CFP: Special Collections as Sites of Contestation

CFP: Special Collections as Sites of Contestation
Editor: Mary Kandiuk
Publisher: Library Juice Press

Special collections are actively acquired by libraries or received by donation. Increasingly, special collections are emerging as sites of contestation. Funding and political choices often underpin acquisition, access and promotion of these collections resulting in unequal representation, biased interpretations and suppressed narratives. This collection of essays will interrogate library practices relating to special collections. The essays will explore the reinterpretation and resituating of special collections held by libraries, examine the development and stewardship of special collections within a social justice framework, and describe the use of critical practice by libraries and librarians to shape and negotiate the acquisition, cataloguing, promotion and display of special collections.

Proposals are invited for chapters relating to special collections held by all types of libraries in all countries. Special collections are library and archival materials encompassing a wide range of formats and subject matters. They are usually distinguished by their historical, societal, cultural or monetary value, uniqueness or rarity, and are housed separately from a library’s main circulating collection with a commitment to preservation and access. Specific topics of interest include but are not limited to:

– Evolving understandings and interpretations of historical materials in special collections.
– Censorship, self-censorship, academic freedom, intellectual freedom and special collections.
– The use of critical practice to resist cultural hegemony in the development of special collections.
– The challenges of developing contemporary special collections relating to social justice.
– Examining special collections through the lens of the marginalized and disempowered.
– The representation of unpopular or radical views in special collections.
– Contested interpretations of special collections.
– Safe spaces and special collections.
– Controversial exhibits relating to special collections.
– Information literacy and special collections employing a social justice framework.
– Decolonizing and indigenizing special collections.
– Donors, funding, power and politics and their influence on the development of special collections.
– Development and stewardship of special collections relating but not limited to race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, politics, religion, war, conflict, genocide, sex, pornography, racism, discrimination, heritage, memory, and identity within a social justice framework.
– Any aspect of acquisition, curation, structure, cataloguing, digitization, presentation, arrangement, promotion, display and instruction relating to special collections using a social justice or critical practice framework.


Chapter proposals should contain 1) an abstract of 500-750 words describing the proposed contribution and 2) a brief biographical statement about the author(s). Proposals are due June 1, 2018. Please direct all submissions and inquiries to Mary Kandiuk (


June 1, 2018: Deadline for 500-750 abstract proposing a chapter.
July 1, 2018: Notification of acceptance of proposed chapter.
December 1, 2018: Deadline for submitting full chapter manuscript.

About the Editor

Mary Kandiuk is the Visual Arts, Design & Theatre Librarian and a Senior Librarian at York University in Toronto, Canada. She holds a Master of Arts in English and a Master of Library Science from the University of Toronto. She is the author of two bibliographies of secondary criticism relating to Canadian literature published by Scarecrow Press and co-author of Digital Image Collections and Services (ARL Spec Kit, 2013). She is co-editor of the collection In Solidarity: Academic Librarian Labour Activism and Union Participation in Canada published by Library Juice Press in 2014. Her most recent publications include articles on the topic of academic freedom. For more information see:

New/Recent Books

Information Systems: Process and Practice
Edited by Christine Urquhart, Faten Hamad, Dina Tbaishat, and Alison Yeoman

The Stuff of Bits: An Essay on the Materialities of Information 
by Paul Douris

Capturing Our Stories: An Oral History of Librarianship in Transition
A. Arro Smith

The Silence of the Archive
David Thomas, Simon Fowler, and Valerie Johnson

Creating Exhibits That Engage: A Manual for Museums and Historical Organizations
John Summers

Cultural Heritage Care and Management: Theory and Practice
edited by Cecilia Lizama Salvatore

Things Great and Small: Collections Management Policies, Second Edition
John E. Simmons

Commemoration: The American Association for State and Local History Guide
edited by Seth C. Bruggeman

An American Association for State and Local History Guide to Making Public History
edited by Bob Beatty

Fostering Empathy Through Museums
edited by Elif M. Gokcigdem

Practical Preservation and Conservation Strategies for Libraries
Brian J. Baird, illustrated by Jody Brown

Directory of Rare Book and Special Collections in the UK and Republic of Ireland, 3rd edition
edited by Karen Attar

Linked Data for Cultural Heritage
edited by Ed Jones and Michele Seikel

Open Licensing for Cultural Heritage
Gill Hamilton and Fred Saunderson

Valuing Your Collection: A practical guide for museums, libraries and archives
Freda Matassa

Call for Book Chapter Proposals: Becoming a Practitioner-Researcher: A Practical Guide for Information Professionals

Thank you to Caryn Radick for passing this on!

Dear colleagues,
We are soliciting chapter proposals for our forthcoming ACRL book, Becoming a Practitioner-Researcher: A Practical Guide for Information Professionals [working title]This book will gather practical advice from practitioners conducting research as part of their tenure or professional responsibilities at academic, public, and special libraries, and/or archives. We are seeking chapters from novice or seasoned practitioner-researchers who want to share their experiences in executing research and/or evaluation projects.

