CFP: Women and Museums A Focus Issue for the Journal Collections

CALL FOR PAPERS
Women and Museums
A Focus Issue for the journal Collections

Guest Edited by Dr. Holly Farrell, Postdoctoral researcher, Leiden University, Netherlands

Deadline: March 1, 2023

While not always as well-known as their male counterparts, women have been involved in
the development of museums since their conception. Whether as donors, collectors, or
employees, women have had important roles in the building up and display of collections in
museums throughout the world. As work is done to highlight the histories of museum
institutions and collecting practices, it is important to acknowledge the distinct position of
women in this area. The contribution of women to museums and collections is invariably
linked to issues of gender, along with class and race, making for a rich and nuanced area of
research. Developing from the Women and Museums Conference, Leiden University 2022,
this special issue will explore the varied ways in which women participated in such
institutions. The relationship between women, museums and collections historically is an
important site for understanding connections between people, institutions and objects.
We invite contributions from scholars and practitioners writing on topics related to the
following:
• Women’s collections
• Women as donators
• Women and museum work
• Private collections
• Imperialism and women collecting
• Folk museums and women
• Women’s photography collections
• Women travellers and collectors
• Women working in the shadow of men
We are particularly interested in articles which relate to gender, race, class intersections in
the lives of the women examined.
For this issue, we are seeking articles, essays, and case studies of 2,000-3,000 words (8-12
pages double spaced, plus notes and references). Authors should express their interest by
submitting a 300-word abstract and any relevant information (such as short bio or pertinent
URLs) to the guest editor, h.o.farrell@hum.leidenuniv.nl, and the journal editor,
jdgsh@rit.edu, by March 1, 2023. Notification of acceptance will be made by May 1, 2023,
with the deadline for submission of final papers of September 1, 2023 through the SAGE
online submission portal. Publication is anticipated for volume 19 or 20 an issue date of
2023/2024. For additional information or to receive samples of the journal, please contact
the journal editor, Juilee Decker, jdgsh@rit.edu.

Issued September 8, 2022

Framing References:
• Women and Museums Conference, Leiden University 2022.
• Two issues of the journal published in 2018,
https://journals.sagepub.com/toc/cjx/14/3 and
https://journals.sagepub.com/toc/cjx/14/4, guest edited by Janet Ashton, Margot
Note, and Consuelo Sendino.
• Bracken, Susan. Andrea M. Gáldy, Adriana. Turpin, and University of London. Institute
of Historical Research. Women Patrons and Collectors. Newcastle upon Tyne:
Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2012.

• D’Ancona Modena, Louisa Levi. “The ‘beautiful enigma,’a case study of German-
Jewish women in collector networks in Rome (1880-1914).” Journal of the History of

Collections (2022).
• Hill, Kate, Women and museums, 1850–1914: modernity and the gendering of
knowledge. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016.
• Leis, A C. Sarah Sophia Banks: femininity, sociability and the practice of collecting in
late Georgian England. York: University of York, 2013.
• Leis, Arlene, and Kacie Wells. Women and the Art and Science of Collecting in
Eighteenth-Century Europe. New York: Routledge, 2021.
• Levin, Amy K. (ed), Gender, sexuality and museums, A Routledge reader. London:
Routledge, 2010.
• Proctor-Tiffany, Mary. “Doris Duke and Mary Crane, Collecting Islamic art for Shangri
La, a Hawaiian hideaway home.” Journal of the History of Collections (2022).

CFP: Collections and COVID-19

Articles are sought for a focus issue of the journal Collections which will consider collections and COVID-19. How have museums, archives, and libraries been impacted by COVID-19? What impact has COVID-19 had on collections, particularly?

In particular this call seeks contributions which address any of the following: institutional efforts at rapid response collecting; the intrinsic value of building collections during this historic time; the role and messaging of collections during the pandemic; the shift to online collection display as a way of providing opportunities for online engagement while institutions are not permitting visitors; the role of “essential staff” and their duties as related to collections; the financial impact of COVID-19 on collections; and other topics within the scope of “Collections and COVID-19”

For this issue, we are seeking articles, essays, and case studies of 2,000-3,000 words (8-12 pages double-spaced, plus notes and references). Authors should express their interest by submitting a 150-word abstract, anticipated article length, number of images, and any relevant information (such as context, short bio, pertinent URLs) to the guest editor carrie.meyer@unmc.edu and the journal editor jdgsh@rit.edu by Tuesday, June 30, 2020.

