Call for Submissions: Sustainability in Libraries

This call does not specifically mention archives, but directly relates to initiatives that archivists are engaged in.

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Sustainability in Libraries, edited by Rebekkah Smith Aldrich, Monika Antonelli, Adrian Ho, and René Tanner will be published by ALA Editions. The book will offer insights into the important developments on how librarians provide leadership and how libraries serve as models for sustainable practices. The editors are seeking articles from a variety of perspectives on topics related to sustainability-including crisis preparation, response, and recovery-within the library profession.

Objective of the Book:

In 2019, the American Library Association adopted Sustainability as a new core value. This book will provide direction to library personnel and libraries as institutions to position themselves as connectors, conveners, and catalysts for the changes needed. “Sustainability” is not an end point but a mindset, a lens through which operational and outreach decisions can be made. With the climate crisis upon us and its devastating impact on wildlife, oceans, air quality, soil, and the very fabric of life on Earth, we are compelled to find answers and provide direction for our library communities whether they be rural, suburban, metropolitan, schools, or institutions of higher learning. The examples and ideas shared in this edited volume will have far reaching potential and bolster the United Nations’ work on the Sustainable Development Goals, which seek to create a more sustainable future for all.

Suggested Topics:

The book chapters will be divided into three main themes for sustainable action.

Theme #1: Libraries as Inspiration & Catalysts – Content that would fall under this theme include topics and examples related to how libraries may provide leadership and serve as a model for sustainable practices through facility stewardship, innovative service design, and outreach and partnership practices.

Theme #2: Libraries as Conveners & Connectors – Content that would fall under this theme include topics and examples related to how libraries work collaboratively through visionary partnerships to facilitate collective impact work to address existing challenges and opportunities with a focus on community well-being and self-reliance.

Theme #3: Libraries as Contributors to Community Resilience – Content that would fall under this theme includes topics and examples of how libraries contribute to future community resilience. For example, active participation in library-centric or community-based resilience/disaster preparedness, response, and recovery efforts and work that contributes to creating a culture of respect, understanding, and empathy in the library’s service area.

Target Audience:

The intended audience for this book is people working in public, school, academic, special, rural, and urban libraries. In addition, this book will include instructional materials to be used in Library and Information Science programs to educate future library practitioners about Sustainability, the newest Core Value of Librarianship.

Special Considerations:

High quality, large file, professional, black and white images are encouraged to enhance the text. Unless they are public domain or openly licensed for commercial use, a permission release will be required for each image submitted. A model release form will be necessary for any images with recognizable people in them. The person must be a legal adult or have a parent’s permission to use the image.

Submission Guidelines:

The editors welcome submissions from authors who are interested or have experience creating sustainable libraries or working on topics of sustainability in connection with libraries. The editors are open to a variety of submissions including research articles, how-to articles, essays, and interviews. Manuscript submissions should comply with APA Style.

The editors are looking for submissions about sustainability in libraries that emphasize scalable approaches that can be applied to a variety of libraries at different levels. Brief proposals about programs and partnerships that provide inspiration and actionable takeaways are encouraged. Submit a summary of your proposed article (300 words or less) to Sustainability in Libraries.

The development of manuscripts will be done in phases. After comments are returned to authors regarding accepted chapter summary proposals, a chapter outline (500 words or less) will be requested.

Once authors receive acceptance for their chapters they will submit their final manuscripts in .doc or .docx format.  Suggested length is 2,000 to 3,500 words.  Manuscripts should comply with APA style guidelines.

Timeline:

  • Chapter Summary Proposal deadline:  June 15, 2020
  • Notification by editors of proposal acceptance: July 15, 2020
  • Chapter Outlines deadline:  August 17, 2020
  • First Manuscript Drafts deadline: October 1, 2020
  • Additional key dates will be sent to successful proposal writers.

Submit chapter summary proposals to: forms.gle/axqBoa1c9LAa6GQF6

For additional information, please contact:

Adrian Ho, Director of Digital Scholarship, University of Kentucky, hoadriank[at]gmail[dot]com, or

Rene Tanner, Liaison Librarian, Humanities Division, Arizona State University, rene.tanner[at]asu[dot]edu.

