Travel Scholarship: Bernard Becker Medical Library

The Bernard Becker Medical Library is now accepting applications for the Archives and Rare Books Spring/Summer 2018 travel scholarship.  Researchers living more than 100 miles from St. Louis are eligible to apply for this award of up to $1,000 to help defray the costs of travel, lodging, food, and other expenses associated with using our collections.  Information about Becker Library’s archival and rare book holdings can be found at

For more information and to apply for the travel scholarship, please see…

Thank you.
Stephen A. Logsdon, MA, MLIS
Head of Archives
Bernard Becker Medical Library

New/Recent Books

Information Systems: Process and Practice
Edited by Christine Urquhart, Faten Hamad, Dina Tbaishat, and Alison Yeoman

The Stuff of Bits: An Essay on the Materialities of Information 
by Paul Douris

Capturing Our Stories: An Oral History of Librarianship in Transition
A. Arro Smith

The Silence of the Archive
David Thomas, Simon Fowler, and Valerie Johnson

Creating Exhibits That Engage: A Manual for Museums and Historical Organizations
John Summers

Cultural Heritage Care and Management: Theory and Practice
edited by Cecilia Lizama Salvatore

Things Great and Small: Collections Management Policies, Second Edition
John E. Simmons

Commemoration: The American Association for State and Local History Guide
edited by Seth C. Bruggeman

An American Association for State and Local History Guide to Making Public History
edited by Bob Beatty

Fostering Empathy Through Museums
edited by Elif M. Gokcigdem

Practical Preservation and Conservation Strategies for Libraries
Brian J. Baird, illustrated by Jody Brown

Directory of Rare Book and Special Collections in the UK and Republic of Ireland, 3rd edition
edited by Karen Attar

Linked Data for Cultural Heritage
edited by Ed Jones and Michele Seikel

Open Licensing for Cultural Heritage
Gill Hamilton and Fred Saunderson

Valuing Your Collection: A practical guide for museums, libraries and archives
Freda Matassa

Library Publishing Curriculum Available Online

This is not archives specific. However, for anyone interested in the library’s role in publishing, which continues to increase (primarily in academia), this might be of interest.


The Developing A Curriculum to Advance Library-Based Publishing project, generously funded by the Institute for Museum and Library Services, is developing a set of curriculum modules that will form the basis of a suite of synchronous and asynchronous professional development offerings for librarians in this growing area. The first two modules are now freely available to professors, workshop instructors, and trainers of all kinds on the project websiteContent and Impact. These modules are openly licensed, so we encourage you to share, adopt, and adapt them! Learn more about this release.

Digital Humanities Reading List

Though this list is mostly for libraries and scholarly communication, archives intersects at points.

LIBER’s Digital Humanities & Digital Cultural Heritage Working Group is gathering literature for libraries with an interest in digital humanities. Four teams, each with a specific focus, have assembled a list of must-read papers, articles and reports.

Digital Humanities Reading List Part 1

Digital Humanities Reading List Part 2

Digital Humanities Reading List Part 3

(part 4 coming soon)

Call for Book Reviewers: Oral History Review

By Nancy MacKay, Book Review Editor

Did you know that the Oral History Review, the journal of the Oral History Association, publishes 30-40 book reviews in every issue?

And that each book reviewed first must be identified as relevant to oral history; then read, analyzed and written about by volunteer scholars in the OHA community?

And that once the review is submitted to the journal, it undergoes a rigorous review and editing process before emerging in print in the form you see when you sit down with your copy of Oral History Review?

I did not know the extent or the scholarly rigor of this process until I assumed the role as book review editor in January.  As a reviewer I had taken all these steps for granted. Now I understand the effort that goes into scanning new publications for potential review books and matching a book to a volunteer reviewer. And each of those reviewers does serious work in reading and analyzing each book for fellow OHA members.

I now know that the quality of the book review section is maintained through wide community participation. I’m calling out to potential reviewers, seasoned reviewers and authors to get involved by suggesting book titles for review and participating as a reviewer. Reviewers can select books of interest to review and their desired level of activity through a form. Anyone can recommend a title for review. To get started, please contact me at

Call for Book Chapter Proposals: Becoming a Practitioner-Researcher: A Practical Guide for Information Professionals

Thank you to Caryn Radick for passing this on!

Dear colleagues,
We are soliciting chapter proposals for our forthcoming ACRL book, Becoming a Practitioner-Researcher: A Practical Guide for Information Professionals [working title]This book will gather practical advice from practitioners conducting research as part of their tenure or professional responsibilities at academic, public, and special libraries, and/or archives. We are seeking chapters from novice or seasoned practitioner-researchers who want to share their experiences in executing research and/or evaluation projects.

Focus of the Book:
This edited volume will address the challenges of undertaking research and offers support and advice for all stages of a project, from writing the proposal to collecting the data, to disseminating the findings whether it be an internal report or published journal article, and the myriad pitfalls that may occur in between.

