Job Announcement: Assistant Editor, The Papers of Andrew Jackson

The University of Tennessee-Knoxville seeks a Research Assistant Professor of History to serve as Assistant Editor on The Papers of Andrew Jackson.  The Jackson project is producing a comprehensive edition of Jackson’s papers in seventeen bound volumes and two digital iterations.  Volume XI, covering the presidential year 1833, is now in press, and Volume XII, covering 1834, is in preparation.  The new Assistant Editor will engage in all aspects of the project’s work, including accessioning, selecting, calendaring, transcribing, and annotating documents for inclusion in the volumes, proofreading and indexing volume text, managing the project’s online presence, and coordinating with the digital edition hosts.  Qualifications include a PhD in American history with a pertinent research specialty and advanced literary skills.

Salary is competitive and includes University benefits.  Review of applications will begin April 1 and continue until the position is filled.  Candidates should submit an application letter, current vita, a recent article- or chapter-length writing sample, and contact information for two references at http://apply.interfolio.com/60510.  Inquiries may be directed to Professor Daniel Feller at dfeller@utk.edu or 865-974-7077.

The University of Tennessee is an EEO/AA/Title VI/Title IX/Section/504/ADA/ADEA institution in the provision of its education and employment programs and services.  All qualified applicants will receive equal consideration for employment and admission without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, pregnancy, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, physical or mental disability, genetic information, veteran status, and parental status.

CFP: The Memorial Museum in the Digital Age

Call for Contributors

E-book: The Memorial Museum in the Digital Age

The Memorial Museum in the Digital Age will be the first comprehensive review of thinking and practice related to the effects and affects of the digital for memorial museums. This type of commemorative and educational space has traditionally contained object-heavy displays to stand-in for people, cultures and things that have been destroyed. Whilst some critics believe that such exhibitions help provide a tangible ‘bridge between past and present’ (Joanne Hansen-Glucklich 2014) with objects, others have argued that they create ‘the illusion of simultaneity’ (Andrew Hoskins 2003), i.e. as if we can experience the past in the now. As Paul Williams (2007) contests, objects in the memorial museum can only ever point to the absent. This edited collection seeks to interrogate the impact the introduction of digital practices has had on these traditionally object-heavy spaces. It aims to bring together the voices of academics, archivists, activists and curators to explore questions such as:

  • How does the digital alter our relationship with things that remind us about loss and their association with the past through remediation?
  • To what extent can the digital expand the space of the memorial museum towards the ‘museum without walls’? What are the political and ethical consequences of this particularly in places where destruction of people, cultures and artefacts is ongoing?
  • To what extent are digital tools being used to interrogate spaces of contested memory?
  • How are memorial museums engaging with digital technologies? What are the challenges and opportunities of emerging platforms?
  • To what extent do concepts such as ‘the virtual’, ‘(im)materiality’, ‘loss’ and ‘interactivity’ inform uses of the digital in memorial museums and related archives?
  • To what extent can the digital offer opportunities for alternative, non-professional voices to produce, record and distribute memory of atrocities?
  • How might digital technologies challenge, change and expand our notion of what is meant by the ‘memorial museum’?
  • Where is the digital not being used and why?
  • How might the digital be used to resist practices of forgetting perpetuated by official State, national and transnational memorialisation?
  • How are visitors and the general public using digital technologies to continue or obstruct memorialisation?

Whilst there is a growing number of publications interested in museums and the digital, the specificity of the memorial museum – usually dedicated to the remembrance of people, cultures and places now destroyed – raises particular concerns relating to preservation, materiality, ethics and absence that require careful consideration in the digital age.

Academics including PhD students, museum researchers, curators, activists and archivists are encouraged to propose an abstract. Ideally, the edited collection aims to include chapters that cover a range of examples from across the world and in relation to a diverse range of genocides, conflicts, histories of slavery and colonialism, and disasters, and hopes to include theoretical pieces as well as discussions about the practices of using digital technologies in memorial museums.