Call for Essays: Women and the Art and Science of Collecting: Eighteenth-Century Collecting Beyond Europe

Women and the Art and Science of Collecting: Eighteenth-Century Collecting Beyond Europe
Edited by Dr. Arlene Leis and Dr. Kacie Wills
Abstracts due by 1 July 2020, with case studies due by 31 October 2020 and longer essays due 1 December 2020

We are inviting chapter abstracts for a collection of essays designed for academics, specialists, and enthusiasts interested in the interrelations between art and science in women’s collections and collecting practices beyond Europe in the long 18th century. This volume will follow our forthcoming compendium on the topic entitled, Women and the Art and Science of Collecting in Eighteenth-Century Europe, published by Routledge. This book recovers women’s histories through numerous interdisciplinary discourses pertaining to the subject of collecting, and it examines their interests, methodologies, and practices in relation to cultures of art and science.

In the second volume, we continue this discussion and consider women’s relationships to collecting of European and non-European objects, gathered, exchanged, and displayed within colonies and with indigenous cultures beyond Europe. Responding to ideas about indigenous collecting raised by Nicholas Thomas, Jennifer Newell, Greg Dening, Anne D’Alleva, Adriana Craciun, Mary Terrall, and others, we also aim to consider intercultural exchanges and collections of objects relatively unknown to Europeans. European collecting often traces its roots to biblical mythologies, such as the stories of Adam (naming and owning) and Noah (rescuing and preserving). What are the histories of collecting beyond Europe? And in what ways did women actively participate in or challenge those stories?

We hope to explore a diverse range of theoretical contexts, such as art historical, material culture, feminist, social, performance, gender, colonial, archival, and literary. We welcome essays that take a material culture approach and are particularly keen on research that makes use of new archival resources. We encourage interdisciplinary perspectives and are especially interested in essays that reveal the way in which women’s collections outside of Europe participated in cultures of art and science.

The compendium will consist of around ten essays of 6,000–6,500 words (with footnotes), each with up to four illustrations. In addition to these more traditional essays, we are looking for shorter (circa 1,000 words) case studies on material objects of interest from the period. The subject of women’s collections and art and science is also central to these smaller contributions, and each will include one illustration.

We aim to address the following topics and questions:
• The practice of collecting as cultural construct
• Decolonizing collecting
• What motivated women to collect in places outside of Europe? What were they collecting? How were women’s collections beyond Europe similar or different to their European counterparts?
• Women’s travel, immigration, exploration and the mobility of objects
• Collaborations
• Classification, taxonomies and methodologies of collecting outside of Europe
• Religious collections
• Display
• Collecting for power and status
• Preservation, creation and learning
• The aesthetics of collecting beyond Europe
• Women’s exchanges/interactions with indigenous populations
• Collections formed as a means of making sense of the world

All inquiries should be addressed to Arlene Leis, aleis914@gmail.com or Kacie Wills, kacie.wills@gmail.com
. Essay abstracts of 500 words and 300 word abstracts for smaller case studies are due July 1, 2020 and should be sent along with a short bio to: kacie.wills@gmail.com and aleis914@gmail.com. Finished case studies will be due October 31, 2020, and long essays will be due December 1, 2020.

Call for Contributions: The Handbook for Archival Practice

The first call for contributions to The Handbook for Archival Practice was a success. A number of articles are now under review as a result of an “open” call. A second call is now available which seeks authors for specific terms.

Check out the “call for proposals” at https://thapproject.org/call-for-proposals/ and then “complete the survey” (link on the page) by May 15 to become part of this collaborative publication.

Questions can be directed to Pat Franks (patricia.franks@sjsu.edu)

Stacie Williams Appointed SAA Publications Editor

Stacie M. Williams, director of the Center for Digital Scholarship at the University of Chicago, was appointed Publications Editor of the Society of American Archivists (SAA) and will begin her three-year term on April 1, 2020. The appointment was made by the SAA Council following a five-month search.

Williams will helm a program that has published 90 books along with dozens of case studies and other electronic content since 2000. The Publications Editor is responsible for setting a vision and providing philosophical direction for the program, directing the work of the twelve-member Publications Board, acquiring and reviewing manuscripts, and maintaining a transparent review process.

