Call for Applicants: ARL Digital Scholarship Institute at Indiana University

As an additional note, the curriculum includes:

  • Digital Recovery: Archives & Exhibitions with Omeka
  • Multimodal Online Publishing with Scalar
  • Geospatial and Temporal Mapping
  • Information Visualization
  • Text Analysis: Concordances, Word Trends, & Word Clouds with Voyant Tools
  • Scholarly Editions: Text Encoding and Publishing with TEI
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The ARL Academy is accepting applications for the third iteration of the ARL Digital Scholarship Institute, with a deadline of Friday, May 18, 2018. The Digital Scholarship Institute is a five-day, cohort-based opportunity for professionals in ARL member librarieswho are new to digital scholarship and would like to develop their skills in an intensive, yet supportive, learner-centered environment. This iteration of the ARL Digital Scholarship Institute will take place MondayFriday, July 30–August 3, 2018, on the Indiana University campus in Bloomington and will be hosted by Indiana University Libraries.
Any ARL library professional at any stage of their career, who is looking to develop their digital scholarship skills and increase their agility in the modern research ecosystem, regardless of rank, degree, or years in the field, is eligible to apply. For more information, see the Audience Statement.
The cost of the institute is $1,500, excluding travel and accommodations.
For additional information and instructions on how to apply, visit the ARL Digital Scholarship Institute webpage. The application deadline is May 18, 2018.

Call for Platform and Poster Presentations: 2018 SAA Research Forum

SAA invites submission of abstracts (of 250 words or fewer) for either 10-minute platform presentations or poster presentations. Topics may address research on, or innovations in, any aspect of archives practice or records management in government, corporate, academic, scientific, or other setting. Presentations on research results that may have emerged since the 2018 Joint Annual Meeting Call for Proposals deadline are welcome, as are reports on research completed within the past three years that you think is relevant and valuable for discussion. Please indicate whether you intend a platform or poster presentation.

Abstracts will be evaluated by a review committee co-chaired by Nance McGovern (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and Heather Soyka (Kent State University).

Deadline for submission of abstracts: May 15, 2018. You will be notified of the review committee’s decision by July 2 (in advance of the Early-Bird registration deadline).

Submit your 250-word abstract no later than May 15 via email to researchforum@archivists.org.

Please be sure to include:  Presentation title, your name, affiliation, email address, and whether your proposal is for a platform or poster presentation.

Requests for Survey Participation

I haven’t done this for a while, but see below for students conducting research for school projects. Because these are emerging scholars, please help support them!

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My name is Brianna LoSardo and I am a graduate student in the Museum Professions program at Seton Hall University. My master’s thesis is about records management and information security in museums. I would greatly appreciate it if you could take a short survey relating to records management practices in your institution. It should take about 5 minutes. Also feel free to pass this on to any other colleagues who may be interested. All survey responses will be kept anonymous and will only be used for the purpose of my research.

To access the survey, please use this link:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeSEQtlbBxt0AbCnR_vCFfh7fDM9GFBjL6QGk2X6iwCuWmLeQ/viewform?usp=sf_link

Thank you in advance for your help and participation. If there are any questions or technical difficulties with the survey, please contact me at Brianna.losardo@gmail.com.

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Hello archivists working in outreach, digital humanities, online tools, and/or user engagement!

I am a student in the MSLS program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill conducting research about online crowdsourcing projects and the ways that cultural heritage institutions assess their success.

If you’ve helped manage a project that uses volunteers to describe, transcribe, annotate, or curate materials online, I’d love to hear from you via an online survey. The survey will take approximately 5-10 minutes. Participation is voluntary and the survey is anonymous and no individual subject or personal identifying information will be shared.

The survey is available here: unc.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_cTOtKJPtquFKpEN Please (please!) feel free to share this survey link with others who have experience with these types of projects.

Thank you!
Emma Parker

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My name is Finley Trent and I am a graduate student in University of North Carolina Greensboro’s Master of Library and Information Studies program. I am conducting a research study about instruction in Special Collections & Archives, under the guidance of my faculty adviser, Dr. Anthony Chow. I am emailing to invite you to participate in this brief and anonymous electronic survey if you currently work in Special Collections & Archives or have in the past. The survey will take approximately 10 minutes or less. If you have any questions concerning this survey or study, please email me at fstrent@uncg.edu.
Click the link below to participate:
Thank you for your time,
Finley Trent

Call for 2018-19 Research Fellows, Sequoyah National Research Center

Research Fellowships 2018-2019

The Sequoyah National Research Center (SNRC) at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock invites proposals for its 2018-2019 Research Fellowship Program, which fosters research involving forms of Native expression in a wide range of disciplines.

