutional affiliations, along with a link to current CV (or copy relevant info from your CV, which may be abbreviated to focus on information relevant to your experiences either with instruction and outreach or relevant publishing history).

Please submit proposals to: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSepZQVtqxnLvjRZLdGvhiVIFnIL5JWQFSq79xx0vLQqXdkJCg/viewform?usp=sf_link

Proposals are due by October 1, 2020.** Authors will be notified of their status (accept or decline) by November 15, 2020. A first draft of approximately 2000-5000 words (excluding endnotes and bibliography) will be due on February 15, 2021, and after receiving editorial feedback, a final draft will be due on July 31, 2021. Chapters must not be previously published or simultaneously submitted elsewhere.

**Special note – we very much understand that these are extremely strange and difficult times. If you have an idea but aren’t sure what your schedule looks like for fall/winter, please still contact us to express interest and share your idea. We’ll see what we can figure out together.**

Anticipated book publication date will be early 2022. Chapter authors will be able to make their chapters open access by posting final copies of their chapter in their institutional repositories.

For additional information, contact:

Hannah Gascho Rempel, Professor and Science Librarian, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR  – Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu

Rachel Hamelers, Teaching and Learning Librarian, Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA – rachelhamelers@muhlenberg.edu