Notification of acceptance will be made by July 15, 2020, with the deadline for submission of final papers set for August 30, 2020 through the SAGE online submission portal. Publication is anticipated for volume 17 with an issue date of 2021.

For additional information or to receive samples of the journal, please contact the journal editor, Juilee Decker, jdgsh@rit.edu.

 

CFP: Women & Collections, A Focus Issue of the journal Collections: A Journal for Museum and Archives Professionals

Published by Rowman & LittlefieldGuest Editors: Consuelo Sendino, Natural History Museum, London, Janet Ashton, British Library, and Margot Note, Independent Consultant

Women have not been only inspiration for the cultural world, but been also active as collectors or researchers in collections. They have left their mark in science, natural history and art. Important contributions to cite chronologically are those of Catherine the Great of Russia (1762-1796, art collector), Frances Mary Richardson Currer (1785-1861, book collector), Mary Anning (1799 – 1847, fossil collector) and Gertrude Bell (1868-1926, archaeologist who helped with the establishment of the National Museum of Iraq with one of the best collections of Mesopotamian antiquities).

Although the role of women has been important in collections, it has not been so popular as with males. This issue will display different roles in which women have been active in collections such as active collectors, known by their input in collections or for inspiration.

Articles might be focused on any role played by women regarding collections:

  • Women as collectors
  • Women as collection researchers
  • Women as inspirational point of view
  • Women as collection subject

For this issue, we are seeking articles and case studies of 15-25 pages, reviews, technical columns, and observations. See https://rowman.com/Page/Journals for more information about the journal. For more information, contact the journal editor, Juilee Decker, jdgsh@rit.edu.

Published by Rowman & Littlefield, Collections is a multi-disciplinary journal addressing all aspects of handling, preserving, researching, interpreting, and organizing collections. Established in 2004, the journal is an international, peer-reviewed publication that seeks timely exploration of the issues, practices, and policies related to collections. Scholars, archivists, curators, librarians, collections managers, preparators, registrars, educators, emerging professionals, and others are encouraged to submit their work for this focus issue.

Authors should express their interest by submitting a 150-word abstract to the journal editor by February 15, 2018. The deadline for submission of final papers is April 1, 2018. Publication is anticipated for volume 14 or 15 with an issue date of 2018 or 2019.

New Issue: Collections

Collections Vol 13 N2

Note from Editor
Juilee Decker

Introduction from Guest Editors
Greg Lambousy and Mark Cave

Using Oral Histories at The National WWII Museum
Keith Huxen

20th Century Bronx Childhood: Recalling the Faces and Voices
Janet Butler Munch

Digital Storytelling for Heritage across Media
Natalie Underberg-Goode

The Louisiana State Museum Music Collection Oral Histories: Digitization, Preservation, and Use
David Kunian

(Co)Constructing Public Memories: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Creating Born-Digital Oral History Archives
Ren Harman, Tarryn Abrahams, Andrew Kulak, David Cline, Adrienne Serra, Ellen Boggs, Shannon Larkin, Jessie Rogers, Ashley Stant, Quinn Warnick, Katrina Powell

Past Forward: Oral History Interviews with Holocaust Survivors and Storytelling
Uta Larkey

The Brooklyn Listening Project: Using Oral History as a Pedagogical Tool
Colleen Bradley-Sanders

Listening to Scientists’ Stories: Using the British Library’s “An Oral History of British Science” Archive
Ruth Wainman

Telling the Stories of Forgotten Communities: Oral History, Public Memory, and Black Communities in the American South
Marco Robinson, Farrah Gafford Cambrice, Phyllis Earles

This Sense of Place/This Living Archive: Co-Creative Digitization and First Nations People’s Remembering
Benjamin Ridgeway and Olivia Guntarik