Call for Chapter Proposals: Borders & belonging: Critical examinations of LIS approaches toward immigrants

This call does not specify archives and is geared towards libraries, but there may be potential crossover.

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Call for Chapter Proposals:
Borders & belonging: Critical examinations of LIS approaches toward immigrants

Book Editor: Ana Ndumu
Publisher: Library Juice Press
Series: Critical Race Studies and Multiculturalism in LIS
Series Editors: Annie Pho and Rose L. Chou

Borders & belonging: Critical examinations of LIS approaches toward immigrants is a response to the need for discourse on how the LIS field, particularly in North America, is shaped by longstanding ideologies on nativity, race, ethnicity, language, class, and “belonging.” The goal is to probe concrete aspects of the LIS field (e.g., workforce, programs, facilities, resources, education and publications) and shed light on ethnocentric and essentialist frameworks. Here, an immigrant is defined as a person who permanently lives in but was born outside of the U.S. or Canada and respective territories. An immigrant is either a refugee, asylee, legal permanent resident, naturalized citizen or undocumented person. Please consult the editor about ideas involving international students.

Works should critically examine the role of immigration policy along with sociocultural paradigms in the library-immigrant relationship. Prospective authors are encouraged to refer to Mignolo & Walsh’s1 On Decoloniality: Concepts, Analytics, Praxis along with Caidi, Allard, and Quirke’s2 Information practices of immigrants to develop their contributions.

Below is a sample, not exhaustive, list of topics:
• libraries and the promotion of assimilation or westernization
• linkages between libraries and colonialism and/or imperialism
• the role of libraries and information in mass migration and globalization
• immigrant self-determination versus structural inequality
• immigrant pre-migration information behavior
• immigrant contributions to information innovations (e.g., Silicon Valley, H-1B visa)
• presumptions of immigrant information incompetence and/or digital divides
• libraries and model minority narratives
• libraries and liberation rhetoric in the immigrant context
• libraries in sanctuary cities/states
• libraries in immigration detention centers
• libraries, privacy and the USA PATRIOT Act
• library services to specific immigrant groups (i.e., DACA recipients, TPS holders, religious minorities, forcefully displaced groups)
• nativism, populism, or xenophobia in libraries
• historical aspects of library services to immigrants
• gaps in immigrant information behavior research
• immigrants in the LIS workforce

Invited authors will complete 3,000 to 6,000 word chapters. LIS affiliates (LIS professionals, paraprofessionals, students and faculty) in the U.S. and Canada are encouraged to propose chapters. Chapters may be conceptual or empirical, exploratory or explanatory. All research methods are welcome. Case studies and literature reviews must draw from both migration/population studies and LIS literature. No previously submitted or published material.

Submissions:
Please email a 300-500 word proposal to Ana Ndumu at andumu@umd.edu by December 15, 2018. Proposals should include:
• Anticipated title
• Chapter rationale
• Brief outline
• Author(s) bio(s)

About Library Juice Press:
Library Juice Press, an imprint of Litwin Books, LLC, specializes in theoretical and practical issues in librarianship from a critical perspective, for an audience of professional librarians and students of library science. Topics include library philosophy, information policy, library activism, and in general anything that can be placed under the rubric of “critical studies in librarianship.”

About the Series:
The Critical Race Studies and Multiculturalism in LIS series collects and publishes works from theoretical, practical and personal perspectives that critically engage issues of race, ethnicity, cultural diversity and equity in library and information science (LIS). Works published in this series include:
Pushing the Margins: Women of Color and Intersectionality in LIS, edited by Rose L. Chou and Annie Pho
Topographies of Whiteness: Mapping Whiteness in Library and Information Science, edited by Gina Schlesselman-Tarango
Teaching for Justice: Implementing Social Justice in the LIS Classroom, edited by Nicole A. Cooke and Miriam E. Sweeney

About the Editor:
Ana Ndumu is a researcher at the University of Maryland (UMD), College Park’s College of Information. She earned a Ph.D. in Information at Florida State University´s School of Information and explores the intersection of libraries, information and demography. She has completed studies on Black immigrants’ ICT device and Internet access; Black immigrants’ information behavior and experiences with information overload; the development of a scale for measuring and examining information overload as immigrant acculturative stress; and critical discourse analysis on LIS literature involving immigrants. Ana is a UMD President’s Postdoctoral Fellow and Digital Library Federation (DLF) Futures Fellow.

