Call for Chapters: Learning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries

Call for Book Chapter Proposals

Working titleLearning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries

Proposal submission deadline: January 27th, 2020

Editors: Arianne Hartsell-Gundy (Duke University), Kim Duckett (Duke University), Sarah Morris (University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill)

Publisher: Association of College & Research Libraries

Chapter proposals are invited for Learning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries, a book examining how academic librarians can best support interns, graduate assistants, and practicum and field experience students (both LIS and other fields). We welcome proposals focused on philosophical perspectives, practical strategies, reflective essays, and/or case studies. In addition to contributions from staff working in academic libraries, we welcome contributions from LIS faculty and current and recent graduate students.

Proposals are sought for chapters related to the following themes. Proposals should be between 250-300 words, and final chapters will be between 3000-4000 words.

Preparing Graduate Students for Professional Roles

This section will explore how internships, assistantships, practicums, and field experiences can support the learning of graduate students in order to help readers consider how these programs benefit graduate students and how they might want to structure such learning experience in their institutions. We hope to see explorations of skill-based training and discussions of how to most effectively mentor graduate students through hands-on work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • The role of internships, field experiences, and practicums in LIS or other forms of graduate education
  • Developing professional workplace skills (e.g: time management, project management, workplace communication, reflective practice, self-awareness)
  • Preparing graduate students for the job search – job hunting, applying for professional positions, resume development, interview preparation

Logistics & Structures for Designing Graduate Student Work Experiences

This section will look at how to administer these types of positions and programs in order for readers to gain a bigger picture of what it takes to oversee this work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Strategies for structuring learning experiences for students (either programs or individualized experiences)
  • Interviewing, selecting and/or hiring
  • Developing a diverse and inclusive workforce and environment
  • Onboarding and approaches to training
  • Program assessment

Ethical Considerations

This section will examine the complex ethical issues surrounding these types of graduate experiences in order to help the reader consider how they will address these questions in their work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Issues surrounding paid versus unpaid labor
  • Ensuring students receive credit for their work (e.g. course credit, acknowledgement)
  • Issues related to balancing the organization’s needs and students’ learning and professional development needs

Managers’ Perspectives

This section will address the experience of the managers of these work experiences in order to give both new and seasoned managers insight into what these experiences will mean for them.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Tips for mentoring and coaching
  • The first-time manager perspective
  • Emotional labor, boundaries, and self-care
  • How to make it meaningful for you, your work, and your own professional goals

Students’ Perspectives

This section highlights LIS students’ perspectives on positive and negative aspects of their work experiences, and practical advice for making the most out of their internships, assistantships, etc.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Finding and designing meaningful graduate student work experience(s)
  • Strategies for self-advocacy
  • Perspectives on career-preparedness
  • Navigating workplace dynamics as a temporary employee
  • Balancing work responsibilities with coursework and life experiences

Submission Procedure

Proposals should be submitted as a single email attachment to learninginactionlibraries@gmail.com

Proposals should include:

  • Author name(s), institutional affiliation(s), job title(s)
  • Brief description of your experience as a graduate student or working with graduate students in academic libraries
  • Brief statement of your interests in professional writing
  • Clear description of the topic you are proposing for a potential chapter (about 250-300 words)

Important dates:

Proposals due: January 27th, 2020
Authors notified and sent chapter guidelines: March 15th, 2020
Full chapters due: June 29th, 2020
Final revised chapters due: November 16th, 2020

For additional information contact:

Arianne Hartsell-Gundy, Duke University Libraries: arianne.hartsell.gundy@duke.edu

CFP: The Association for Documentary Editing annual meeting

The Association for Documentary Editing invites proposals for sessions at the organization’s annual meeting in Dickinson N.D., June 25-27, 2020

At this year’s ADE meeting, we are eager to discover and discuss the ways in which documentary editors perform at the intersections between editorial work and archival, pedagogical, traditional academic, and digital humanities work.

Conference Theme:

“New Horizons: Breaking/Erasing Boundaries”

Approaches to the theme could include:

  • Crossing Fences: Constituencies, Collaboration, What We Document
  • Digital Frontiers: Publication Platforms, Digital Preservation
  • Old Ways, New Ways: Changes in Pedagogy; Print and/or Digital Editing“New Horizons: Breaking/Erasing Boundaries”

Questions that panels, roundtables, individual papers might consider and address:

  • Are there people working in our field (perhaps reading this call for papers!) who are not editors but who share our interests, benefit from our work, collaborate with us, contribute to our editions? By including them/you in our program, could we expand the constituencies of the ADE?
  • Editorial/archival projects are increasingly collaborative internally, with historians, literary scholars, library staff, and digital humanists working in tandem with editors. Who else uses tools and skillsets like editors? What does “collaboration” mean within born-digital editions and archives?
  • How have current and past editions/archives/digital humanities projects documented the breaking of social/political/literary/ cultural/racial/sexual barriers across time and place?
  • Can aggregated digital publication hubs for micro editions or other new technologies appeal to women, people of color, and others to provide opportunities for documenting un-documented or under-documented marginalized communities, people or events?
  • What are potential solutions to the high costs of publication?
  • How has our own pedagogy changed, and how can editing change what happens in the classrooms or online courses of our disciplines?
  • What will be the impact on editorial training of the new model of the Editing Institute(EI)? What reflections do former graduates or teachers of the Editing Institute have about their experience, and what work has emerged from that experience in the EI?
  • What does “collaboration” mean in the digital humanities classroom? How do innovative archival and editorial projects make their way into the classroom?