Please send abstracts of 200-350 words with a short bio (no more than 150 words) to v.walden@sussex.ac.uk by March 20th2019. Finished articles would be 6,000-8,000 words in length and ETA delivery time on these will be late August 2019. If you have any queries, do not hesitate to get in contact before the deadline. In the spirit of open access and speaking across disciplines, the manuscript will be published as a free e-book. The proposal has already attracted the interest of an appropriate UK university-based publisher.

Given the e-book format, it may be possible to include video, image or interactive content to which you have the right to publish. Less traditional formats of publication are encouraged and can be discussed with the publisher at the stage of abstract submission. Please note the language of the publication will be English.

New Issue: Journal of Western Archives

Volume 10, Issue 1, Diversity, Inclusion, and Cultural Competency Special Issue

From the Editor

Introduction
Helen Wong Smith

Articles

Archivist-in-Residence: Advocating and Managing Archival Diversity Residency Opportunities in University Archives and Special Collections
Angela Fritz

Seeking Grace: Reconstructing the History of African American Alumnae at the University of Denver
Katherine Crowe

The Doorway from Heart to Heart: Diversity’s Stubbornly Persistent Illusion
Terry Baxter

The Cost of Care and the Impact on the Archives Profession
Alexis Braun Marks, Rachael Dreyer, Jennifer Johnson, and Michelle Sweetser

Voices from Drug Court: Partnering to Bring Historically Excluded Communities into the Archives
Randy Williams and Jennifer Duncan

Utah State University’s Cache Valley Latinx Voices Project: Social Justice in the Archives
Randy Williams, Eduardo Ortiz, and Maria Luisa Spicer-Escalante

Case Studies

When Building Namesakes Have Ties to White Supremacy: A Case Study of Oregon State University’s Building Names Evaluation Process
Natalia M. Fernández

Understanding My Home: The Potential for Affective Impact and Cultural Competence in Primary Source Literacy
Jaycie Vos and Yadira Guzman

New Issue: Information & Culture

Volume 54 Number 1 : Special Issue
(subscription)

Editor’s Note: Curated Issue of Information & CultureA Journal of History

Ciaran Trace
p. 1-3

“This special issue of Information & Culture brings together a curated set of previously published articles from the last two decades of the journal’s more than fifty-year history. These articles represent the wide scope of actors, disciplines, and viewpoints that have helped make the journal the space in which to frame and debate the nature of the information domain from a historical perspective. In new and thought-provoking essays accompanying the original articles, the authors look back on the contribution that these articles made to the intellectual life and growth of the journal and its subject matter.”

Revisiting Archival History

Richard J. Cox
p. 4-11

The Failure or Future of American Archival History: A Somewhat Unorthodox View

Richard J. Cox
Originally published: Volume 35, Number 1, 2000
p. 12-26

The quality of research on American archival history has been uneven and the quantity not very impressive. This essay reviews some of the highlights of American archival history research, especially the growing interest in cultural and public history that has produced some studies of interest to scholars curious about the history of archives. The essay also focuses more on why such research still seems so far removed from the interests of most archivists. The essay will consider some hopeful signs, such as the reemergence of records and recordkeeping systems as a core area for study, for a renewed emphasis on American archival history. While much needs to be done, I am optimistic that the golden age of historical research on American archives lies ahead.

Back to the Future of Library History

Jonathan Rose
p. 27-32

Alternative Futures for Library History

Jonathan Rose
Originally published: Volume 38, NUmber 1, Winter 2003
p. 50-60

In response to a recent article by Donald Davis and John Aho, “Whither Library History?” Jonathan Rose discusses six possible alternatives for the future of library history. Library historians can either continue to produce a traditional kind of library history or reframe their subject as a subfield of information science, mainstream history, or the history of the book. They can also adopt the models of such critical theorists as Antonio Gramsci and Michel Foucault. Rose argues for a sixth option: to make library history a part of the new academic discipline of book studies.