1. Mignolo, Walter, and Catherine E Walsh. On Decoloniality: Concepts, Analytics, and Praxis. Durham: Duke University Press, 2018.
2. Caidi, Nadia, Danielle Allard, and Lisa Quirke. “Information practices of immigrants.” Annual review of information science and technology 44, no. 1 (2010): 491-531.

Editorial Opportunities

dh+lib is looking for four new editors to join our editorial team:

Technical Editor
The Technical Editor will be responsible for maintaining the dh+lib website (which currently runs on WordPress and is hosted by ACRL) and working with ACRL to manage any problems that might arise. The person in this position would also take the lead assessing the current platform to ensure that it best meets our needs. Candidates should be able to commit 3-5 hours/week; have experience working with WordPress and WordPress plugins, ideally with PressForward; and have a strong interest in digital publishing.

Outreach Editor
The Outreach Editor will be responsible for maintaining relationships with professional organizations related to the mission of dh+lib, including the ACRL Digital Scholarship Section and the Association of Digital Humanities Organizations, and initiating new relationships that can help dh+lib reach out to new communities and help us grow. This editor would also have the opportunity to manage the dh+lib  Twitter account. Candidates should be able to commit 3-5 hours/week; be a member of an organization related to the mission of dh+lib (such as ACRL or ADHO); and have a strong interest in digital publishing.

As both of the above editorial positions are new, the people in these positions would help define their roles. Additionally, all members of the editorial team help with article submissions and would be involved with other content decisions.

Review Editor (2 positions)
Review editors take an active role in shaping the content that appears in the dh+lib Review, as well as contributing to strategic discussions about our workflows and future directions for the publication. Responsibilities of this role include working on rotation to either manage the week’s production effort (selecting items from nominated content, authoring/publishing posts) or provide editorial support suggestions on another editor’s week. Due to our editorial calendar, most of this activity takes place on Wednesday evenings/Thursday mornings, and Review editors often collaborate informally and have infrequent editorial meetings throughout each semester.

Each editorial appointment will be for a term of two years with options for renewal.

Candidates should submit a letter expressing their interest and their qualifications to dhandlib.acrl@gmail.com by November 7 for consideration.

CFP: Performance Measurement and Metrics (PMM)

Performance Measurement and Metrics (PMM) is a leading double-blind refereed, international journal, charting new qualitative and quantitative developments and techniques for measurement and metrics in information environments.

Journal URL: https://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/pmm

The journal is concerned with planning and development in libraries and the organizations of which they are part.  We invite authors to submit their original research papers related (but not limited) to the following topics:

  • Measurement, assessment and evaluation in libraries and other information environments
  • Uses of StatsQual, IT metrics, and informetrics to measure and then inform the management of libraries
  • Library and Information service value
  • The library’s role in the measurement of learning and in organisational accreditation
  • The impact and value of using social media in information services.
  • Infonomics
  • The value and impact of information/content/learning objects in education
  • The measurement and assessment of learning
  • Performance measurement and management in higher education, museums and archives
  • The use of ‘business’ and web analytics

Issue submissions should be made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer-review system.  Registration and access is available athttp://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/pmm.

Submissions may be sent anytime, year-round.

This journal is abstracted and indexed by:

  • BFI (Denmark)
  • Current Abstracts;
  • Education Full Text;
  • INSPEC;
  • Library, Information Science and Technology Abstracts;
  • Library Literature and Information Science Full Text;
  • OmniFile Full Text Mega;
  • OmniFile Full Text Select;
  • Scopus;
  • zetoc

2017 Archives & Manuscripts Emerging Writers Award announced

Congratulations to the 2017 recipient of the Archives & Manuscripts Sigrid McCausland
Emerging Writers Award
 – Ross Spencer. The award recognises the work of emerging writers who have published an article in the journal. Each year the members of Archives & Manuscripts Editorial Board decide the winner of this award, which features a $1000 cash payment.

  • 2017 – Volume 45, Number 2, July 2017 – Ross Spencer, ‘Binary Trees? Automatically identifying the links between born-digital records’.

2017 Publications Mander Jones Awards Recipients announced

2017 Publications Mander Jones Awards Recipients

Congratulations to the 2017 Publications Mander Jones Award recipients who were presented with an Award or Commendation certificate and Judges’ Comments at the 2018 National Conference Welcome Reception, held in Perth today.