The program encourages scholars to conduct research in the Center’s collections to support significant studies in a wide range of fields and subjects such as Indian removal from the Southeast, Native journalism and journalists, late 20th century and early 21st century tribal societies and economics, literary artists, entertainment, and others.  Fellowships are intended to defray travel expenses and living expenses while recipients are conducting research in the SNRC.

Recipients of research fellowships are expected to spend at least a work week conducting research at the Center.  The Center requests that, following their research, research fellows send the Center a copy of the results of their research in published form whenever it appears or in unpublished form if the research is not conducted for publication.  The Center also requests notice of the presentation of the research in a public forum.  Recipients will be expected to conduct their research between July 1, 2018 and June 30, 2019.

Two research fellowships of $1,500 each will be offered in the 2018-2019 academic year.  The most significant criteria considered in awarding a fellowship are the research project’s potential contribution to Native American studies and the extent to which the SNRC’s collections support scholarship in a research subject.  Consideration will also be given to the applicant’s background and academic accomplishments if the applicant works in an academic setting.  Academic affiliation, however, is not a requisite for receiving a fellowship.

An applicant should send a cover letter and a statement of the objectives of his or her project, the significance of the project, and relation of the proposed project to the applicant’s background, previous work, and future plans.  Research fellowship applicants should attach a curriculum vita.  Applications should be sent to SNRC Director Daniel F. Littlefield, Jr. atdflittlefiel@ualr.edu.

Applications will be considered between March 15, 2018 and May 1, 2018.  Awards will be made by May 15, 2018.

Research Grant: Special Collections Research Center of William & Mary Libraries

The Special Collections Research Center of William & Mary Libraries is pleased to announce that it will award up to four travel grants of up to $1,500 each to faculty, graduate students, and/or independent researchers to support use of its collections. Writers, creative and performing artists, filmmakers and journalists are welcome to apply.

For information on the manuscripts, rare books, and university archives held in the Special Collections Research Center, please visit https://libraries.wm.edu/research/special-collections. Strengths of the collections include, but are not limited to, books on dogs, fore-edge painting books, Virginia family papers and libraries, twentieth-century Southern politics, women’s diaries, travel diaries, veterans’ letters, notable alumni, and College history. Prospective applicants are encouraged to discuss their research project and the collections that might support it with Special Collections staff before submitting an application.

Eligibility

A successful candidate for the 2018-2019 Travel Scholarship will:

  • Reside beyond a 100-mile radius of Williamsburg, Virginia.
  • Not be a current William & Mary employee or student.
  • Submit a research plan that draws heavily on our manuscripts, rare books, and/or University Archives collections.
  • Submit a brief budget with anticipated expenses.
  • Commit to schedule their research visit within the 2018–2019 cycle (May 1, 2018 and April 30, 2019.
  • Agree to submit a brief research report (1-2 pages) on their findings and experiences.
  • Consider placing any published work resulting from their research into the William & Mary Institutional Repository (https://publish.wm.edu/).
  • Participate in the intellectual life of the university by either making a public presentation of research findings and experiences, meeting with faculty and students with similar research interests, or both.

Criteria

Applications will be evaluated based on:

  • The merit of the research plan.
  • The demonstrated need for in-person access to the holdings of the Special Collections Research Center.

How to Apply

Please submit the following:

  1. A brief research plan (500 words maximum) that describes the proposed project, lists the specific materials to be consulted, and explains how these materials will benefit your research. Please name the document: LastName_FirstName_research_plan.pdf.
  2. A brief budget of anticipated expenses. Please name the document: LastName_FirstName_budget.pdf.
  3. Current curriculum vitae. Please name the document: LastName_FirstName_cv.pdf.

Send all application materials by the end of the day on April 15 to spcoll@wm.edu with the email subject line: 2018-2019 Research Travel Grants. Please contact us at spcoll@wm.edu or 757-221-3090 with any questions.

Important Dates

  • March 7, 2018: Application period opens.
  • April 15, 2018: All application materials are due.
  • April 30, 2018: Successful applicants are notified by email.
  • May 1, 2018: Grant cycle begins.
  • April 30, 2019: Deadline for submitting research report.

What expenses does the grant cover?

