CFP: Public Services Quarterly

PUBLIC SERVICES QUARTERLY is always looking for quality submissions.

Public Services Quarterly covers a broad spectrum of public service issues in academic libraries, presenting practical strategies for implementing new initiatives and research-based insights into effective practices. The journal publishes research-based and theoretical articles as well as case studies that advance the understanding of public services, including reference and research assistance, information literacy instruction, access and delivery services, and other services to patrons. Articles may examine creative ways to use technology to assist students and faculty. Practice-based articles are thoroughly grounded in the literature and situate the work done in one library into the larger context.

Manuscript Submissions:  This journal uses ScholarOne Manuscripts to manage submissions and the peer-review process.
To view an online sample copy, go to: www.tandfonline.com/WPSQ

For more information, feel free to contact the editor, editorial board, or columns editors, listed here.

Sian Brannon <Sian.Brannon@unt.edu>

Call for Chapters: Teaching Critical Reading Skills: Strategies for Academic Librarians Published by ACRL Press

Have you created library instructional or outreach activities focused on student reading? If you have case studies, lesson plans, stories, or programmatic approaches aimed at developing active, engaged, mindful, and critical readers, we want to hear from you.

Focus of the Book:

Librarians engage with student reading in a variety of ways: We work with students as they learn to become part of their disciplinary communities and practice reading scholarly articles, interpreting historical information from archival materials, and drawing conclusions based on information from unfamiliar source types like government documents, patents, figures, data, or works of criticism. This book will offer strategies for librarians working across a range of disciplinary areas so they can engage students who need to learn how to read in order to work, understand, and create new knowledge in their field.

We also work with students as they become critical, engaged citizens. We interact with students as they learn to make sense of information in web-based environments where authorship is often uncertain, take active steps to triangulate the information they find, and make decisions based on social media sources where bias and filter bubbles are inherent. We also work with student readers who come from a variety of backgrounds (e.g., non-native English speakers) and who are at different stages in their academic journey (e.g., transfer students or graduate students). This book will offer strategies that take into account librarians’ unique instructional opportunities to encourage students who read in order to understand, empathize, and create change.

Potential Chapter Topics May Include But Are Not Limited To:

  • Critical Reading – Defined and Examples in Practice
  • Primary Source Literacy (i.e., Special Collections and Archives) and Critical Reading
  • Reading for different student audiences – examples could include expert vs. novice approaches, reading instruction for first-year students, transfer students, or graduate students’ reading practices
  • Programmatic Approaches to Reading Programs
  • Community College Librarians and Critical Reading
  • Reading Scholarly Articles
  • Reading Beyond Scholarly Articles
  • Reading Emotionally Difficult Material
  • Reading in the Disciplines (i.e., sciences, social sciences, humanities)
  • Reading for Non-native English Speakers
  • Strategies for comprehending data or health resources
  • Reading strategies for different source types (e.g., opinion pieces, government documents, books…)

Submission Procedure:

Please submit an initial chapter proposal description of up to 500 words and a tentative chapter title. As part of your proposal description, please include a brief description of the practical content you will include in your chapter (e.g., lesson plan, instructional activity, assignment, outreach plan, or model for creating a campus program). Please also include the author(s)’ names, titles, and institutional affiliations, along with a link to current CV (or copy relevant info from your CV, which may be abbreviated to focus on information relevant to your experiences either with instruction and outreach or relevant publishing history).

Please submit proposals to: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSepZQVtqxnLvjRZLdGvhiVIFnIL5JWQFSq79xx0vLQqXdkJCg/viewform?usp=sf_link

Proposals are due by October 1, 2020.** Authors will be notified of their status (accept or decline) by November 15, 2020. A first draft of approximately 2000-5000 words (excluding endnotes and bibliography) will be due on February 15, 2021, and after receiving editorial feedback, a final draft will be due on July 31, 2021. Chapters must not be previously published or simultaneously submitted elsewhere.

**Special note – we very much understand that these are extremely strange and difficult times. If you have an idea but aren’t sure what your schedule looks like for fall/winter, please still contact us to express interest and share your idea. We’ll see what we can figure out together.**

Anticipated book publication date will be early 2022. Chapter authors will be able to make their chapters open access by posting final copies of their chapter in their institutional repositories.

For additional information, contact:

Hannah Gascho Rempel, Professor and Science Librarian, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR  – Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu

Rachel Hamelers, Teaching and Learning Librarian, Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA – rachelhamelers@muhlenberg.edu

CFP: International Conference on Digital Humanities: “Digital Dialogues”

Type: Conference

Date: October 24, 2020 to October 25, 2020

Location: United Kingdom

Subject Fields: Digital Humanities, Humanities, Research and Methodology, Social Sciences, Race Studies

With the epidemic shaking the world and the research/teaching/learning being moved online, the field of Digital Humanities has received unprecedented attention of scholars and professionals. It has become vital to explore its theories, methods and practices and to clarify its multiple possibilities and challenges.