Recipients

Category 1B:    Frank Upward, Barbara Reed, Gillian Oliver, and Joanne Evans, Recordkeeping Informatics for a Networked Age

Category 2A:    The Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Tjungunutja: From Having Come Together

Category 2B:    Joanna Sassoon, Agents of Empire: How E L Mitchell’s photographs shaped Australia

Category 4:    Melbourne Diocesan Historical Commission, Melbourne Diocesan Historical Commission (MDHC) Summary of & Index to The Advocate 1868-1990 (48 volumes)

Category 5:    Greg Rolan, ‘Towards interoperable recordkeeping systems: A meta-model for recordkeeping metadata’, in Records Management Journal, 27(2)

Category 6:    Lachlan Glanville, ‘Reading Germaine Greer’s Mail’, in The Conversation, Australian edition, 24 March 2017

Category 8:    ArchivesACT, ArchivesACT’s Find of the Month, Archives.act.gov.au. (2018). Previous find of the month – ArchivesACT. [online]

Commendations

Category 1B:    James Lowry (ed.), Displaced Archives

Category 2A:     World War 1 Writers Group, Ku-ring-gai Historical Society Inc., Rallying the Troops: A World War 1 Commemoration (Volume III)

Category 5:    Luke Scholes, ‘Unmasking the myth: the emergence of Papunya painting’, published in Tjungunutja: From Having Come Together.

Category 6:    Fiona Ross, ‘Humane and intimate, how the Red Cross helped families trace the fates of WW2 soldiers’, published in The Conversation, Australian edition, 11 May 2017

CFP: The International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI)–Special Issue on Engaging Disability: Social Science Perspectives on Information and Inclusion

Call for Papers: The International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI)–Special Issue
“Engaging Disability: Social Science Perspectives on Information and Inclusion”

The International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI) invites submissions for a special issue focused on social scientific perspectives on information and disability inclusion and empowerment. We welcome full research papers that make a novel contribution to this area of research; this may be empirical, theory-based, methodological, and/or practical in nature, and we encourage international perspectives and collaborations. We will also have a special section for student work, works in progress, opinion pieces, and professional reports.

Extended abstracts of up to 1,000 words for full research papers and up to 500 words for contributions to the special section are due by 31 October 2018. Authors will be notified of acceptance in mid-November, and final papers will be due by 1 March 2019.
We seek submissions from different disciplines and perspectives for this special issue of IJIDI. The goal of this special issue is to bring together researchers who focus specifically on Engaging Disability. Topics and themes related to disability and information access may include, but will not be limited to:

  • Physical, intellectual, and socio-cultural barriers and supports related to disability, information access, and inclusion
  • Analysis of international information policy considerations of disability
  • Hidden/invisible/latent disability
  • Engaging and including disability in libraries, museums, archives, and other information organizations
  • Disability and employment in LIS
  • Disability and higher education in LIS
  • Faculty and librarians with disabilities: Is technology inclusive or exclusive?
  • Accessibility and usability (broadly conceived)
  • Children and youth with disabilities in the context of information concepts
  • Intersectionality and disability: Exploring multiple identities
  • The disability culture: Information and technology issues

Kim M. Thompson of the University of South Carolina will be guest editor for this issue, which is scheduled for publication in October 2019. Please contact KimThompson@sc.edu should you have any questions about this call. IJIDI Author Guidelines are available at: http://publish.lib.umd.edu/IJIDI/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Schedule: Call for Papers: October 2018
Extended Abstracts due: 31 October 2018 (with notification of acceptance by mid-November 2018)
Accepted Papers due: 1 March 2019
Peer Review: March 2019
Revised Papers due: 1 July 2019
Publication: October 2019 (issue 4)

Call for Applicants: Bibliographical Society of America Fellowship Program

Each year, the Bibliographical Society of America funds a number of fellowships designed to promote bibliographical inquiry and research.  Supported projects may range chronologically from clay tablets and papyrus rolls to contemporary literary texts and born-digital materials. Topics relating to books and manuscripts in any field and of any period are eligible for consideration as long as they include analysis of the physical object – that is, the handwritten, printed, or other textual artifact – as historical evidence.

Applications are due on December 1, 2018.

For a complete list of fellowships and for application procedures, please visit:

https://bibsocamer.org/awards/fellowships/