The program committee will consider proposals for presentations in a variety of formats, including:

Pre-arranged panel: usually consists of three thematically associated papers, with an optional commentator and chair. A panel can take one of two forms:

  • Individual presentations (typically three) no more than 20 minutes in length.
  • Papers (full length, three to five) pre-circulated to the panel and possibly also on the ADE website. Panelists summarize briefly (10 minutes or less) at the meeting.

In either format, panelists should have questions prepared to engage fellow panelists and the audience in discussions of the common themes and issues raised in and beyond the papers. In the interest of promoting discussion, time limits will be strictly enforced. Thematic panels of product or process demonstrations are also encouraged.

Individual presentation: typically in either format listed under the pre-arranged panel. If accepted, individual presentations will be grouped into panels using one of the formats above.

Roundtable: usually consists of several speakers and addresses topics of broad interest and scope with a defined and pre-circulated list for the participants of guiding questions. The objective should be creating lively debate and active audience participation.

Poster or digital demonstration: both the printed poster format and computer demonstrations of websites or digital projects, especially for works-in-progress. The setting for the poster session will encourage in-person presentation and informal conversation.

Please contact program committee chair Constance B. Schulz [schulz@sc.edu] if you have questions about the stated theme or formats. Each finished proposal should comprise an abstract of no more than 500 words, including a statement of preferred format; and name, email address, and any relevant institutional or edition affiliation for each presenter. Please send your proposal to the same email address as an attachment (Word, plain text, PDF, Open Office) with the words “ADE 2020 Program Proposal” in the subject line by February 29, 2020.(Happy Leap Year Day!) Those who prefer to use the U.S. mail or a FAX can send proposals to Schulz c/o Department of History, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, or FAX 803-777-4494.

2020 Program Committee: Constance Schulz, Noelle Baker, Tom Downey, Patricia Kalayjian, David Nolan

The meeting, hosted by the Theodore Roosevelt Center at Dickinson State University, will be held at the Ramada Grand Dakota Hotel from June 25-27, 2020.

Call for Nominations: SAA Preservation Publication Award

The Society of American Archivists Preservation Publication Award Subcommittee is seeking nominations for the prestigious Preservation Publication Award.

Do you know of an outstanding preservation-related work published in 2019? Would you like to see the author(s) or editor(s) recognized for contributing to preservation and the archives profession?

Please consider submitting a nomination prior to the deadline of February 28, 2020.

The nomination form is available at https://app.smarterselect.com/programs/45677-Society-Of-American-Archivists

Additional information can be found at www2.archivists.org/governance/handbook/section12-preservation   I encourage you to check out the list of previous winners at the bottom of this page. Past winners have published important works on a wide range of preservation topics, including general archives and electronic records preservation, special media conservation, facilities standards for archives, and emergency preparedness and response.

Here is some additional information about the award from the SAA website:

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Established in 1993, this award recognizes and acknowledges the author(s) or editor(s) of an outstanding published work relating to archives preservation and, through this acknowledgement, encourages outstanding achievement by others. The work can be an article, report, chapter, or monograph in an audiovisual, electronic or print format.

The work must contribute to the advancement of the theory and practice of preservation in archives institutions by introducing new preservation theories, methods, or techniques; by codifying principles and practices of archives preservation; by presenting the results of innovative research on matters related to archives preservation; by investigating preservation issues of current interest and importance to the archives community; or by studying aspects of the history of archives profession.

Eligibility:

Awarded to the author(s) or editor(s) of an outstanding preservation- related work that is of relevance to the North American archives community and published during the preceding calendar year.

Please feel free to contact me, or any other member of the Preservation Publication Award Subcommittee, directly with any questions you may have about the nomination process.

Sincerely,
Karla Irwin
karla.irwin@unlv.edu
SAA Preservation Publication Award Subcommittee, Chair

Fall/Winter 2019 Issue of American Archivist

Half of the content—including 11 articles and reviews—from the latest American Archivist is now online! Articles examine the roles of archivists and catalogers, consider virtual reality experiences for archival collections, reflect on the adoption of EAD twenty years later, highlight a case study for reassessing audiovisual materials, and more. Start reading now (you’ll need to log in to access the issue).

There’s more in the pipeline. The journal is experimenting with “advance article publication,” meaning that content will continue to be published online as it becomes available for this issue. The print edition, which will include the volume index, is projected to be available by March. View the entire table of contents for the issue.