Focus of the Book:
This edited volume will address the challenges of undertaking research and offers support and advice for all stages of a project, from writing the proposal to collecting the data, to disseminating the findings whether it be an internal report or published journal article, and the myriad pitfalls that may occur in between.

Rather than focusing solely on methods, this book tackles issues such as balancing research project and work responsibilities, scaling your project to fit your budget and time constraints, collaborating with a partner or team, and other issues that impact projects. Our vision for this book is to curate an edited volume of insights that we wish we would have known when we embarked on our own research projects. Chapters will introduce and discuss a specific project in a specific institution, in order to frame the discussion of the aspects of the research process the chapter addresses. The narrative should be reflective and discuss what can be generalized about the experience that would be helpful for other practitioners in a “lessons learned” approach.

Part 1: The Research Process (starting your research, crafting a proposal, figuring out logistics)
Part 1 is about creating a holistic approach to undertaking research in a library or archive setting. We are seeking chapters that include sections addressing topics such as, but not limited to:

  • Developing an idea into a research proposal
  • Obtaining administrative buy-in and support
  • Budgeting (time, money, personnel)
  • Choosing a research design and data collection method
  • Navigating the IRB process
  • Deciding on the scale of a project and what is feasible
  • Analyzing your data
  • Sharing research (reports, formal outlets including journals)

We chose the term holistic because we feel the chapters should integrate several of the above bullet points when reflecting on research project experiences in the context of their library.

Part 2: Social Research Methods for Information Professionals (survey, content analysis observation studies, focus group, interviews, etc.) 
Part 2 is about the application of common research methods found in the library literature. Chapters should revolve around creating a research design and reflect on the realities of research practice, conveying to readers methods that worked well for particular contexts and projects. Each chapter in Part 2 will include sections on how the particular method was applied, the institutional context, and the bumps and bruises of going from research design to data collection. Please address these sections in your proposal if you are seeking inclusion in Part 2.
Potential topics include:

  • Surveys
  • Focus groups
  • Ethnographic methods (observation, visual, storytelling)
  • Interviews
  • Document/content/textual analysis

Part 3: Managing a Research Project (individual researchers and team-based collaboration)
Part 3 will bring into focus the experiences of individual researchers and teams. The purpose of this section is to provide readers a range of basic and complex project examples and how these projects have been managed by individual practitioners or collaborative teams.
Example topics for inclusion in a chapter:

  • Project management as a solo researcher
  • How teams determine responsibilities for a project
  • Cleaning and analysis of data as a team
  • Collaborating on cross-institutional projects
  • Publishing or writing as a team
  • Short reflective essays by individuals who have been both solo researchers and on a research team

Don’t see your topic here? Contact the editors at to discuss how your idea may fit within this book’s scope.

Proposal Guidelines:
To submit a proposal,  fill out the short Survey Monkey form and attach your proposal as a Word document (.doc or .docx). The form will require author names, job titles, and institutional affiliations. The Word document for the proposal itself should be written in Times New Roman, 12 pt., be double-spaced, and include:

  • A working title for your chapter
  • A 500-word description and chapter outline including topic keywords.
  • Authors must indicate which part of the book your chapter will address: Part 1: The Research Process, Part 2: Social Research Methods for Information Professionals, or Part 3: Managing a Research Project.
  • Authors will include one or two summary sentences that make explicit the chapter’s major themes, ideas, and learning outcomes.
  • Do not use any identifying information in your proposal (e.g., do not include author names or institution names in the Word doc).
  • Citations should follow the Endnotes-Bibliography format in the Chicago Manual of Style (17th edition).

Proposals are due by Friday, April 13, 2018 at 11:59PM PST and must be submitted via online form:

  • Contributors will be notified of their status (acceptance or rejection) within 6–8 weeks of the due date of proposals.
  • The first draft of chapters will be due in August 2018.
  • Estimated length of chapter: 2,500–4,000 words.
  • Projected publication date: Summer 2019.

Should you need to contact the editors, use the following email address: Bookmark the Google site:

Thank you,
Lee Ann Fullington (Health Sciences Librarian, Brooklyn College/CUNY)
Brandon K. West (Head of Research Instruction Services, SUNY Geneseo)
Frans Albarillo (Social Sciences Librarian, Brooklyn College/CUNY)

CFP: Shhhh…Murder!

Okay, this is not scholarly but too fun not to pass along. Though stated for librarians, I’m sure archivists can also submit.

Shhhh… Murder!

Scheduled for release in late spring of next year and timed for summer reading, this anthology will feature cozy to cozy-noir stories featuring libraries and librarians. Extra points will be shamelessly awarded to writers with personal ties to libraries.

The submission period for this anthology runs from November 1st to February 28th, upon the last stroke of midnight, Pacific Standard Time.

