Themed Issue, The Journal of Interactive Technology & Pedagogy: Teaching & Research with Archives

The Journal of Interactive Technology & Pedagogy: Teaching & Research with Archives, Issue Fourteen

Introduction
Danica Savonick, Jojo Karlin, and Stephen Klein

Possibly Impossible; Or, Teaching Undergraduates to Confront Digital and Archival Research Methodologies, Social Media Networking, and Potential Failure 
Rebekah Fitzsimmons and Suzan Alteri

From Page to Screen and Back Again: Archives-Centered Pedagogy in the 21st Century Writing Classroom
Elizabeth Davis, Nancee Reeves, and Teresa Saxton

Crowdsourcing Traumatic History: Understanding the Historial Archive
Kristi Girdharry

Digital Paxton: Collaborative Construction with Eighteenth-Century Manuscript Collections
Will Fenton, Kate Johnson, and Kelly Schmidt

The Space Between Researcher, Object, Institution: Building Collaborative Knowledge with Primary Sources
Mary Catherine Kinniburgh

Narrating Memory through Rhetorical Reflections: CUNY Students and Their Archives
Wendy Hayden, María Hernández-Ojeda, and Iris Finkel

Engaging Women’s History through Collaborative Archival Wikipedia Projects  

Ariella Rotramel, Rebecca Parmer, and Rose Oliveira

Collaboration Adventures with Primary Sources: Exploring Creative and Digital Outputs
Jennifer Needham and Jeanann Croft Haas

Realizing the Past: Charting a Course for Sustainable Instruction and Engagement with Archival Materials Using Augmented and Virtual Reality Technologies
Amanda G. Pellerin, Ximin Mi, and Alison Valk

Branching Out: Using Historical Records to Connect with the Environment
Wendy Wasman, Thomas Beatman, Shanon Donnelly, Kathryn Flinn, Jeremy Spencer, and Ryan Trimbath

Views from the Field

Teaching Colonial Translations Through Archives: From Ink and Quill to XML (Or Not)
Allison Margaret Bigelow

Diving into the Wreck: (Re)Creating the Archive in the First Year Writing Classroom 
Maxine Krenzel and Daisy Atterbury

Born-Digital Archives in the Undergraduate Classroom
Mackenzie Brooks

How a Digital Collaboration at Oberlin College Between Archivists, Faculty, Students and Librarians Found Its Muse in Mary Church Terrell, Nineteenth-Century Feminist and Civil Rights Icon
Ken Grossi, Alexia Hudson-Ward, Carol Lasser, Sarah Minion, and Natalia Shevin

Issue Fourteen Masthead

Issue Editors
Danica Savonick
Jojo Karlin
Stephen Klein

Managing Editor
Patrick DeDauw

Copyeditors
Anne Donlon
Patrick DeDauw
Jojo Karlin
Benjamin Miller
Nicole Zeftel

Style and Structure Editor
Dominique Zino

Staging Editors
Teresa Ober
Lisa Brundage
Anne Donlon
Krystyna Michael
Benjamin Miller
Danica Savonick
sava saheli singh
Inés Vañó García
Luke Waltzer

Society of Florida Archivists Journal Vol. 1 Issue 1 Now Available

The SFAJ Editorial Board is delighted to announce that Volume 1 Issue 1 of the Society of Florida Archivists Journal is now published online! You can find it under the Current Issue menu on the SFAJ website. Below is a list of the wonderful authors that contributed articles to this issue as well as the folks who provided some insightful book reviews. Congratulations to all for a job well done!

Articles:

Matthew Miguez
Robert Rubero
Sandra Varry
Rory Grennan
Krystal Thomas

Reviews:

Elliot Williams
David Benjamin

The editorial team learned a lot by putting this first issue together and now we’re ready to start creating the next one! A recent Call for Future Papers went out in the Fall 2018 Florida Archivist Newsletter so please consider submitting for a future issue.

If you have an essay, case study, reflective or opinion piece, tool or book review, or any other work-in-progress paper please reach out to the Journal at floridaarchivists.journal@gmail.com. We’d love to know what you’re working on as we consider content for our 2019 issue.

Archives & Manuscripts Promotes Open Access

How to share your Archives and Manuscripts articles

The Archives and Manuscripts team are requesting that all contributors please consider posting the accepted manuscript* version of articles and reviews published from 2012 onwards on their preferred platform.

The accepted manuscript of anything published in Archives and Manuscripts from 2012 onwards can be shared on any platform. Including but not limited to: your personal website, your LinkedIn profile, your institution’s repository.

We only require that you add the following text to your manuscript:  “This is an [Accepted Manuscript / Original Manuscript] of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Archives and Manuscripts on [date of publication], available at http://wwww.tandfonline. com/[Article DOI].”

Adding this text will assist anyone who found your article or review to cite you correctly.

Refer to this infographic for further information about ways in which you can share your Archives and Manuscripts article.

If you have any questions or queries about this information, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with the A&M Journal Team.