New Journal: Unbound: A Journal of Digital Scholarship

from the Digital Humanities Discussion Group (ALA):

Hello, Everyone:

I’m excited this morning to announce the launch of Unbound: A Journal of Digital ScholarshipUnbound publishes work that explores the interstices of digital scholarship, broadly conceived, with an emphasis on digital cultural studies; critical digital humanities; galleries, libraries, archives, and museums; the interpretive social sciences; and socially engaged computational or quantitative methods. This open access journal publishes editorials, essays, reviews, pedagogy and praxis notes (short form works on research in progress, single-institution case studies, and pedagogy), and new media art, music, and performance portfolios. We welcome submissions from scholars and professionals at all stages of professional development in all fields.

In addition to publishing original scholarship, Unbound is the venue for the proceedings of the Digital Frontiers conference, and related satellite events. The first issue features essays and abstracts from Realizing Resistance: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Star Wars, Episodes VII, VIII & IX, which took place May 2-4, 2019 at the University of North Texas.

I am joined on the Editorial Board by John Edward Martin (UNT), Leigh Bonds (Ohio State), Jenn Stayton (UNT), Kevin Jenkins (Penn State), Adetty Pérez de Miles (Texas State), Joshua Jackson (North Carolina State), and Brea Henson (UNT). The journal is published by Digital Frontiers and hosted by the University of North Texas Libraries.
The Call for Contributions is now open, and guidelines are also available for proposing special issues.

Please join me in celebrating this event, and please share the Call for Contributions generously.

With Warm Regards,
Spencer D. C. Keralis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Digital Humanities Librarian
Liaison: Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities
University of Illinois Urbana Champaign
spencerk@illinois.edu
Pronouns: he/they
ORCID: 0000-0003-0903-5587

Call for Participants and Presentations: SAA Research Forum

Call for Participants and Presentations

Society of American Archivists
2020 Research Forum
“Foundations and Innovations”

Tuesday, August 4 | 9:00 am–5:00 pm
Hilton Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

Archivists from around the country and the world will convene at ARCHIVES*RECORDS 2020, the Joint Annual Meeting of the Council of State Archivists and the Society of American Archivists in Chicago, August 2-8, 2020. If you’re engaged in research, seeking to identify research-based solutions for your institution, willing to participate in the research cycle by serving as a site for research trials, or simply interested in what’s happening in research and innovation, join us in Chicago for the 14th annual SAA Research Forum: “Foundations and Innovations!”

Researchers, practitioners, educators, students, and the curious across all sectors of archives and records management are invited to participate. Use the Forum to discuss, debate, plan, organize, evaluate, or motivate research projects and initiatives. Here’s your chance to find collaborators or to help inform colleagues about questions and problems that need to be tackled. The Forum features the full spectrum of research activities—from “pure” research to applied research to innovative practice—all of interest and value to the archival community.

Call for Platform and Poster Presentations

The 2020 Research Forum will feature a full day of presentations and posters on Tuesday, August 4, from 9am- 5pm. SAA invites submission of abstracts (of 250 words or fewer) for 10-minute platform or brief lightning presentations, or participation in the poster session. Topics may address research or innovations in any aspect of archives practice or records management in government, corporate, academic, scientific, or other setting. Presentations on research results that may have emerged since the Joint Annual Meeting Call for Proposals deadline are welcome, as are reports on research completed within the past three years that you think is relevant and valuable for discussion. Please indicate whether you intend a platform, lightning, or poster presentation.

The organizers encourage submissions for the Research Forum that address

1) diversity and inclusion and/or

2) models for collaboration across domains (archives, libraries, galleries, and museums).

Abstracts will be evaluated by a review committee co-chaired by Dr. Nance McGovern (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and Dr. Heather Soyka (Kent State University).

Important Dates

Submission form available: February 1 to May 1

Submission deadline: May 1

Notification to submitters: July 1

Deadline for accepted submitters to finalize Abstract and Bio: July 15

Accepted poster presenters upload poster image: August 1

All submitters will be notified of the review committee’s decision by July 1 (in advance of the Early-Bird registration deadline). The submission link will be live on http://archivists.org/proceedings/research-forum from February 1 until the submission deadline on May 1.

Please be sure to include:  Presentation title, your name and affiliation, email address, and whether your proposal is for a platform or poster presentation. Contact organizers prior to the notification deadline (July 1) if you have submitted and determine that you will not be able to attend.

For ideas or to learn more about past Forums, see the 2007-2019 proceedings at http://archivists.org/proceedings/research-forum.

Questions? Contact the organizers at researchforum@archivists.org – and watch for updates on the Forum’s webpage at http://archivists.org/proceedings/research-forum.

Podcast: Tales from the Archive

Brought to you by Preservica, the Tales from the Archive series delivers behind the scenes access to the archives from some of the worlds the best known organisations. Journey with us as we explore how the corporate archive has become the trusted source of critical long-term business records and brand assets.

The series features guest speakers who are using digital preservation to ensure they can quickly respond to compliance and litigation challenges and unlock the value of their brand heritage.