Call for Contributors: Transforming the Authority of the Archive: Undergraduate Pedagogy and Critical Digital Archives

Co-editors, Charlotte Nunes (Lafayette College Libraries) and Andi Gustavson (Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin)

We seek abstract proposals for contributions to an edited collection exploring how archives-based undergraduate pedagogy transforms the institutional authority of the archive.  We are proposing the collection to the peer-reviewed, open-access, digitally-native Lever Press in association with Fulcrum, a scholarly communications platform that allows for flexible multimedia research publication.  As such, we welcome contributions that may involve multiple media formats.

This edited collection will include perspectives from educators, archivists (both community- and institutionally-affiliated), and undergraduates involved in efforts to deconstruct and transform the institutional authority of the archive.  We will examine how these efforts and the evolving core values of higher education mutually influence each other.  How can emergent best practices in community-based digital archiving inform productive shifts in undergraduate pedagogy?  How can we transform our pedagogy to better prepare students to ethically engage with the digital archives they encounter and create?  And how can these transformations newly express the core values of higher education?

We seek contributions that frame archives-based pedagogy in terms of opportunities for students to find value in difference, seek equity, and practice collaboration. Contributions might touch on:

  • strategies for exposing students to critical debates in the archives field about access and discovery, community-led archiving, redescription efforts, metadata standards, deaccessioning protocols, etc.

  • practices to encourage critical engagement with the ethical challenges posed by working with digital archives: where are the gaps and absences in the digital record, what are the barriers to access, and what are the potential gains and risks of placing primary sources in digital environments?

  • projects that read archives against the grain in order to highlight perspectives that have not historically been centered in collection-building, but that are very much present in the archives.

  • collaborations to build more comprehensive collections where gaps and silences exist.

  • challenges and opportunities presented by the digital realm, which reduces barriers to access in some areas while raising new barriers in others.

Other topics contributors might address include (but are not limited to):

  • Postcustodial archives and pedagogy

  • Trauma-informed pedagogy and approaches to teaching and building digital archives that reflect histories of violence

  • Critical data modeling of archival collections

  • Teaching computational methods to surface patterns at scale in digital archival collections; “collections as data

  • Building sustainable collaborations between classrooms and community partners that extend beyond the single term

  • The rights of student collaborators on public-facing digital archival projects

  • Challenges and opportunities for students learning in new digital environments

Contributions will be prioritized for inclusion that include perspectives from current or former undergraduate collaborators, or that include these collaborators as co-authors.  Please send 300-500 word abstracts to co-editors Charlotte Nunes (nunesc@lafayette.edu) and Andi Gustavson (agustavson@utexas.edu).  Review of abstracts will begin April 1, 2019.

See also our MLA 2020 Special Session CFP, Transformative Archives-Based Pedagogy, deadline March 18, 2019.

CFP: The Memorial Museum in the Digital Age

Call for Contributors

E-book: The Memorial Museum in the Digital Age

The Memorial Museum in the Digital Age will be the first comprehensive review of thinking and practice related to the effects and affects of the digital for memorial museums. This type of commemorative and educational space has traditionally contained object-heavy displays to stand-in for people, cultures and things that have been destroyed. Whilst some critics believe that such exhibitions help provide a tangible ‘bridge between past and present’ (Joanne Hansen-Glucklich 2014) with objects, others have argued that they create ‘the illusion of simultaneity’ (Andrew Hoskins 2003), i.e. as if we can experience the past in the now. As Paul Williams (2007) contests, objects in the memorial museum can only ever point to the absent. This edited collection seeks to interrogate the impact the introduction of digital practices has had on these traditionally object-heavy spaces. It aims to bring together the voices of academics, archivists, activists and curators to explore questions such as:

  • How does the digital alter our relationship with things that remind us about loss and their association with the past through remediation?
  • To what extent can the digital expand the space of the memorial museum towards the ‘museum without walls’? What are the political and ethical consequences of this particularly in places where destruction of people, cultures and artefacts is ongoing?
  • To what extent are digital tools being used to interrogate spaces of contested memory?
  • How are memorial museums engaging with digital technologies? What are the challenges and opportunities of emerging platforms?
  • To what extent do concepts such as ‘the virtual’, ‘(im)materiality’, ‘loss’ and ‘interactivity’ inform uses of the digital in memorial museums and related archives?
  • To what extent can the digital offer opportunities for alternative, non-professional voices to produce, record and distribute memory of atrocities?
  • How might digital technologies challenge, change and expand our notion of what is meant by the ‘memorial museum’?
  • Where is the digital not being used and why?
  • How might the digital be used to resist practices of forgetting perpetuated by official State, national and transnational memorialisation?
  • How are visitors and the general public using digital technologies to continue or obstruct memorialisation?

