CFP: Information Studies, Race and Racism (second call)

Guest Editors:
Melissa Villa-Nicholas
Latesha Velez

Description

As Safiya Noble asserts in her seminal work Algorithms of Oppression “The cultural practices of our society…are part of the ways in which race-neutral narratives have increased investments in Whiteness” (p. 59). There is a need to disrupt these race-neutral narratives in Information Studies research and there is a growing body of work that does just that by re-orienting Information Studies research to centralize discussions of race and racism. Many researchers also use critical theories to help analyze their findings or are offering counter-narratives highlighting minoritized actors (such as women and people of color). Re-centering Information Studies by contextualizing it within an analysis of how race and racism affects our field changes what we think we know, and our understandings about Information Studies. Only when these alternate narratives are integrated into the fabric of Information Studies research can Information Studies begin interrogating the long held beliefs in our field.

We are intentionally casting a wide net and invite authors from a broad range of professional and academic backgrounds to contribute to this special issue of Open Information Science journal. We are asking for submissions that centralize the theme of Information Studies, race and racism, in order to evolve the field into a more critical theoretical foundation that moves away from colorblind ideology and narratives of neutrality, which only serve to disguise the ubiquity of whiteness.

The scope of this issue might include, but is not limited to, research on:

  • Anti-racism methods in Information Studies
  • Critical Race Theory and Information Studies
  • Deconstructing ‘colorblindness’ in Information Studies and/or information institutions
  • Intersectional analysis of Information Studies (race and : gender, sexuality, class, disability and ableism, indigeneity,
  • Classifications, cataloging, and taxonomies
  • Analysis of whiteness and information organizations, information institutions, or applications of whiteness studies to Information Studies
  • How notions of race and racism affect our we conceptualize and teach information literacy
  • Contemporary or historical debates around race and/or racism in information institutions (Libraries, Archives, Museums, special collections, business, education, labor, Silicon Valley, Government, incarceration)
  • Big Data, race and racism
  • Race and racism as it relates to knowledge organization
  • Anti racism or applications of an analysis of racism of Information Studies in non-Western and/or non U.S. contexts
  • Information, surveillance, and racism

How to Submit

Authors are kindly invited to register at our paper processing system at: http://www.editorialmanager.com/opis/ and submit their contribution.

Every manuscript should be clearly marked as intended for this special issue. All papers will go through the Open Information Science’s high standards, quick, fair and comprehensive peer-review procedure. Instructions for authors are available here. In case of any questions, please contact Guest Editors or Managing Editor (katarzyna.grzegorek@degruyter.com).

As an author of Open Information Science you will benefit from:

  • transparent, comprehensive and fast peer review managed by our esteemed Guest Editor;
  • efficient route to fast-track publication and full advantage of De Gruyter e-technology;
  • no publication fees;
  • free language assistance for authors from non-English speaking regions.

The deadline is June, the 30th, 2019.

Contact Info:
In case of any questions, please contact Guest Editors or Managing Editor (katarzyna.grzegorek@degruyter.com).

Contact Email: Lukasz.Gworek@degruyter.com

URL: https://www.degruyter.com/page/1930

CFP: Journal of Archival Organization – special issue on “Archives and Artifacts”

Archivists manage artifacts in a variety of situations – plaques and memorabilia found in personal papers; models, material samples, and mockups in architectural and industrial design collections; academic and business archives with significant artifactual holdings; or even hybrid archives-museum collections. This special issue will feature articles and case studies relating to the arrangement and description of artifacts in archives. We hope to encourage wider sharing of information between archivists who manage artifacts, and to spur dialogue that will hopefully lead to professional best practices.

We invite papers on any aspect of the archival organization of artifacts. Contributions might cover the following themes:

  • Impacts on processing planning and workflows
  • Integrating processing of artifacts with processing of manuscript material
  • Costs associated with arranging, describing, and storing artifacts
  • Minimum, added-value, and optimal description for artifacts
  • Artifact description and arrangement practices to maximize use/discovery by curators, researchers, and other users
  • Archival management systems and tools used to manage data about artifacts in an archival setting
  • Commonalities between the archives and museum profession in arrangement and description

We are particularly interested in exploring approaches to managing data about artifacts. Questions include: If extant archival systems do not meet our management needs for artifacts, how can we address these system limitations? What tools have archivists adopted or developed to manage data about artifacts? What can archivists learn from museum professionals about managing data about artifacts?  Can item-level processing of artifacts be usefully (and practically) integrated into the container- or folder-level processing usually applied to manuscript material, and if so, how?

Submissions

Papers may be original research articles or case studies. Submissions will be peer reviewed by independent, anonymous expert referees. Please refer to the Journal of Archival Organization Instructions for Authors: www.tandfonline.com/action/…

The deadline for submissions is June 21, 2019.

