Research Grant: Special Collections Research Center of William & Mary Libraries

The Special Collections Research Center of William & Mary Libraries is pleased to announce that it will award up to four travel grants of up to $1,500 each to faculty, graduate students, and/or independent researchers to support use of its collections. Writers, creative and performing artists, filmmakers and journalists are welcome to apply.

For information on the manuscripts, rare books, and university archives held in the Special Collections Research Center, please visit https://libraries.wm.edu/research/special-collections. Strengths of the collections include, but are not limited to, books on dogs, fore-edge painting books, Virginia family papers and libraries, twentieth-century Southern politics, women’s diaries, travel diaries, veterans’ letters, notable alumni, and College history. Prospective applicants are encouraged to discuss their research project and the collections that might support it with Special Collections staff before submitting an application.

Eligibility

A successful candidate for the 2018-2019 Travel Scholarship will:

  • Reside beyond a 100-mile radius of Williamsburg, Virginia.
  • Not be a current William & Mary employee or student.
  • Submit a research plan that draws heavily on our manuscripts, rare books, and/or University Archives collections.
  • Submit a brief budget with anticipated expenses.
  • Commit to schedule their research visit within the 2018–2019 cycle (May 1, 2018 and April 30, 2019.
  • Agree to submit a brief research report (1-2 pages) on their findings and experiences.
  • Consider placing any published work resulting from their research into the William & Mary Institutional Repository (https://publish.wm.edu/).
  • Participate in the intellectual life of the university by either making a public presentation of research findings and experiences, meeting with faculty and students with similar research interests, or both.

Criteria

Applications will be evaluated based on:

  • The merit of the research plan.
  • The demonstrated need for in-person access to the holdings of the Special Collections Research Center.

How to Apply

Please submit the following:

  1. A brief research plan (500 words maximum) that describes the proposed project, lists the specific materials to be consulted, and explains how these materials will benefit your research. Please name the document: LastName_FirstName_research_plan.pdf.
  2. A brief budget of anticipated expenses. Please name the document: LastName_FirstName_budget.pdf.
  3. Current curriculum vitae. Please name the document: LastName_FirstName_cv.pdf.

Send all application materials by the end of the day on April 15 to spcoll@wm.edu with the email subject line: 2018-2019 Research Travel Grants. Please contact us at spcoll@wm.edu or 757-221-3090 with any questions.

Important Dates

  • March 7, 2018: Application period opens.
  • April 15, 2018: All application materials are due.
  • April 30, 2018: Successful applicants are notified by email.
  • May 1, 2018: Grant cycle begins.
  • April 30, 2019: Deadline for submitting research report.

What expenses does the grant cover?

Grant money may be used for the following:

  • Transportation expenses (including air, train or bus tickets; car rental; mileage using a personal vehicle; parking fees);
  • Accommodations (daily standard range of $108 for Williamsburg/James City and York Counties, Virginia);
  • Meals & Incidental Expenses (daily standard per diem rate of $64 for Williamsburg/James City and York Counties, Virginia).

Expenses are reimbursed as they are incurred, but must adhere to the William & Mary Travel Guidelines (https://www.wm.edu/offices/financialoperations/travel/index.php). The submission of a William & Mary substitute W-9 Cardinal form is required. Original receipts must be submitted for reimbursement.

Visual Materials Bibliography

The SAA Visual Materials Section recently updated their Bibliography. This is a great resource and will be helpful for anyone interested in the topic. Great job to all who contributed!

Here’s the outline:
1. Photography–History and General Works
1.A Reference works (encyclopedias, dictionaries)
1.B Discursive Texts
1.C Aesthetics, Criticism, and Interpretation
1.D Photographers (Biographies, Directories)
2. Visual Processes, Formats, and Technical Manuals
2.A Photography
2.B Moving Image Materials
2.B.1 Motion Picture Film
2.B.2 Videotape
2.B.3 Digital Moving Image Formats
2.C. Selected Print Technologies (Lithography, Chromolithography)
2.D. Visual Ephemera
2.E. Architectural Records
3. Visual Materials Published Repository Guides and Catalogs
3.A. National Guides/Union Catalogs
3.B Regional Resources
3.C United States- State by State
4. Archives/Collections Management of Visual Materials
4.A General works
4.B. Preservation
4.C. Conservation
4.D. Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Recovery
4.E. Cataloging standards and tools
4.E.1 Organization / Metadata (e.g. EADMARC, Dublin Core, ADAG)
4.E.2 Description & Content (e.g. AAT, LCSH, TGM, APPM DACS)
4.F. Processing, Arrangement and Description of Visual Materials
5. Reformatting of Visual Materials
5.A Digitization
5.B Microfilming
5.C Optical Disk
6. Essential Visual Materials Serials
6.A Photography
6.B Motion Picture Film

