Inaugural Issue: Current Research in Digital History

Volume 1 (2018)
(open access)

Synthesis and Large-Scale Textual Corpora: A Nested Topic Model of Britain’s Debates over Landed Property in the Nineteenth Century
Jo Guldi and Benjamin Williams

Digitally Analyzing the Uneven Ground: Language Borrowing Among Indian Treaties
Joshua Catalano

Sites of Sovereignty: American Indian Earthwork and Burial Site Activism in the Midwest, 1917–1968
Mary Wise

Mining the ICC: Macroanalysis of the Indian Claims Commission
Peter Carr Jones

Geo-Locating Census Micro-Data: Segregation, Clustering, and Residential Behaviours of Migrant Communities in London, 1881–1911
James Perry

Mapping Mobility: Class and Spatial Mobility in the Wall Street Workforce, 1890–1914
Atiba Pertilla

“Attracted by the Khaki”: War Camps and Wayward Girls in Virginia, 1918–1920
Erin N. Bush

Glitching History: Using Image Deformance to Rethink Agency and Authenticity in the 1960s American Folk Music Revival
Michael J. Kramer

Revealing Political Bias: A Macroanalysis of 8,480 Herblock Cartoons
Simon Appleford

(Re)Humanizing Data: Digitally Navigating the Bellevue Almshouse
Anelise Hanson Shrout

Mapping the Media Landscape in Old Regime France: Citation Practices and Social Reading in the Affiches, 1770–1788
Elizabeth Andrews Bond

“The Two Diseases Are So Utterly Dissimilar”: Using Digital Humanities Tools to Advance Scholarship in the Global History of Medicine
E. Thomas Ewing

Growing Strong: The Institutional Expansion of Knowledge in the Early Republic
George D. Oberle III

Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches to the Development of Darwin’s Origin of Species
Jaimie Murdock , Colin Allen and Simon DeDeo

Notes on the Future of Virginia: Visualizing a 40-Year Conversation on Race and Slavery in the Correspondence of Jefferson and Short
Scot French

Researching Genres in Agricultural Communities: The Role of the Farm Record Book
Marcy L. Galbreath and Amy L. Giroux

Talk-Back Boards and Text Mining: New Digital Approaches in Museum Visitor Studies
Josh Howard

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