Still Breathing: History in Education for Librarianship

Christine Pawley
p 44-52

History in the Library and Information Science Curriculum: Outline of a Debate

Christine Pawley
Originally published: Volume 40, Number  3, Summer 2005
p. 223-238

Only a small minority of Library and Information Science (LIS) schools now schedule courses with a historical focus, and LIS faculty whose research specialty is history seem to be a vanishing breed. Yet some educators are committed to finding ways to preserve historical perspectives in the master’s degree curriculum. At the 2004 conference of the Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE) the Historical Perspectives Special Interest Group (SIG) discussed strategies and subsequently carried on the debate in an online forum. Theoretical justifications for including history in the curriculum appealed to both generalist and specific rationales that argued for “history as story” as well as “history as process,” while practical suggestions included focusing on the preservation of documents, adopting the principles and methods of public history, and creating stronger avenues for collaboration among all historians of libraries and information science, no matter what their disciplinary affiliation. Overall, participants felt that in the current economic climate modestly
scaled efforts stood the best chance of success.

Information History: Searching for Identity

William Aspray
p. 69-75

The History of Information Science and Other Traditional Information Domains: Models for Future Research

William Aspray
Originally published: Volume 46, Number 2, 2011
p. 230-248

“It has been said that the historian is the avenger, and that standing as a judge between the parties and rivalries and causes of bygone generation she can lift up the fallen and beat down the proud, and by his exposures and his verdicts, his satire and his moral indignation, can punish unrighteousness, avenge the injured or reward the innocent.”

—Herbert Butterfield, The Whig Interpretation of History (1931)

Revisiting “Shaping Information History as an Intellectual Discipline”

James W. Cortada
p. 95-101

Shaping Information History as an Intellectual Discipline

James W. Cortada
Originally published: Volume 47, Number 2, 2012
p. 119-144

Information is an emerging field of interest and concern to citizens, public officials, and scholars in many disciplines. This article acknowledges that problems exist in defining the subject of information history and argues the case that the topic can be addressed in a more coherent fashion. It then poses five questions for historians to investigate with respect to this field and proposes a sequence of three strategies and an agenda for what scholars can do to make this topic a new field of inquiry called “information history,” drawing upon the historiographical experiences of other areas of historical inquiry.

Contributors

p. 127-131

This issue of Information & Culture is now available on Project Muse.

Seeking Editors-at-large for American Archivist Reviews Portal

The Society of American Archivists is looking for two Editors-at-large to contribute to the American Archivist Reviews Portal. The Portal includes information about professional products and services, and the reviews complement and expand on content published in the reviews section of American Archivist. These are volunteer positions and work in collaboration with the Reviews Editor and the Reviews Portal Coordinator.

The Editors-at-large of American Archivist Reviews Portal will write reviews focusing on Web-based tools, software, and apps; exhibits; digital humanities projects; reports and white papers; and archives and archivists in pop culture and society. The Editors-at-large will focus on the following:

  • Identifying web-based tools, software, apps, exhibits, and other pertinent resources and subjects for archives and archivists for prospective review;

  • Researching and writing approximately one review every other month;

  • Work with the Reviews Editor and Portal Coordinator during the writing and revision process;

  • Collaborating in the growth and expansion of the site;

  • Keeping abreast of technology reviews in other archival and allied professional periodicals.

Candidates must be a member of SAA, demonstrate solid writing skills, and have an unquenchable curiosity about web-based archives “stuff.” New professionals are encouraged to apply. Ideally, the successful candidates would begin in May 2019. The estimated time commitment is 5 hours/month. The term of the positions is two years with the possibility for reappointment.

TO APPLY: Please send letter indicating why you are interested in the position and explaining your writing and editorial experience, along with your résumé and writing samples (preferably a review or blog post), by March 31, 2019 to: Bethany Anderson, Reviews Editor, American ArchivistReviewsEditor@archivists.org. Interviews will be conducted via telephone in mid-April.

500 posts!

This is the Publishing in the Archives Profession’s 500th post! Just seemed like a landmark to acknowledge.