Rather than focusing solely on methods, this book tackles issues such as balancing research project and work responsibilities, scaling your project to fit your budget and time constraints, collaborating with a partner or team, and other issues that impact projects. Our vision for this book is to curate an edited volume of insights that we wish we would have known when we embarked on our own research projects. Chapters will introduce and discuss a specific project in a specific institution, in order to frame the discussion of the aspects of the research process the chapter addresses. The narrative should be reflective and discuss what can be generalized about the experience that would be helpful for other practitioners in a “lessons learned” approach.

Part 1: The Research Process (starting your research, crafting a proposal, figuring out logistics)
Part 1 is about creating a holistic approach to undertaking research in a library or archive setting. We are seeking chapters that include sections addressing topics such as, but not limited to:

  • Developing an idea into a research proposal
  • Obtaining administrative buy-in and support
  • Budgeting (time, money, personnel)
  • Choosing a research design and data collection method
  • Navigating the IRB process
  • Deciding on the scale of a project and what is feasible
  • Analyzing your data
  • Sharing research (reports, formal outlets including journals)

We chose the term holistic because we feel the chapters should integrate several of the above bullet points when reflecting on research project experiences in the context of their library.

Part 2: Social Research Methods for Information Professionals (survey, content analysis observation studies, focus group, interviews, etc.) 
Part 2 is about the application of common research methods found in the library literature. Chapters should revolve around creating a research design and reflect on the realities of research practice, conveying to readers methods that worked well for particular contexts and projects. Each chapter in Part 2 will include sections on how the particular method was applied, the institutional context, and the bumps and bruises of going from research design to data collection. Please address these sections in your proposal if you are seeking inclusion in Part 2.
Potential topics include:

  • Surveys
  • Focus groups
  • Ethnographic methods (observation, visual, storytelling)
  • Interviews
  • Document/content/textual analysis

Part 3: Managing a Research Project (individual researchers and team-based collaboration)
Part 3 will bring into focus the experiences of individual researchers and teams. The purpose of this section is to provide readers a range of basic and complex project examples and how these projects have been managed by individual practitioners or collaborative teams.
Example topics for inclusion in a chapter:

  • Project management as a solo researcher
  • How teams determine responsibilities for a project
  • Cleaning and analysis of data as a team
  • Collaborating on cross-institutional projects
  • Publishing or writing as a team
  • Short reflective essays by individuals who have been both solo researchers and on a research team

Don’t see your topic here? Contact the editors at to discuss how your idea may fit within this book’s scope.

Proposal Guidelines:
To submit a proposal,  fill out the short Survey Monkey form and attach your proposal as a Word document (.doc or .docx). The form will require author names, job titles, and institutional affiliations. The Word document for the proposal itself should be written in Times New Roman, 12 pt., be double-spaced, and include:

  • A working title for your chapter
  • A 500-word description and chapter outline including topic keywords.
  • Authors must indicate which part of the book your chapter will address: Part 1: The Research Process, Part 2: Social Research Methods for Information Professionals, or Part 3: Managing a Research Project.
  • Authors will include one or two summary sentences that make explicit the chapter’s major themes, ideas, and learning outcomes.
  • Do not use any identifying information in your proposal (e.g., do not include author names or institution names in the Word doc).
  • Citations should follow the Endnotes-Bibliography format in the Chicago Manual of Style (17th edition).

Proposals are due by Friday, April 13, 2018 at 11:59PM PST and must be submitted via online form:

  • Contributors will be notified of their status (acceptance or rejection) within 6–8 weeks of the due date of proposals.
  • The first draft of chapters will be due in August 2018.
  • Estimated length of chapter: 2,500–4,000 words.
  • Projected publication date: Summer 2019.

Should you need to contact the editors, use the following email address: Bookmark the Google site:

Thank you,
Lee Ann Fullington (Health Sciences Librarian, Brooklyn College/CUNY)
Brandon K. West (Head of Research Instruction Services, SUNY Geneseo)
Frans Albarillo (Social Sciences Librarian, Brooklyn College/CUNY)

Job Announcement: Associate Editor, The Papers of the Revolutionary Era Pinckney Statesmen

The University of South Carolina Department of History seeks an Associate Editor to assist in the editing and preparation of the digital edition of the Papers of the Revolutionary Era Pinckney Statesmen.**

Minimum qualification: MA in American History or closely related field, experience in scholarly editing.

Preferred qualifications: ABD or PhD in American History or closely related field, with knowledge of early national South Carolina history, diplomatic history, or military history. A reading and translation ability in French or Spanish is desirable but not required.

Responsibilities include:

  • Researching new documents, creating original transcriptions of texts, and verification (proofreading) of transcriptions of texts against source document for accuracy and formatting.
  • Conducting detailed research for annotation (broader subjects as well as identifications and cross references); drafting and editing of annotation and editorial notes.
  • Entry of texts and annotation information and citations into the DocTracker database system
  • Assisting Project Director with grant applications and grant reports
  • Assisting in preparation of digital files for publisher.
  • Supervising student workers and/or interns.

Job is posted at the University of South Carolina jobs website, . Position will remain open until filled.

**This is a full-time temporary position ending on September 30, 2020 with possibility of extension.