Whilst there is a growing number of publications interested in museums and the digital, the specificity of the memorial museum – usually dedicated to the remembrance of people, cultures and places now destroyed – raises particular concerns relating to preservation, materiality, ethics and absence that require careful consideration in the digital age.

Academics including PhD students, museum researchers, curators, activists and archivists are encouraged to propose an abstract. Ideally, the edited collection aims to include chapters that cover a range of examples from across the world and in relation to a diverse range of genocides, conflicts, histories of slavery and colonialism, and disasters, and hopes to include theoretical pieces as well as discussions about the practices of using digital technologies in memorial museums.

Please send abstracts of 200-350 words with a short bio (no more than 150 words) to v.walden@sussex.ac.uk by March 20th2019. Finished articles would be 6,000-8,000 words in length and ETA delivery time on these will be late August 2019. If you have any queries, do not hesitate to get in contact before the deadline. In the spirit of open access and speaking across disciplines, the manuscript will be published as a free e-book. The proposal has already attracted the interest of an appropriate UK university-based publisher.

Given the e-book format, it may be possible to include video, image or interactive content to which you have the right to publish. Less traditional formats of publication are encouraged and can be discussed with the publisher at the stage of abstract submission. Please note the language of the publication will be English.

CFP: Journal of the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives

Dear colleagues —

I am happy to announce a call for papers for the Journal of the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives, Issue no. 50.

Important Dates

April 15, 2019: Full article submission deadline

June 15, 2019: Journal release

Editor: Bertram Lyons (editor@iasa-web.org)

General Call for Papers

IASA Journal invites proposals covering general topics of interest to the sound and audiovisual archives communities throughout the world. Articles, reviews, essays, and technical documents are welcome.

Issue no. 50 Special Considerations:

In IASA’s 50th year, we coincidentally will release the 50th issue of the IASA Journal! We encourage submissions that respond to critical issues for audiovisual archives today:

* Degradation in legacy physical collections, especially magnetic carriers

* Obsolescence of playback equipment and strategies for acquiring spare parts for playback machines

* Selecting sustainable and compatible target codecs and wrappers for A-to-D video reformatting projects

* Strategies for handling the proliferation of born-digital audiovisual formats and codecs

* Planning for the necessary technical infrastructure needed to ingest and manage the large digital collections being created and acquired at sound and audiovisual archives worldwide

* Intellectual property rights

* Metadata strategies for time-based media objects

* Providing meaningful and useful access to sound and audiovisual collections for researchers of all kinds and in all locations

Please consider submitting an article covering one of these topics or the results of independent research that would be of interest to the IASA membership and the international audiovisual archives community in general.

About the IASA Journal

The Journal of the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives represents the collected research and applied work of the global audiovisual archives community. Also known as the IASA Journal, it is published in issues bi-annually and available as an open-access Journal online (https://journal.iasa-web.org). The IASA Journal uses a double-blind peer-review methodology (the authors do not know who reviews their papers, and reviewers do not know who wrote the papers they are reviewing).

The IASA Journal is constantly looking for material to publish. Please submit articles, research output, or reviews you consider of interest to IASA via the online submission page (http://journal.iasa-web.org/pubs/about/submissions).

Information for Authors

Authors need to register (http://journal.iasa-web.org/pubs/user/register) with the journal prior to submitting or, if already registered, can simply login (http://journal.iasa-web.org/pubs/login) and begin the five-step process.

1. You will be informed of IASA’s intention to review the article no more than one week after your submission.

2. Soft copy as a .doc or .rtf or .txt file should be submitted with minimal formatting.

3. Illustrations (photographs, diagrams, tables, maps, etc) may be submitted as low resolution files placed in the file or sent separately. Once the article has been accepted for publication, high resolution copies will be required and should be sent as separate documents.