Williams has published and lectured widely in the archives, library, and journalism professions. Her work has appeared in SAA’s journal American ArchivistJournal of Critical Library and Information StudiesLitHubNew York Magazine, and The Rumpus. She is the author of Bizarro Worlds (Fiction Advocate, 2018), a bibliomemoir interrogating gentrification and race in Jonathan Lethem’s novel The Fortress of Solitude. Within SAA, Williams has served as newsletter editor for the Archivists and Archives of Color Section, co-chair of the Women Archivists Section, and chair of the 2017–2018 Nominating Committee. She attended the 2015 Archives Leadership Institute and subsequently served on the institute’s faculty in 2017 and 2018.

In addition, Williams has served or currently serves on the advisory boards for the Digital Library Federation, which provides guidance on the design and application of digital library technologies; Rhizome’s National Forum on Ethics and Archiving the Web; the community activist-driven oral history project A People’s Archive of Police Violence in Cleveland; and Documenting the Now, which develops tools and practices for the ethical collection and preservation of social media content.

“Publishing is foundational to how we perform our work,” said Williams, who holds a bachelor of arts degree in journalism from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and a master of science degree in library science with an archives management concentration from Simmons College. “Having access to the perspectives and processes of our peers—historical, contemporary, and futurist—is how we share our work with each other and also how we challenge it.”

Williams will succeed Christopher J. Prom, Associate Dean for Digital Strategies at the University of Illinois, Urbana–Champaign, who is completing his second three-year term as SAA Publications Editor.

ACRL’s Publications in Librarianship Monograph Series Announces First Open Peer Review

This has nothing to do with archives, but I find this a very interesting project – to have an open peer-review. Anyone can participate as long as they agree to the terms.


ACRL’s Publications in Librarianship (PIL) series—a peer-reviewed collection of books that examine emerging theories and research—is launching its first open peer review, for Stories of Open: Opening Peer Review through Narrative Inquiry by Emily Ford.

“Open access, open data, open science, and other ‘open’ initiatives bring democratization and transparency to scholarly publishing and access to information,” said PIL Editor Daniel C. Mack. “Rather than limiting the assessment and evaluation of research to a single editor or editorial board, open peer review empowers the entire community of scholars to participate in the review process. Stories of Open presents readers with a thought-provoking introduction to open peer review; we couldn’t imagine a better manuscript for our pilot open review.”

The manuscript is open for comment through Monday, March 23, 2020. It is available for review in two places, and we welcome and encourage your participation: First, via Google documents here, where participants will need to use their Google account and request access at the top left before commenting. Doing so means agreeing to the reviewer’s code of conduct. A PDF version of the manuscript is available for review on the ACRL site. Comments should be sent to Daniel C. Mack at dmack@umd.edu.

Stories of Open is expected to publish in early 2021. Previous PIL books can be found in the ALA Store; information on publishing in the series is here. Questions on the review, process, or publishing with ACRL can be sent to ACRL Content Strategist Erin Nevius at enevius@ala.org.

Call for Chapters: Learning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries

Call for Book Chapter Proposals

Working titleLearning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries

Proposal submission deadline: January 27th, 2020

Editors: Arianne Hartsell-Gundy (Duke University), Kim Duckett (Duke University), Sarah Morris (University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill)

Publisher: Association of College & Research Libraries

Chapter proposals are invited for Learning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries, a book examining how academic librarians can best support interns, graduate assistants, and practicum and field experience students (both LIS and other fields). We welcome proposals focused on philosophical perspectives, practical strategies, reflective essays, and/or case studies. In addition to contributions from staff working in academic libraries, we welcome contributions from LIS faculty and current and recent graduate students.

Proposals are sought for chapters related to the following themes. Proposals should be between 250-300 words, and final chapters will be between 3000-4000 words.