Newsletter Calls and Issues

A while ago, I started posting calls for content and new issues for newsletters. I’ve found that there’s much activity and it’s hard to keep up with the calls in a timely manner without them dominating this blog. Instead, I’m going to occasionally post reminders that publishing opportunities are always available for newsletters.

See my compiled list of newsletters.

I encourage writing for newsletters because there’s usually a quicker turnaround and they are always looking for content. But mostly, because it’s a great way to start writing. It can be overwhelming to think about starting with a scholarly article, so writing short pieces is good practice while getting another line on your resume. Plus, they generally don’t require research and instead focus more on current project and activities. So go share with your colleagues!

Recent Issue: Journal of the South African Society of Archivists

Vol. 50, 2017
(open access)

“Preservation of Endangered Archives: a Case of Timbuktu Manuscripts”
Alexio Motsi

“The Role of the South African Human Rights Commission to Records Management in the Public Sector in South Africa”
Mpho Ngoepe, Makutla Mojapelo

“Community Awareness for Archives in Tanzania: a Case Study of Zanzibar National Archives”
Maximilian Chami

“Making a Case for the Development of a University Records and Archives Management Programme at the National University of Science and Technology in Zimbabwe”
Njabulo B Khumalo, Dickson Chigariro

“Preservation of Audio-Visual Records at the National Archives of Namibia”
Hertha Lukileni-Iipinge, Nathan Mnjama

“The 150th – Year Watershed – a Secure Digital Repository Created for Standard Bank Heritage Centre”
Letitia T Myburgh

Recent Issue: Information & Culture

New Issue: Volume 53, Number 1 (January/February 2018)

“Crises” in Scholarly Communications? Insights from the Emergence of the Journal of Library History, 1947–1966

Maria Gonzalez and Patricia Galloway
p. 3-42

This study examines the first ten years of the journal now known as Information & Culture. Founded in 1966 as The Journal of Library History, the Journal has been shaped according to the values, habits, and competencies that its contributors brought to changing circumstances so as to transform the Journal into an erudite interdisciplinary publication distant from its beginnings as a compendium of entertaining vignettes and didactic notes on the writing and uses of library history. Historical perspectives are used to frame various crises in scholarly communications that are treated chronologically as they confronted the Journal, drawing on archival sources, secondary sources, interviews, participant observation by Gonzalez, and close reading of the publication to construct a narrative about the Journal in its relation to higher education, scholarly publication, and professional and disciplinary developments in librarianship and companion fields under the increasing influence of technology on these fields. The characters, actions, and settings are interpreted through the sociological lens of Pierre Bourdieu’s concepts of social field, habitus, and multiple forms of actual and metaphorical capital request government.

Maria Elena Gonzalez, after a career in architecture and building, earned a PhD in Library and Information Science (2008) from the School of Information, University of Texas-Austin, and has taught in that field at Wayne State University and Rutgers University.

Patricia Galloway spent twenty years at the Mississippi Department of Archives and history before coming to teach courses on appraisal and digital archives at the School of Information, University of Texas-Austin. She holds PhDs in Comparative Literature (1973) and Anthropology (2004) from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

Reading the Minor Forest Product bulletins of the Philippine Bureau of Forestry: a case study of the role of reference works in the American Empire of the early twentieth century

Brendan Luyt
p. 43-66

Empires are built around the control of information with an often-overlooked aspect of empire building being the construction of tools of reference. These tools incorporate with them in summary form the multiplicity of inscriptions that are a product of the empire’s epistemological operations. In order to shed some light on this face of empire, this article focuses on three readings of the minor forest products bulletins published by the Bureau of Forestry of the Philippines in the early twentieth century. The first of these sees the bulletins as demonstrating the Bureau of Forestry’s mastery of the forest domain in the face of natural and human resistance to its work. In the second reading, we can see the Bureau’s efforts to create and assist “botanical entrepreneurs” capable and willing to exploit forest products in an efficient manner. Finally, we can read the bulletins as particular manifestations of the botanical guide as a genre. In this case the bulletins created a series of “inscription clusters” that served to enhance the authority of the Bureau of Forestry as a mediator between users and the forests of the Philippines.