This conference will look at the interaction of humanities and digital technologies and the use of humanities-related digital resources in various fields. It will analyse the ways digital humanities transformed and keep transforming academic environment, local communities and global conversations and the innovative ways of sharing knowledge and teaching it introduced.

We invite proposals from various disciplines including IT, media and communication, design, history, political sciences, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, literature, linguistics, psychology, etc.

Papers are invited on topics related, but not limited, to:

  • practising digital humanities
  • teaching digital humanities
  • digital collections, data and research processes
  • digital humanities across class, race and gender
  • digital humanities as activism and artistic practice
  • digital humanities and cyberculture

Paper proposals up to 250 words and a brief biographical note should be sent by 10 August 2020 to digital.humanities@lcir.co.uk.

The Paper Proposal form could be downloaded from http://digital.humanities.lcir.co.uk/

Registration fee – 90 GBP

The conference will be held online. Papers presented at the conference will be published in a post-conference volume with an ISBN number.

Contact Info:

Dr Olena Lytovka, digital.humanities@lcir.co.uk
Contact Email: digital.humanities@lcir.co.uk
URL: http://digital.humanities.lcir.co.uk/

 

New Issue: RBM

RBM: A Journal of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Cultural Heritage Vol 21, No 1 (2020)

Editor’s Note (this is to you)
Richard Saunders

Research Articles

Toward Inclusive Outreach: What Special Collections Can Learn from Disability Studies
Kevin M. O’Sullivan, Gia Alexander

Early Book Collections and Modern Audiences: Harnessing the Identity/ies of Book Collections as Collective Resources
Leah Tether, Laura Chuhan Campbell

Book Reviews

A Companion to the History of the Book, 2nd edition. Simon Eliot and Jonathan Rose, eds.
Jessie Sherwood

Nicholas S. Paliewicz and Marouf Hasian Jr. The Securitization of Memorial Space: Rhetoric and Public Memory.
Lena Newman

Participatory Archives: Theory and Practice. Edward Benoit, III and Alexandra Eveleigh, eds.
Lauren Goss

Peter Botticelli, Martha R. Mahard, and Michèle V. Cloonan. Libraries, Archives, and Museums Today: Insights from the Field.
Greta Reisel Browning

Laura A. Millar. A Matter of Facts: The Value of Evidence in an Information Age.
Laura J. French

Trusting Records in the Cloud.
Tamara E. Livingston

Recent Issue: Journal of Archival Organization

Journal of Archival Organization Vol. 16. no. 4 (2019)
(subscription)

Original Articles

Faculty Acceptance to Archive in Nigerian Institutional Repositories: A Review
Goodluck Ifijeh, Promise Ilo, Aderonke Asaolu, Juliana Iwu-James & Chidi Segun-Adeniran

Stick to the Script: Automated Creation of XML for EAD Finding Aids
Robert G. Weaver

Assessment of the Status of the Social Media Records: The Case of the Mpumalanga Government, South Africa
N. S. Netshakhuma

Expedited Digital Appraisal for Regular Archivists: An MPLP-Type Appraisal Workflow for Hybrid Collections
Susanne Belovari

Archives and the Law

Where is 108? Possible under-utilization of the Copyright Act’s library and archive-specific exemption from copyright infringement
Stephanie (Cole) Adams

New Issue: Information & Culture

New Issue: Volume 55 Number 2 (June 2020)
(subscription)

From Programming to Products: Softalk Magazine and the Rise of the Personal Computer User
by Laine Nooney, Kevin Driscoll, Kera Allen

Becoming Socialist: Print Culture and the Global Revolutionary Moment, 1880–1914
by Brendan Fay

Deliberation or Manipulation? The Issue of Governmental Information in Sweden, 1969–1973
by Fredrik Norén

The Evolution of the Ethnographic Object Catalog of the Canadian Museum of History, Part 1: Collecting, Ordering, and Transforming Anthropological Knowledge in the Museum, ca. 1879–1960
by Heather Macneil, Jessica Lapp, Nadine Finlay

Digital Cash: The Unknown History of the Anarchists, Utopians, and Technologists Who Created Cryptocurrency by Finn Brunton (review)

The Joy of Search: A Google Insider’s Guide to Going beyond the Basics by Daniel M. Russell (review)

Numbered Lives: Life and Death in Quantum Media by Jacqueline Wernimont (review)

The Oxford History of Popular Print Culture, vol. 5, US Popular Print Culture to 1860 ed. by Ronald J. Zboray and Mary Saracino Zboray (review)

CFP: Library Diversity and Residency Studies

Type: Journal
Date: September 15, 2020
Location: United States
Subject Fields: Library and Information Science, Archival Science
Library Diversity and Residency Studies: Journal Call for Papers

We are pleased to announce a call for papers for the next issue of Library Diversity and Residency Studies (LDRS), an open access, peer-reviewed journal founded and published by a team of librarians and LIS faculty members. LDRS publishes articles that are engaged in the social justice project of increasing diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in the library profession and in LIS curricula.