Preparing Graduate Students for Professional Roles

This section will explore how internships, assistantships, practicums, and field experiences can support the learning of graduate students in order to help readers consider how these programs benefit graduate students and how they might want to structure such learning experience in their institutions. We hope to see explorations of skill-based training and discussions of how to most effectively mentor graduate students through hands-on work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • The role of internships, field experiences, and practicums in LIS or other forms of graduate education
  • Developing professional workplace skills (e.g: time management, project management, workplace communication, reflective practice, self-awareness)
  • Preparing graduate students for the job search – job hunting, applying for professional positions, resume development, interview preparation

Logistics & Structures for Designing Graduate Student Work Experiences

This section will look at how to administer these types of positions and programs in order for readers to gain a bigger picture of what it takes to oversee this work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Strategies for structuring learning experiences for students (either programs or individualized experiences)
  • Interviewing, selecting and/or hiring
  • Developing a diverse and inclusive workforce and environment
  • Onboarding and approaches to training
  • Program assessment

Ethical Considerations

This section will examine the complex ethical issues surrounding these types of graduate experiences in order to help the reader consider how they will address these questions in their work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Issues surrounding paid versus unpaid labor
  • Ensuring students receive credit for their work (e.g. course credit, acknowledgement)
  • Issues related to balancing the organization’s needs and students’ learning and professional development needs

Managers’ Perspectives

This section will address the experience of the managers of these work experiences in order to give both new and seasoned managers insight into what these experiences will mean for them.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Tips for mentoring and coaching
  • The first-time manager perspective
  • Emotional labor, boundaries, and self-care
  • How to make it meaningful for you, your work, and your own professional goals

Students’ Perspectives

This section highlights LIS students’ perspectives on positive and negative aspects of their work experiences, and practical advice for making the most out of their internships, assistantships, etc.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Finding and designing meaningful graduate student work experience(s)
  • Strategies for self-advocacy
  • Perspectives on career-preparedness
  • Navigating workplace dynamics as a temporary employee
  • Balancing work responsibilities with coursework and life experiences

Submission Procedure

Proposals should be submitted as a single email attachment to learninginactionlibraries@gmail.com

Proposals should include:

  • Author name(s), institutional affiliation(s), job title(s)
  • Brief description of your experience as a graduate student or working with graduate students in academic libraries
  • Brief statement of your interests in professional writing
  • Clear description of the topic you are proposing for a potential chapter (about 250-300 words)

Important dates:

Proposals due: January 27th, 2020
Authors notified and sent chapter guidelines: March 15th, 2020
Full chapters due: June 29th, 2020
Final revised chapters due: November 16th, 2020

For additional information contact:

Arianne Hartsell-Gundy, Duke University Libraries: arianne.hartsell.gundy@duke.edu

CFP: Call for Chapter Proposals on Data Literacy

Dear colleagues,

Do you ever help students or faculty with data? Does that work involve helping them to understand:

  • How to find and interpret data?
  • How to be a critical consumer of data?
  • How to be an ethical producer of data?
  • What it means to decolonize data?
  • Why it’s important to document and share research data?
  • Any other form of data literacy?

Then you are invited and encouraged to submit chapter proposals for an upcoming book to be published by ALA Editions, tentatively titled Teaching Critical Thinking with Numbers: Data Literacy and the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Each chapter should be between 4,000 and 6,000 words, and should include a discussion of the ways in which you and/or your colleagues and institution are incorporating data literacy into your work. Possible topics for these case studies could include, but are not limited to, methods for incorporating data literacy into information literacy instruction, experiences promoting data literacy in digital scholarship projects, or strategies for getting community buy-in for data literacy across your institution. If you have any questions about a topic you are considering, you are encouraged to reach out to Julia Bauder (bauderj@grinnell.edu) to discuss it before submitting a full proposal.

To submit a proposal, please e-mail the following to bauderj@grinnell.edu by February 3, 2020:

  • An approximately 400-word summary of the proposed chapter.
  • For each author:
    • Name, institution, and current title.
    • A list of previous publications.
    • If no previous publications, please include or link to a writing sample.

Timeline:

February 3, 2020: Chapter proposals due.
February 21, 2020: Authors notified of acceptance of chapter proposals.
July 1, 2020: Chapter drafts due.
August 14, 2020: Chapter drafts returned to authors for revisions.
October 17, 2020: Chapter revisions due.

Thank you for considering submitting a proposal. Please, if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to me.

Julia Bauder, editor, Teaching Critical Thinking with Numbers: Data Literacy and the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education