Brendan Luyt is Associate Professor at the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication & Information, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He received both his MLIS and PhD degrees from the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. He also holds a MA in Political Science from Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Pinkerton’s National Detective Agency and the Information Work of the Nineteenth-Century Surveillance State

Alan Bilansky
p. 67-84

Private security contractor for business and government, Allan Pinkerton acted centrally in early chapters of the history of the security state. The operative and the report, Pinkerton’s principal surveillance technologies, are analyzed here in relation to each other and in their historical development as information technology, drawing on Pinkerton’s fictionalized accounts of cases, secret reports and other Agency documents. Pinkerton management was consistently preoccupied with strict compliance of operatives, their deployment in a network, and the regular submission of reports. This study suggests information can lead to uncertainty and the surveillance state was and is compartmentalized, entrepreneurial, and other-than-public.

Alan Bilansky holds a PhD in Rhetoric and Democracy from Penn State and an MSLIS from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he consults with faculty about technology and occasionally teaches informatics. He is currently at work on a book examining the information practices of Pinkerton’s National Detective Agency.

The Literature of American Library History, 2014 – 2015

Edward Goedeken
p. 85-120

This biennial review of the writings on the history of libraries, librarianship, and information surveys about 200 publications that were published in 2014 and 2015. The essay is divided into a number of specific sections including: academic and public libraries, biography, technical services, and the history of reading and publishing. It also contains a brief list of theses and dissertations that were completed in 2014 and 2015.

Edward A. Goedeken is Professor of Library Science and Collections Coordinator at the Iowa State University Library. Over the past twenty years he has maintained an ongoing bibliography of library history scholarship, and every two years crafts a review essay for Information & Culture on the most recent writings in this discipline.

This issue of Information & Culture is now available on Project Muse.

Book Reviews (reviews are open access)

The Econimization of Life, by Michelle Murphy, reviewed by Marika Cifor 

Michelle Murphy provocatively describes the twentieth-century rise of infrastructures of calculation and experiment aimed at governing population for the sake of national economy, pinpointing the spread of a potent biopolitical logic. Resituating the history of postcolonial neoliberal technique in expert circuits between the United States and Bangladesh, Murphy traces the methods and imaginaries through which family planning calculated lives not worth living, lives not worth saving, and lives not worth being born. The resulting archive of thick data transmuted into financialized “Invest in a Girl” campaigns that reframed survival as a question of human capital. The book challenges readers to reject the economy as our collective container and to refuse population as a term of reproductive justice. (Duke University Press)

A Mind at Play: How Claude Shannon Invented the Information Age, by Jimmy Soni and Rob Goodman, reviewed by Edward Goedeken

The life and times of one of the foremost intellects of the twentieth century: Claude Shannon—the neglected architect of the Information Age, whose insights stand behind every computer built, email sent, video streamed, and webpage loaded. In this elegantly written, exhaustively researched biography, Jimmy Soni and Rob Goodman reveal Claude Shannon’s full story for the first time.

Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost its Edge in Computing, by Marie Hicks, reviewed by Megan Finn

Marie Hicks explores the story of labor feminization and gendered technocracy that undercut British efforts to computerize. That failure sprang from the government’s systematic neglect of its largest trained technical workforce simply because they were women. Women were a hidden engine of growth in high technology from World War II to the 1960s. As computing experienced a gender flip, becoming male-identified in the 1960s and 1970s, labor problems grew into structural ones and gender discrimination caused the nation’s largest computer user—the civil service and sprawling public sector—to make decisions that were disastrous for the British computer industry and the nation as a whole. (MIT Press)

Atari Age: The Emergence of Video Games in America, by Michael Z. Newman, reviewed by Roderic Crooks

Beginning with the release of the Magnavox Odyssey and Pong in 1972, video games, whether played in arcades and taverns or in family rec rooms, became part of popular culture, like television. In fact, video games were sometimes seen as an improvement on television because they spurred participation rather than passivity. These “space-age pinball machines” gave coin-operated games a high-tech and more respectable profile. In Atari Age, Michael Newman charts the emergence of video games in America from ball-and-paddle games to hits like Space Invaders and Pac-Man, describing their relationship to other amusements and technologies and showing how they came to be identified with the middle class, youth, and masculinity. (MIT Press)

CFP: Diversity and Inclusion in Music Librarianship special issue of Music Reference Services Quarterly

Though focused on music librarianship, the call includes mentions aspects also applicable to archives and special collections.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

We are excited to invite submissions from practitioners, scholars, activists, and students on the theme of Diversity and Inclusion in Music Librarianship for a special issue of Music Reference Services Quarterly (MRSQ).