4. Use footnotes not endnotes.

5. Use in-text referencing, and all references should be listed at the end of the article in alphabetic order and chronologically for each author. Both should adhere to Harvard style guidelines for references (quick review here: http://www.citethisforme.com/harvard-referencing).

6. Authors are encouraged to submit original research or to develop their conference presentations into more detailed accounts and/or arguments for publication in the journal.

7. Abstracts (maximum 250 words each) must be included with each submission and may be in French, German, Spanish, or English.

Copyright Notice: Unless stated otherwise, authors license their work under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Signed articles and reviews represent the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the policies of the Association.

Please contact editor@iasa-web.org with any questions.

Thanks, and best —

Bertram Lyons, Editor, IASA Journal

Call for Authors: Monograph on special collections storage, access, travel and insurance issues

Primary Research Group, www.Primaryresearch.com, is seeking a librarian/author to write a monograph of approximately 10,000 words on space, storage, access, insurance and exhibit travel issues in special collections management. The report should include a minimum of 5 detailed interviews with academic libraries, museums or archives totaling approximately 5,000 words.. The report will also include a  literature review with detailed author commentary and bibliography. This is a compensated assignment.   Send your resume with cover letter to jmoses@primaryresearch.com.

James Moses, Research Director
Primary Research Group Inc.
2585 Broadway, #156
NY  NY   10025

Open CFP: VIEW Journal

VIEW Journal invites scholars and audiovisual archivists to submit proposals for topics that may be incorporated in ongoing journal issues. We encourage you to use this “General Call for Speakers” to provide suggestions for articles and audiovisual essays, as well as other forms of reflective thought.

Submit a Proposal

The VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture is the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of European television history and culture. It offers an international platform for outstanding academic research and archival reflection on television as an important part of our European cultural heritage. With its interdisciplinary profile, the journal is open to many disciplinary perspectives on European television – including television history, media studies, media sociology, cultural studies and television studies.

The journal acts both as a platform for critical reflection on the cultural, social and political role of television in Europe’s past and presence and as a multi-media platform for the presentation and re-use of digitized audiovisual material.

In bridging the gap between academic and archival concerns for television and in analyzing the political and cultural importance of television in a transnational and European perspective, the journal aims at establishing an innovative platform for the critical interpretation and creative use of digitized audio-visual sources. In doing so, it will challenge a long tradition of television research that was – and to a huge amount still is – based on the analysis of written sources.

The journal aims at stimulating new narrative forms of online storytelling, making use of the rich digitized audiovisual collections of television archives around Europe. All articles in the journal must make use of audio-visual sources that will have to be embedded in the narrative: not as “illustrations” of an historical or theoretical argumentation, but as problematized evidence of a research question.

Audience

The Journal of European Television History and Culture addresses the scientific community as well as a larger audience interested in television as a cultural phenomenon. Broadcast historians, media studies scholars, audiovisual archivists, television professionals as well as the large group of enthusiastic fans of “old” television will have the opportunity to dive into the history and presence of European television by means of multi-media texts.

We are looking forward to receiving your creative proposals! Go to: http://viewjournal.eu/online-submissions/

CFP: Debates in Digital Humanities Pedagogy

This call does not specifically mention archives, but there is one suggested topic discussing student work, such as digitization and OCR correction, that is related. Also, that same suggestion asks about labor and what should and should not be compensated. This is an opportunity for those who work in academic libraries and are involved with digital humanities to give voice to the role of archives.

_________________________

Brian Croxall and Diane Jakacki, Editors

Deadline for 500-Word Abstracts: April 1, 2019

Part of the Debates in the Digital Humanities Series
A book series from the University of Minnesota Press
Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein, Series Editors

Over the last decade, Digital Humanities (DH) has reinvigorated discussions of pedagogy in the academy. Unconferences on DH pedagogy and blogs about teaching with digital methods in the humanities classroom have led to extensive discussions about approaches to teaching at annual disciplinary conferences. At the same time, conversations and debates about teaching digital humanities—whether to undergraduates, graduate students, or to the faculty themselves—have led to more and more people becoming involved in the field, each of them coming from different subjects bringing their own perspectives and praxes with them to the teaching of DH. We have arrived at a moment when institutions are formally integrating DH into the curriculum and granting degrees; we are creating minors, majors, and even graduate certificates in DH; all of this while many of us are still new to the experience of (teaching) DH. This calls for another round of discussion of DH pedagogy or a discussion of pedagogy in a new key.