*The accepted manuscript version of your article is “your paper after peer review, when it has been revised and accepted for publication by the journal editor”. Please note that it is not the final version of your article which has been copyedited and typeset.  Instructions to sharing your work

Information & Culture: New Book Reviews

Making IT Work: A History of the Computer Services Industry by Jeffrey R. Yost
Reviewed by Sarah A. Bell

The computer services industry has worldwide annual revenues of nearly a trillion dollars and employs millions of workers, but is often overshadowed by the hardware and software products industries. In this book, Jeffrey Yost shows how computer services, from consulting and programming to data analytics and cloud computing, have played a crucial role in shaping information technology—in making IT work… (MIT Press)

Weaving the Dark Web: Legitimacy on Freenet, Tor, and I2P, by Robert Gehl
Reviewed by Elinor Carmi

The term “Dark Web” conjures up drug markets, unregulated gun sales, stolen credit cards. But, as Robert Gehl points out in Weaving the Dark Web, for each of these illegitimate uses, there are other, legitimate ones: the New York Times‘s anonymous whistleblowing system, for example, and the use of encryption by political dissidents. Defining the Dark Web straightforwardly as websites that can be accessed only with special routing software, and noting the frequent use of “legitimate” and its variations by users, journalists, and law enforcement to describe Dark Web practices (judging them “legit” or “sh!t”), Gehl uses the concept of legitimacy as a window into the Dark Web. He does so by examining the history of three Dark Web systems: Freenet, Tor, and I2P… (MIT Press)

My Life as a Spy: Investigations in a Secret Police File by Katherine Verdery
Reviewed by Kalpana Shankar

As Katherine Verdery observes, “There’s nothing like reading your secret police file to make you wonder who you really are.” In 1973 Verdery began her doctoral fieldwork in the Transylvanian region of Romania, ruled at the time by communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. She returned several times over the next twenty-five years, during which time the secret police—the Securitate—compiled a massive surveillance file on her. Reading through its 2,781 pages, she learned that she was “actually” a spy, a CIA agent, a Hungarian agitator, and a friend of dissidents: in short, an enemy of Romania. (Duke University Press)

New Issue: International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives Journal

Issue 49 of the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives (IASA) Journal

2019 Conference Reminder

IASA Journal Editorial Board

Editorial

President’s Letter

Tribute: Claes Cnattingius

Announcement: First edition of IASA-TC 06 online

Profiles
Musings on the Importance of Harnessing the Power of the Internet to Improve Access to Soundtracks
Sami Meddeb, Tunisia
Louis Fortin, Les Productions Mission Vision, Canada

On the Bright Side of Data Migrations
Reto Kromer, AV Preservation by reto.ch, Switzerland

Articles
Joining Forces in Audiovisual Digitisation, Digital Preservation and Access: The Indian and the Flemish Approach
Irfan Zuberi (NCAA) and Brecht Declercq (VIAA)

Sound Practice: Exploring DACS Compliance in Archival Description of Music Recordings
Elizabeth Surles, Archivist, Institute of Jazz Studies, Rutgers University, USA

Moving Image User-Generated Description: A Matter of Time
Edward A. Benoit, School of Library & Information Studies, Louisiana State University, USA

Special Issue on Archives: disClosure

disClosure: A Journal of Social History, Volume 27
(open access)

Editors’ Preface and Acknowledgements
Sophonie Bazile, Christine Woodward, and Zachary Griffith

A Word about the Cover Art
Sophonie Bazile, Christine Woodward, and Zachary Griffith

Place, Memory, and Archive: An Interview with Karen Till
Emily Kaufman and Christine Woodward

Traditional Knowledge and Indigenous Archives: An Interview with Kim Christen
Leslie Davis, Zachary Griffith, and Jacob Neely

Categories as Archives: From Silence to Social Justice: An Interview with Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra
Sophonie Bazile, Juan Fernandez-Cantero, and Jess Linz

Images, Silences, and the Archival Record: An Interview with Michelle Caswell
Harrison Cole and Zachary Griffith

Three Poems
Wendy Burk, Julie Swarstad Johnson, and Sarah Kortemeier

To Un-Become: Between Historic Reminder and Hallucination, Geographical Document and Childhood Memory, Collective Tragedy and Personal Healing
Saša Rajšić

Holodomor
Taylor Diken

Gonna die (poem)
Wes Grooms

Library
Jessy Randall and Briget Heidmous

The Meadow and the Archive
Kris Bronstad

Subjectivity and Methodology in the Arch‘I’ve
Elizabeth J. Vincelette

Composition and Cultural Rhetoric
Alex Hanson, Stephanie Jones, Thomas Passwater, and Noah Wilson

The Death of Professor Jones: Ghosts and Memory in a Small University Archives
Erin Dix

Queering the Archive: Transforming the Archival Process
Lizeth Zepeda

Queer Lives in Archives: Intelligibility and Forms of Memory
Gina Watts

Togetherness with the Past: Literary Pedagogy and the Digital Archive
Madeline B. Gangnes

People of the Stacks: ‘The Archivist’ Character in Fiction
Sharon Wolff

A Reckless Verisimilitude: The Archive in James Ellroy’s Fiction
Bradley J. Wiles

Book Review: Cruising the Library by Melissa Adler (2017)
Kathryn McClain and Jennifer Murray

New Issue: RBM: A Journal of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Cultural Heritage

Vol 19, No 2 (2018)

Editor’s Note

Richard Saunders. “Editor’s Note.”

Research Articles

Cyndi Shein, Hannah E. Robinson, and Hana Gutierrez. “Agility in the Archives: Translating Agile Methods to Archival Project Management.”

Michael L. Taylor. “Special Collections Exhibitions: How They Pay Dividends for Your Library.”

Ryan Prendergast and Kristen Totleben. “Course Design, Images, and the Class-Curated Exhibit.”

Book Reviews

Amy Hildreth Chen. The Pioneer Americanists: Early Collectors, Dealers, and Bibliographers. J. Kevin Graffagnino, Terese M. Austin, Jayne Ptolemy, and Brian Leigh Dunnigan, eds

Jillian Sparks. Debbie Lee and Kathryn Newfont. The Land Speaks: New Voices at the Intersection of Oral and Environmental History.

Michelle Urberg. Digital Library Programs for Libraries and Archives by Aaron D. Purcell. Developing Digital Scholarship, Alison MacKenzie and Lindsey Martin, eds.