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

* Diversity initiatives in music librarianship
* Inclusive management practices
* Social justice in music libraries
* Collection development techniques to support diverse constituents
* Inclusive practices in resource cataloging or description
* Accessibility and digital musical content delivery
* Accessibility and music library facilities
* Diversity and/or inclusion in music librarianship education

And finally, given ALA Midwinter conversations:

* Neutrality in (music) libraries

MRSQ is a peer-reviewed journal published by Taylor & Francis.

Deadline for initial submissions is August 1, 2018. Articles tentatively accepted by editors will subsequently go through double-blind peer-review. Please email both editors if you would like to discuss article ideas or questions: rescott3@memphis.edu and ANA@mailbox.sc.edu

Sincerely,

Ana Dubnjakovic and Rachel Scott
Co-editor-in-chief | Music Reference Services Quarterly

CFP: Special Collections as Sites of Contestation

CFP: Special Collections as Sites of Contestation
Editor: Mary Kandiuk
Publisher: Library Juice Press

Special collections are actively acquired by libraries or received by donation. Increasingly, special collections are emerging as sites of contestation. Funding and political choices often underpin acquisition, access and promotion of these collections resulting in unequal representation, biased interpretations and suppressed narratives. This collection of essays will interrogate library practices relating to special collections. The essays will explore the reinterpretation and resituating of special collections held by libraries, examine the development and stewardship of special collections within a social justice framework, and describe the use of critical practice by libraries and librarians to shape and negotiate the acquisition, cataloguing, promotion and display of special collections.

Proposals are invited for chapters relating to special collections held by all types of libraries in all countries. Special collections are library and archival materials encompassing a wide range of formats and subject matters. They are usually distinguished by their historical, societal, cultural or monetary value, uniqueness or rarity, and are housed separately from a library’s main circulating collection with a commitment to preservation and access. Specific topics of interest include but are not limited to:

– Evolving understandings and interpretations of historical materials in special collections.
– Censorship, self-censorship, academic freedom, intellectual freedom and special collections.
– The use of critical practice to resist cultural hegemony in the development of special collections.
– The challenges of developing contemporary special collections relating to social justice.
– Examining special collections through the lens of the marginalized and disempowered.
– The representation of unpopular or radical views in special collections.
– Contested interpretations of special collections.
– Safe spaces and special collections.
– Controversial exhibits relating to special collections.
– Information literacy and special collections employing a social justice framework.
– Decolonizing and indigenizing special collections.
– Donors, funding, power and politics and their influence on the development of special collections.
– Development and stewardship of special collections relating but not limited to race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, politics, religion, war, conflict, genocide, sex, pornography, racism, discrimination, heritage, memory, and identity within a social justice framework.
– Any aspect of acquisition, curation, structure, cataloguing, digitization, presentation, arrangement, promotion, display and instruction relating to special collections using a social justice or critical practice framework.

Proposals

Chapter proposals should contain 1) an abstract of 500-750 words describing the proposed contribution and 2) a brief biographical statement about the author(s). Proposals are due June 1, 2018. Please direct all submissions and inquiries to Mary Kandiuk (mkandiuk@yorku.ca).

Timetable:

June 1, 2018: Deadline for 500-750 abstract proposing a chapter.
July 1, 2018: Notification of acceptance of proposed chapter.
December 1, 2018: Deadline for submitting full chapter manuscript.

About the Editor

Mary Kandiuk is the Visual Arts, Design & Theatre Librarian and a Senior Librarian at York University in Toronto, Canada. She holds a Master of Arts in English and a Master of Library Science from the University of Toronto. She is the author of two bibliographies of secondary criticism relating to Canadian literature published by Scarecrow Press and co-author of Digital Image Collections and Services (ARL Spec Kit, 2013). She is co-editor of the collection In Solidarity: Academic Librarian Labour Activism and Union Participation in Canada published by Library Juice Press in 2014. Her most recent publications include articles on the topic of academic freedom. For more information see:http://mkandiuk.blog.yorku.ca/.