Journal URL: https://librarydiversity.institute/ldrs/
Author Guidelines: https://librarydiversity.institute/ldrs/author-guidelines/
Link to submit papers: https://librarydiversity.institute/ldrs/submit/

Deadline for submissions to the next issue is: September 15, 2020

LDRS is committed to providing a platform for the publication of work that might otherwise be marginalized from dominant discourses. We welcome work from established authors in the field, and also encourage submissions from new authors. We will prioritize submissions from minoritized voices, including submissions that represent diverse perspectives. We are committed to working with authors during the submission and review process.

We publish high quality, peer-reviewed articles in a range of formats, with a focus on DEI issues and residency programs. While we are open to suggestions for new article types and formats, We expect proposals to include unique and substantial new content from the author and are open to suggestions for new article types and formats. Examples of material we would publish include:

  • articles about particular DEI programs in libraries, with an objective assessment of strengths and weaknesses, the specific impacts of these programs, and strategies by which these programs could be replicated elsewhere;
  • rigorous and original research that includes discussion of implications and an argument for action that makes a unique, significant contribution to the professional literature;
  • articles arguing for a particular approach, strategy or development in librarianship, with practical examples of how it might be achieved;
  • transformative works with additional explanatory or interpretive content. For example, a transcription of an interview or panel discussion, with a substantial introduction explaining the importance of the subject to librarianship and a discussion; and
  • best practices to aid in the retention of librarians from minoritized populations.

Open Access Policy

LDRS is an open access publication. We believe making works that engage with DEI topics freely accessible will support a greater exchange of knowledge and provide the best possibility for change. There are no Article Processing Charges or any other charges associated with publishing in LDRS.

Works are released under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Attribution-NonCommercial license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0), which provides unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Copyright remains with the authors of articles published in LDRS, with the journal retaining a permanent right to display articles in final accepted form. For further details, refer to the LDRS author guidelines (https://librarydiversity.institute/ldrs/author-guidelines/).

CFP: Journal of the Society of North Carolina Archivists

Call for Papers – Deadline – October 20, 2020

J-SNCA is a peer-reviewed journal that seeks to support the theoretical, practical, and scholarly aspects of the archival profession. The editorial board of J-SNCA invites members of the research and archival communities to submit articles for a general issue on archival topics to be published in the Winter of 2020/2021.

Focuses on archival methodology, metadata, collecting practices, outreach, and rethinking the goals of archival work in our current age, especially considering COVID-19 and the national conversation on efforts towards anti-racism are all welcome.

The deadline for article submission is October 1, 2020. All members of the archival community, including students and independent researchers, are welcome to submit articles. If you were slated to present at the cancelled 2020 Society of North Carolina Archivists conference you are particularly encouraged to submit a paper based on your presentation. Contributors need not be members of Society of North Carolina Archivists or live in the state of North Carolina. Article proposals are welcome and encouraged.

Submission guidelines can be found at http://www.ncarchivists.org/publications/journal-ofthesociety-of-north-carolina-archivists-j-snca/manuscript-submission-guidelines/

***Membership is not required for submissions or inclusion in the journal***

Best,
Kristen Merryman
Managing Editor, JSNCA

JCAS Reading Group with Elizabeth Joan Kelly

Details

Tuesday, July 28, 2020 at 1 PM – 2 PM EDT

Hosted by Journal of Contemporary Archival Studies

Online Event

Join us for a Q&A session with JCAS author Elizabeth Joan Kelly about her article “Assessing Impact of Medium-Sized Institution Digital Cultural Heritage on Wikimedia Projects.” Read the article and discuss strategies for increasing access to digital cultural heritage resources.

Download the article: elischolar.library.yale.edu/jcas/vol6/iss1/25

This event is free and will be hosted by the NEA Education Committee using Zoom. Registration is limited to 100 participants.

New Page: Bibliographies

Greetings Readers-

I have often seen people post requests to listservs, social media, or other places for ideas on literature to read on topics. It can be time consuming to do the research to find helpful and relevant information, and often someone else has already done it.

Therefore, I created a new page for Bibliographies. I started with SAA, SAA Sections, and did some other searching to start this compilation. I know there are many, many more out there, so please send me ones you’ve created or ones you know will be helpful to other archivists.

To stay within the goals of this blog, I’m looking for bibliographies that are directly beneficial to archivists, the work we do, and the knowledge we need. Here are some guidelines:

  • Focused on articles, books, and scholarly works
  • Grounded in, but not limited to, archival literature
  • May include works by our allied and related professions
  • May include supplemental resources (e.g. websites, blogs, etc.)
  • Can be in any format: Word, PDF, websites, Zotero, Google Docs, etc.

Have ideas for a topic where a bibliography doesn’t exist? Create one! And if you’re not sure how or where to start, let me know and let’s work together to start one.

I am very open to recommendations – I want this to be a helpful resource for archivists so please be in touch with any ideas.

Contact me with your suggestions!