Prospective authors are invited to contact the Guest Editors, Michele Combs and John Nemmers, in order to discuss submissions for this special issue which is scheduled for publication in December 2019:

Michele Combs
Lead Archivist, Special Collections Research Center
Syracuse University
mrrothen@syr.edu, 315-443-2081

John Nemmers
Associate Chair, Special & Area Studies Collections
University of Florida
jnemmers@ufl.edu, 352-273-2766

The Journal of Archival Organization is an international, peer-reviewed journal publishing high-quality, original research relating to all aspects of the arrangement, description, and provision of access to all forms of archival materials. For more information about the Journal of Archival Organization and examples of recent articles published in the journal: www.tandfonline.com/toc/wjao20

CFP: Journal of Map and Geography Libraries Call for Papers: Special Issue on Information Literacy Instruction

This call mentions primary source instruction.

_______________________________________

The Journal of Map & Geography Libraries invites articles highlighting practice and research-based approaches on the ways changes in information literacy philosophies have redefined/reimagined information literacy instruction in academic libraries. For this special issue we would like to include articles focusing on library instruction across all types of libraries that highlight creative approaches to student learning.

The purpose of this special issue is to expose map and geospatial information librarians to a wide range of instructional approaches in order to inspire new, creative ideas and collaborations for spatial literacy instruction.

We expect an interesting range of contributions, from traditional research studies to design cases and opinion pieces supported by literature and/or practice. Examples and experiences from outside the traditional boundaries of instructional design and educational technology will also enrich the discussion.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

Geospatial data literacy instruction
Application of the ACRL Information Literacy Framework to spatial literacy instruction
Primary source instruction
Curriculum mapping for information literacy
Embedded librarianship
The flipped classroom model in library instruction
Active learning in library instruction
Assessment
Practices and challenges in distance learning instruction

Article abstracts are due May 19, 2019 with full articles due August 30, 2019. After abstract submission, authors will be notified of acceptance by May 31, 2019.

Send article abstracts jmgleditors2@gmail.com with the subject: Instruction Special Issue

CFP: Special Issue, Meta: Translators’ Journal

Meta: Translators’ Journal calls for papers dedicated to the archives of literary translators. Literary authorship has long been studied from a genetic perspective, yet only recently have literary translators’ working documents—their research notes, drafts, revisions, proofs, their manuscripts, contracts and correspondence—become a focus of translation process research. The emergence of genetic translation studies (Cordingley and Montini 2015) has coincided with a heightened interest in translators’ creativity and agency stimulated by post-structuralist and sociological approaches, and the advent of ‘translator studies’. Despite a growing number of case studies engaging with translators’ avant-textes, translation studies is yet to have its ‘archival turn’. Unlike other disciplines in the humanities, such as philosophy, literature, history, or sociology, in translation studies there has been little reflection upon the concept or function of the archive. Historically, most translators’ papers survived incidentally, because the translator was also a literary author. However, the general revaluing of translation and the rise of translation studies has begun to attract institutional investment in the form of the purchasing or collecting of translators’ papers, manuscripts and materials, and the creation of translation archives.

Articles are encouraged to introduce transdisciplinary perspectives that resonate with theories or notions of the archive in other disciplines. The translation archive can be conceptualised within book history or sociological approaches to the archive as an artefact or space inscribed with the material history of a translator’s work—such as a hard drive, box of manuscript pages, a private study, an office, an online forum, a curated collection, an uncatalogued library holding—sites that witness the labour of translation and its relationship to its environment, collaborators and other semiotic systems. It may be conceptualised within the parameters of genetic criticism as a dossier génétique, a series of texts that attest a translation’s genesis over time to reveal the evolution of translation strategies. It can be approached from the perspectives of library and information sciences and archive studies to elucidate the value, place and function of translation archives within the development and organisation of libraries and collections, as well as the acquisition, documentation, cataloguing and  communication practices that affect translators’ archives and their use by the public,
researchers or translators themselves—in short, how records of translation and users interact to make meaning.

Researchers of other disciplines are invited, furthermore, to consider how recognising the presence and dynamics of translation may shift their own relationship to the archive. Can translation studies offer other fields with tools to interrogate their historical or theoretical understanding of the archive? Can it challenge existing attitudes to translation within archival spaces? What can a translational turn offer studies of the archive in fields beyond translation studies? Articles for this special issue may therefore address one or more of the following questions:

  • What is a ‘translation archive’ and how are translation archives formed? Why do the materials of certain literary translators survive while others are lost or forgotten? What are the epistemological and ontological particularities of different kinds of translation archives?
  • What methodologies are available to researchers of translation archives and what can translation researchers learn from cognate disciplines that study and theorise archives? How do archival approaches enrich translation analysis, and what are their limits or limitations? What criteria should be used when evaluating the claims of archival research? What can knowledge of translation dynamics and translation studies offer archival studies?
  • What is the importance of informal archives produced by online networks, community groups, fans, volunteers? What are the challenges for researchers approaching archives found outside of libraries and institutional settings? What challenges does the proliferation of personal computers, translation technologies,
    translation memories and other digital media pose for archival approaches to translation studies

Abstracts of no more than 600 words to be submitted by 1st of May 2019

Submission of completed articles in English, French or Spanish by 1st of December 2019

Please send an abstract with short biographical note to  translationarchives.meta@gmail.com

Call for Nominations: Lyman H. Butterfield Award 2019

Since 1985, the Lyman H. Butterfield Award has been presented annually to an individual, editorial project, or institution for notable contributions in the areas of documentary publication, teaching, and service. The award is granted in memoriam of Lyman Henry Butterfield, whose editing career included contributions to The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, the editing of the Adams Family Papers, and publishing The Letters of Benjamin Rush.