When I started this blog almost four years ago, I wondered if I’d be able to keep it up. My original goal was to post more guidance about writing, and I still hope to get back to that (once I finish my book). But it’s surprised me how many publishing-related announcements there are. I thought those would be occasional, but now I can post something pretty much every weekday (I purposely don’t post on the weekends).

I really enjoy finding these announcements about calls for papers, new publications, awards, and everything else. It is often amazing to me how much is out there related to archives, though I often wonder what else I’m missing. I find these announcements by following dozens of blogs and websites, periodically reviewing journals’ and publishers’ websites, Google alerts, Facebook posts, and listservs. I’m continually adding to these to ensure I find as much as possible to share (and I welcome recommendations!).

Mostly, I’m grateful for all of you! I appreciate everyone who reads and follows this blog. And I’m especially grateful when I hear that you read it and find it useful.

Thank you and I look forward to 500 more!

CFP: Journal of the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives

Dear colleagues —

I am happy to announce a call for papers for the Journal of the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives, Issue no. 50.

Important Dates

April 15, 2019: Full article submission deadline

June 15, 2019: Journal release

Editor: Bertram Lyons (editor@iasa-web.org)

General Call for Papers

IASA Journal invites proposals covering general topics of interest to the sound and audiovisual archives communities throughout the world. Articles, reviews, essays, and technical documents are welcome.

Issue no. 50 Special Considerations:

In IASA’s 50th year, we coincidentally will release the 50th issue of the IASA Journal! We encourage submissions that respond to critical issues for audiovisual archives today:

* Degradation in legacy physical collections, especially magnetic carriers

* Obsolescence of playback equipment and strategies for acquiring spare parts for playback machines

* Selecting sustainable and compatible target codecs and wrappers for A-to-D video reformatting projects

* Strategies for handling the proliferation of born-digital audiovisual formats and codecs

* Planning for the necessary technical infrastructure needed to ingest and manage the large digital collections being created and acquired at sound and audiovisual archives worldwide

* Intellectual property rights

* Metadata strategies for time-based media objects

* Providing meaningful and useful access to sound and audiovisual collections for researchers of all kinds and in all locations

Please consider submitting an article covering one of these topics or the results of independent research that would be of interest to the IASA membership and the international audiovisual archives community in general.

About the IASA Journal

The Journal of the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives represents the collected research and applied work of the global audiovisual archives community. Also known as the IASA Journal, it is published in issues bi-annually and available as an open-access Journal online (https://journal.iasa-web.org). The IASA Journal uses a double-blind peer-review methodology (the authors do not know who reviews their papers, and reviewers do not know who wrote the papers they are reviewing).

The IASA Journal is constantly looking for material to publish. Please submit articles, research output, or reviews you consider of interest to IASA via the online submission page (http://journal.iasa-web.org/pubs/about/submissions).

Information for Authors

Authors need to register (http://journal.iasa-web.org/pubs/user/register) with the journal prior to submitting or, if already registered, can simply login (http://journal.iasa-web.org/pubs/login) and begin the five-step process.

1. You will be informed of IASA’s intention to review the article no more than one week after your submission.

2. Soft copy as a .doc or .rtf or .txt file should be submitted with minimal formatting.

3. Illustrations (photographs, diagrams, tables, maps, etc) may be submitted as low resolution files placed in the file or sent separately. Once the article has been accepted for publication, high resolution copies will be required and should be sent as separate documents.

4. Use footnotes not endnotes.

5. Use in-text referencing, and all references should be listed at the end of the article in alphabetic order and chronologically for each author. Both should adhere to Harvard style guidelines for references (quick review here: http://www.citethisforme.com/harvard-referencing).

6. Authors are encouraged to submit original research or to develop their conference presentations into more detailed accounts and/or arguments for publication in the journal.

7. Abstracts (maximum 250 words each) must be included with each submission and may be in French, German, Spanish, or English.

Copyright Notice: Unless stated otherwise, authors license their work under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Signed articles and reviews represent the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the policies of the Association.

Please contact editor@iasa-web.org with any questions.

Thanks, and best —

Bertram Lyons, Editor, IASA Journal