Call for Book Chapter Proposals: Learning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries

Call for Book Chapter Proposals

Working titleLearning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries

Proposal submission deadline: January 27th, 2020

Editors: Arianne Hartsell-Gundy (Duke University), Kim Duckett (Duke University), Sarah Morris (University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill)

Publisher: Association of College & Research Libraries

Chapter proposals are invited for Learning in Action: Designing Successful Graduate Student Work Experiences in Academic Libraries, a book examining how academic librarians can best support interns, graduate assistants, and practicum and field experience students (both LIS and other fields). We welcome proposals focused on philosophical perspectives, practical strategies, reflective essays, and/or case studies. In addition to contributions from staff working in academic libraries, we welcome contributions from LIS faculty and current and recent graduate students.

Proposals are sought for chapters related to the following themes. Proposals should be between 250-300 words, and final chapters will be between 3000-4000 words.

Preparing Graduate Students for Professional Roles

This section will explore how internships, assistantships, practicums, and field experiences can support the learning of graduate students in order to help readers consider how these programs benefit graduate students and how they might want to structure such learning experience in their institutions. We hope to see explorations of skill-based training and discussions of how to most effectively mentor graduate students through hands-on work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • The role of internships, field experiences, and practicums in LIS or other forms of graduate education
  • Developing professional workplace skills (e.g: “soft skills,” time management, project management, workplace communication, reflective practice, self-awareness)
  • Preparing graduate students for the job search – job hunting, applying for professional positions, resume development, interview preparation

Logistics & Structures for Designing Graduate Student Work Experiences

This section will look at how to administer these types of positions and programs in order for readers to gain a bigger picture of what it takes to oversee this work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Strategies for structuring learning experiences for students (either programs or individualized experiences)
  • Interviewing, selecting and/or hiring
  • Developing a diverse and inclusive workforce and environment
  • Onboarding and approaches to training
  • Program assessment

Ethical Considerations

This section will examine the complex ethical issues surrounding these types of graduate experiences in order to help the reader consider how they will address these questions in their work.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Issues surrounding paid versus unpaid labor
  • Ensuring students receive credit for their work (e.g. course credit, acknowledgement)
  • Issues related to balancing the organization’s needs and students’ learning and professional development needs

Managers’ Perspectives

This section will address the experience of the managers of these work experiences in order to give both new and seasoned managers insight into what these experiences will mean for them.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Tips for mentoring and coaching
  • The first-time manager perspective
  • Emotional labor, boundaries, and self-care
  • How to make it meaningful for you, your work, and your own professional goals

Students’ Perspectives

This section highlights LIS students’ perspectives on positive and negative aspects of their work experiences, and practical advice for making the most out of their internships, assistantships, etc.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Finding and designing meaningful graduate student work experience(s)
  • Strategies for self-advocacy
  • Perspectives on career-preparedness
  • Navigating workplace dynamics as a temporary employee
  • Balancing work responsibilities with coursework and life experiences

Submission Procedure

Proposals should be submitted as a single email attachment to learninginactionlibraries@gmail.com

Proposals should include:

  • Author name(s), institutional affiliation(s), job title(s)
  • Brief description of your experience as a graduate student or working with graduate students in academic libraries
  • Brief statement of your interests in professional writing
  • Clear description of the topic you are proposing for a potential chapter (about 250-300 words)

Important dates:

Proposals due: January 27th, 2020
Authors notified and sent chapter guidelines: March 15th, 2020
Full chapters due: June 29th, 2020
Final revised chapters due: November 16th, 2020

For additional information contact:

Arianne Hartsell-Gundy, Duke University Libraries: arianne.hartsell.gundy@duke.edu

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s