For a list of previous recipients see  https://www.documentaryediting.org/wordpress/?page_id=14

Nominations should be made by email. Supporting letters from members of the Association are encouraged. All materials should reach the committee chair by 15 May 2019, sent by e-mail to:

Sue Perdue
ssh8a@virginia.edu

Butterfield Award Committee

Sue Perdue, Chair
Tenisha Armstrong
Mark Cheatham
Elaine Pascu
Michael Stevens

CFP: special issue on Information Management and Digital Information

The journal Open Information Science is seeking papers for a special issue on Information Management and Digital Information to be published in December 2019.

  • Deadline for extended abstracts: 31 May 2019
  • Notification of acceptance to authors: 15 June 2019
  • Deadline for full articles: 30 September 2019
  • Publication: December 2019-Spring 2020

Topics might include, but are not restricted to:

  • Historical accounts of the development of information management
  • Systematic reviews of contextualised information management (by industry sector, jurisdiction)
  • Theoretical models of information management (including comparative analyses)
  • Information management issues in “niche” sectors
  • Information management professions and professionals (for example education and training, career paths, de-professionalism)
  • Implications of open science for information management
  • Participatory culture and information management (including marginal practitioners in online communities, crowdsourcing information and data, open public data)
  • Regulatory and ethical issues in information management

Abstracts and Submissions

Please send an extended abstract (maximum 1,500 words) by 31 May 2019 to the guest editor Adrienne Muir, Professor of Information Management, Robert Gordon University (a.muir3@rgu.ac.uk). Submitted abstracts should be in English.  The guest editor will evaluated abstracts and will inform authors of acceptance or rejection by 30 June 2019.

All submitted articles will be subject to peer review. Therefore, the acceptance of an extended abstract does not imply the publication of the final text unless the article has passed the peer review and revisions (if required) have been made to the text.

CFP: “Digital Wellness”: Open Information Science Issue on Digital Humanities

Guest Editor
Valerie Karno, Director, Graduate School of Library and Information Studies, University of Rhode Island

Description
Since its inception, the digital humanities has considered the question “what is it to be human in relation to machines in the digital age?” This issue of Open Information Science asks for papers that consider how we can understand “digital wellness” as part of the ongoing inquiry into what acts, representations, and understandings exist around human-ness in the digital era. Particularly, this volume seeks to explore the possibilities of digital wellness provided through a range of disciplines and forms. We invite papers which consider architectures, platforms, and diverse disciplinary engagements with the opportunities and challenges surrounding digital wellness:

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • How are search engines addressing needs for wellness?
  • How do literary arts engage wellness literacies through multimodal creations?
  • How does the digital self interface with wellness?
  • How do digital borders interface with geographic borders towards impacting human wellness?
  • How does data creation and visualization impact user wellness?
  • How do digital formats and texts embrace animals, earth terrain, and environmental conditions towards understandings of wellness?
  • How is wellness conceived as integrated with or external to digital systems?
  • How do corporate digital organizational systems influence our notion of the digital person as imbricated in capital (in Multinational or Local companies)
  • How do digital wealth and investing systems inform our notions of the human and the circuit?
  • How do digital visual formats rearrange or constrain our conceptions of the human?
  • How do youth coding programs (like Hour of Code and Family Code Night) affect educational and familial relationships to the human as code?
  • How are tensions around big data balanced against an increasing number of “micro-forms”?

How to Submit

Submissions are welcome which attend to the following topics’ connections to wellness:

  • Biotechnology’s visualization of wellness
  • Computational approaches to wellness
  • Processing, designing, modeling, implementing wellness
  • Digital Rights Movements, Open Access, Curation, Data
  • Affect
  • Embodied Digital Culture
  • Archives
  • Gaming and Simulation
  • Scale
  • Networks
  • Project-based Learning
  • Relationships between Humanism, Post-Humanism, Earth Matter and Sea/Liquid Life
  • Distributed Work and Workplace Wellness
  • Links between the Virtual and the Local
  • Information Ethics and Wellness
  • Digital Sound and Wellness
  • Digital Wellness and Social Justice
  • Digital Wellness across Racial, Ethnic, Gendered, and Classed Borders
  • Meditation, Mindfulness, and Relaxation in the Digital Era

Please send 1-2 page Abstracts by June 1, 2019 to vkarno@uri.edu.

Papers will be due by October 1, 2019.

Contact Email:

Lukasz.Gworek@degruyter.com

URL: https://www.degruyter.com/page/1940