These students—and the ways in which we teach them—are a very real expression of what each of us as instructors believes digital humanities to be. As our students and our colleagues continue to ask us “What is digital humanities?” we have the opportunity to answer their questions in terms of how we teach digital humanities.

We seek authors who can develop critical arguments around such topics and questions as the following:

  • What should a DH curriculum look like? Where should those courses have their departmental homes? And how do those home departments affect both the praxis of the instructor and the course outcomes? How much DH does a course need in order for it to “count” as DH?
  • What is the impetus for the recent growth and interest in creating DH majors, minors, and graduate certificates? How does the evolution of a formalized curriculum mirror or compare to the creation of programs like Women’s, Gender, or Media Studies?
  • How has DH pedagogy changed in the last 10 years? How has it ossified over that same decade? In what ways does the specter of the literature classroom continue to “haunt” or “possess” DH pedagogy?
  • To what degree has the “lab” model of DH pedagogy drawn from traditions of STEM pedagogy? To what degree is it a descendant (in the Darwinian sense) from the Humanities seminar with its tradition of Socratic dialogue?
  • Who teaches—or gets to teach—DH? To what degree do universities continue to depend on post-docs, alt-acs, or other people in precarious labor positions to do the work of DH instruction, including designing that curriculum?
  • How does the frequent alignment of DH with the library on university campuses affect those who are learning DH and those who are doing the teaching?
  • What forms of invisible labor exist in the DH pedagogy, including the ubiquitous guest speaker via Skype, the sharing of syllabi and assignments, or the asking of help from those who have built tools? To what degree should/must pedagogies be similarly open? What would a “proprietary” DH pedagogy look like and could it truly be “DH”?
  • How does the ongoing investment of external grant-funding agencies impact the ways in which DH pedagogy evolves at an institution? Who on campus is being supported to ‘learn’ DH in order to teach it?
  • What should we make of the trend in DH training towards informal learning experiences—workshops, training institutes, THATCamps—over more formalized coursework, especially at the graduate level? To what degree are these informal training opportunities deployed by various institutions as opportunities for income generation from a population of students who may feel compelled to learn about a growth area within the academy?
  • How do questions of access and accessibility affect the student (and instructor) experience? Does DH pedagogy require kinds of digital privilege?
  • What are the ethics of asking students to do project work—digitization, OCR correction, etc.—within the bounds of a classroom? What labor can be considered educational and what labor should be compensated?
  • What are the outcomes of DH education? Do we have longitudinal data of the students who have gone through formal curricular programs? Are we teaching our humanities students new ways to close-read and critique, or are we providing them with marketable skills?
  • What do students think about their DH training? What perspectives do they have to share with those who are doing the teaching and/or making the broader curricular decisions?

While we expect that the essays in this volume will draw on the practical experiences of its contributors, it is decidedly not a series of assignment or course case studies. Looking to the title of the series, we place an emphasis on the “Debates” and look forward to abstracts that make arguments about the pedagogies of DH.

Tentative Deadlines

  • Abstracts due: April 1, 2019
  • Decisions on accepted proposals: May 1, 2019
  • Proposal to press: June 1, 2019
  • Essay Submission Deadline: October 1, 2019
  • Peer-to-Peer Review: October 2019
  • Revisions Due: January 1, 2020

Please contact the editors with any questions:
Brian Croxall, Brigham Young University (brian.croxall@byu.edu)
Diane Jakacki, Bucknell University (dkj004@bucknell.edu)

Call for Chapters: Impacts of the Cloud on Records Management and Archives

Editors
Salvador Pichardo Barragan, San Jose State University/Queensland University of Technology

Call for Chapters
Proposals Submission Deadline: April 1, 2019
Full Chapters Due: July 29, 2019
Submission Date: November 18, 2019