We are looking for stories from 2500 to 5000 words, but will consider stories outside that range, at our discretion. Contributors will share equally fifty percent of the royalties received. We expect between fifteen and twenty stories to be accepted and are aiming at a volume length of around eighty-five thousand words, and around two-hundred and thirty pages—all dependent, obviously, upon the length of the material chosen.

We will accept work previously published, provided it was not published after May of 2017, and that you hold the rights. Simultaneous submissions are fine, with the usual proviso that we should be notified should the work be accepted elsewhere, so that we may withdraw it from consideration.

Submissions and questions may be sent to

Here are some manuscript formatting tips.

Call for Chapter Proposals: Social Justice and Activism in Libraries, Moving Beyond Diversity to Action

Social Justice and Activism in Libraries, Moving Beyond Diversity to
Book Publisher: McFarland

Su Epstein, Ph.D., co-editor. Director, Saxton B. Little Free Library,
Columbia, Connecticut
Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Public Library Systems, Special, School Librarian,
Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor. Reference Librarian, Valencia College, Winter
Park, Florida

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school,
special librarians, LIS faculty, sharing how to take the concept of diversity
to the next level. The role librarians can play in social justice and social
change, activities supporting tolerance in libraries. Topics could be
inclusivity, tolerance, civic engagement, civic education, human rights,
social responsibility; in the areas of collection development, programming,
professional development, partnerships and outreach—just to name a few.

One author or two or three authors per chapter. Compensation: one
complimentary copy per 3,000-5,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many
co-authors or if one or two chapters: author discount on more copies.
Contributors are expected to sign a release form in order to be published.
Public, school and special librarians, LIS instructors are especially
encouraged to submit.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapters each described in a few sentences by
February 28, 2018, brief bio on each author; place TOL, LAST NAME on subject
line to:

Call for Chapter Proposals: Deaccessioning in Special Collections and Archives

Archivists and archival institutions are now deaccessioning more than ever before. As deaccessioning has become increasingly accepted as a useful collections management tool, some still perceive it as an ethical dilemma fraught with a high risk of controversy or angering donors and researchers alike. In archives deaccessioning, archivists grapple with ethical concerns, donor relations, appraisal questions, and disposition options. Deaccessioning in Special Collections and Archives, edited by Laura Uglean Jackson and published by Rowman & Littlefield, is the first book dedicated entirely to the topic of deaccessioning in special collections and archives. It will bring together case studies, perspectives, and in-depth discussions focused solely on topics and issues related to deaccessioning in all types of archival repositories.

Contributions from authors with experience in or knowledge of special collections and archives deaccessioning are welcome. I hope to include chapters on the following topics:

  • Case studies from various institution types (e.g. small repositories, lone arrangers, community archives)
  • Perspectives and opinion pieces about reappraisal and deaccessioning
  • Reappraisal and deaccessioning outside of the United States (particularly United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand)
  • Consequences of deaccessioning, including benefits and negative effects
  • Working with donors and donor relations
  • Sale of materials and use of proceeds
  • Deaccessioning compared to weeding
  • Ethical dilemmas of deaccessioning
  • Transparency/publicizing of deaccessioning, including collections and process
  • Reappraisal and deaccessioning of digital materials
  • Standards related to reappraisal and deaccessioning
  • Reappraisal challenges
  • Disposition of deaccessioned materials including transfer, return to donor, and destruction

If you have an idea for a chapter not listed, please contact me to discuss.

Proposals of no more than 500 words should be submitted to me by February 12, 2018. Please include a biographical statement. Decisions regarding the submissions will be made by early March. First drafts will be due in May with an expected completion date in November 2018. Proposals and questions can be sent to:

Laura Uglean Jackson
Archives and Special Collections Librarian
University of Northern Colorado

Call for Chapter Proposals: Creativity for Success and Personal Growth for Librarians

Creativity for Success and Personal Growth for Librarians
Book Publisher: McFarland

Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor, Library Partnerships with Writers and Poets
(McFarland, 2017); public, academic librarian, indexer.

Carol Smallwood, co-editor, Gender Studies in the Library (McFarland, 2017);
public library administrator, special, school librarian.

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school,
special librarians, LIS faculty, library administrators, and board members.
Successful proposals will address creative, practical, how-to chapters and
case studies depicting a variety of aspects and angles of the library
profession as a creative endeavor, within the library walls and beyond such as
being an artist, writer, photographer, editor. Ideas needed that can serve as
a foundation, incorporate into an MLIS course; a Human Resources’ or an
organizational plan, as well kick-start personal career goals planning. The
focus is on library staff professional and personal growth and development,
NOT creative programming and services for patrons. Request a helpful tentative
Table of Contents.

No previously published, simultaneously submitted material. One, two, or three
authors per chapter; each chapter by the same author(s). Compensation: one
complimentary copy per 3,000-5,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many
co-authors or if one or two chapters; author discount. Contributors are
expected to sign a release form in order to be published.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapter(s) with a concise clear summary by
February 28, 2018, with brief bio on each author; place CRE, Your Name, on
subject line to