Introduction
“The Library of Babel” is a short story conceiving of a universe in the form of a nearly infinite library containing all possible books. This story by Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges (1899–1986) could easily be adapted to our current point in time. It would seem with the development of Cloud and the possibility of theoretically storing all information in very view repositories or just one, that society could conceivably create an “archive of Babel.” A place that contains all know information created by any person or device. While some would hail this as a monumental achievement there are others who could point out its deficiencies. Herbert Simon (1918-2001), understood the dilemma of too much information long before the development of Cloud and IoT as he commented “what information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients. Hence a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention and a need to allocate that attention efficiently among the overabundance of information sources that might consume it.” Therefore, the capability now exists for data to be gathered that can tell us everything about everyone and anything at all times. What does this mean for archives and records management?

Does this future require that we have archivists or records managers when the cloud provider could subsume both roles? Besides the ontological and phenomenological questions there are issues around privacy, memory and history. Will privacy be a thing of the past and will there be a need for memory when everything we do will be documented, hence will there be a need to even write history. The archive for the last several hundred years was the gate keeper and custodian of memory and knowledge, what Jacque Derrida calls ‘archontic’ and ‘anarchic’ power: the power to collect, organize, interpret and destroy held sway across numerous archives regardless of its location or composition. However, the Cloud will possibly alter where this ‘archontic’ and ‘anarchic’ actions will take place.

This compilation will address the ontological nature of the archive and the role of records management as society moves towards the Cloud and the capture of all information from IoT. Within this ontological journey the discussion will also address the question of archival memory and ‘archontic’ and ‘anarchic’ power and how this might change. And if we no longer have to decide what to keep, since the cloud can store everything, what then will an archivist or records manager decide? Will the cloud providers usurp their respective roles? The answer to this final question will address what role the archivist and records manager can still have in this ever changing human landscape.

Objective
The objective of this publication is to address a question that is upon us as a profession and society. What will the archivist and records manager become and do in the age of technology that enables the automatic creation, organization, classification, disposition and centralization of data and information. This question opens up many avenues of discussion for the present and future. Two key areas: ontology and epistemology. What it means for the archive and the archivist and records manager from an existential point of view and how does the knowledge required by the archivist and records manager change what the profession will become. The secondary benefits concern memory and how it will be changed and its impact on history and society. This volume will influence the archives and records profession for the next 10 years by addressing the existential bearing on both areas.

Target Audience
The target audience of this book will be composed of professionals and researchers working in the field of information and archives, records management, library studies, information technology, knowledge management, history, sociology, and philosophy of science. Moreover, the book will provide insights and support an understanding of how cloud computing and IoT may affect our decisions for future in different types of work communities and environments.

Recommended Topics
• Cloud, Society and Culture
• Cloud and decision making
• Records Management in the Cloud
• Retention/Disposition in the Cloud
• Legal issues of records in the Cloud
• Cyber risks of the Cloud and what it means for records
• Cloud Service Providers: threat or opportunity
• Archives and Being
• Cloud and the Power of the Archive: ‘archontic’ and ‘anarchic’
• Memory and the Cloud
• Cloud, IoT and the Archivist
• Archiving everything: Jenkinson?
• Information appraisal and the Cloud
• Information Selection
• Archiving the Cloud: the future

Submission Procedure
Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit on or before April 1, 2019, a chapter proposal of 1,000 to 2,000 words clearly explaining the mission and concerns of his or her proposed chapter. Authors will be notified by April 15, 2014 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by July 29, 2019, and all interested authors must consult the guidelines for manuscript submissions at http://www.igi-global.com/publish/contributor-resources/before-you-write/ prior to submission. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project.

Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted to this book publication, Impacts of the Cloud on Records Management and Archives. All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer review editorial process.
All proposals should be submitted through the eEditorial Discovery®TM online submission manager.

Publisher
This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business Science Reference,” and “Engineering Science Reference” imprints. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit http://www.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2020.

Important Dates
April 1, 2019: Proposal Submission Deadline
April 15, 2019: Notification of Acceptance
July 29, 2019: Full Chapter Submission
Sept 1, 2019: Review Results Returned
Nov 1, 2019: Final Acceptance Notification
Nov 18, 2019: Final Chapter Submission

Inquiries
barragansalvadorp@gmail.com

Propose a Chapter