Grant money may be used for the following:

  • Transportation expenses (including air, train or bus tickets; car rental; mileage using a personal vehicle; parking fees);
  • Accommodations (daily standard range of $108 for Williamsburg/James City and York Counties, Virginia);
  • Meals & Incidental Expenses (daily standard per diem rate of $64 for Williamsburg/James City and York Counties, Virginia).

Expenses are reimbursed as they are incurred, but must adhere to the William & Mary Travel Guidelines (https://www.wm.edu/offices/financialoperations/travel/index.php). The submission of a William & Mary substitute W-9 Cardinal form is required. Original receipts must be submitted for reimbursement.

Travel Scholarship: Bernard Becker Medical Library

The Bernard Becker Medical Library is now accepting applications for the Archives and Rare Books Spring/Summer 2018 travel scholarship.  Researchers living more than 100 miles from St. Louis are eligible to apply for this award of up to $1,000 to help defray the costs of travel, lodging, food, and other expenses associated with using our collections.  Information about Becker Library’s archival and rare book holdings can be found at becker.wustl.edu/arb.

For more information and to apply for the travel scholarship, please see becker.wustl.edu/about/news/…

Thank you.
Stephen A. Logsdon, MA, MLIS
Head of Archives
Bernard Becker Medical Library

Call for Book Chapter Proposals: Becoming a Practitioner-Researcher: A Practical Guide for Information Professionals

Thank you to Caryn Radick for passing this on!

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Dear colleagues,
We are soliciting chapter proposals for our forthcoming ACRL book, Becoming a Practitioner-Researcher: A Practical Guide for Information Professionals [working title]This book will gather practical advice from practitioners conducting research as part of their tenure or professional responsibilities at academic, public, and special libraries, and/or archives. We are seeking chapters from novice or seasoned practitioner-researchers who want to share their experiences in executing research and/or evaluation projects.

Focus of the Book:
This edited volume will address the challenges of undertaking research and offers support and advice for all stages of a project, from writing the proposal to collecting the data, to disseminating the findings whether it be an internal report or published journal article, and the myriad pitfalls that may occur in between.

Rather than focusing solely on methods, this book tackles issues such as balancing research project and work responsibilities, scaling your project to fit your budget and time constraints, collaborating with a partner or team, and other issues that impact projects. Our vision for this book is to curate an edited volume of insights that we wish we would have known when we embarked on our own research projects. Chapters will introduce and discuss a specific project in a specific institution, in order to frame the discussion of the aspects of the research process the chapter addresses. The narrative should be reflective and discuss what can be generalized about the experience that would be helpful for other practitioners in a “lessons learned” approach.

Part 1: The Research Process (starting your research, crafting a proposal, figuring out logistics)
Part 1 is about creating a holistic approach to undertaking research in a library or archive setting. We are seeking chapters that include sections addressing topics such as, but not limited to:

  • Developing an idea into a research proposal
  • Obtaining administrative buy-in and support
  • Budgeting (time, money, personnel)
  • Choosing a research design and data collection method
  • Navigating the IRB process
  • Deciding on the scale of a project and what is feasible
  • Analyzing your data
  • Sharing research (reports, formal outlets including journals)

We chose the term holistic because we feel the chapters should integrate several of the above bullet points when reflecting on research project experiences in the context of their library.

Part 2: Social Research Methods for Information Professionals (survey, content analysis observation studies, focus group, interviews, etc.) 
Part 2 is about the application of common research methods found in the library literature. Chapters should revolve around creating a research design and reflect on the realities of research practice, conveying to readers methods that worked well for particular contexts and projects. Each chapter in Part 2 will include sections on how the particular method was applied, the institutional context, and the bumps and bruises of going from research design to data collection. Please address these sections in your proposal if you are seeking inclusion in Part 2.
Potential topics include:

  • Surveys
  • Focus groups
  • Ethnographic methods (observation, visual, storytelling)
  • Interviews
  • Document/content/textual analysis

Part 3: Managing a Research Project (individual researchers and team-based collaboration)
Part 3 will bring into focus the experiences of individual researchers and teams. The purpose of this section is to provide readers a range of basic and complex project examples and how these projects have been managed by individual practitioners or collaborative teams.
Example topics for inclusion in a chapter:

  • Project management as a solo researcher
  • How teams determine responsibilities for a project
  • Cleaning and analysis of data as a team
  • Collaborating on cross-institutional projects
  • Publishing or writing as a team
  • Short reflective essays by individuals who have been both solo researchers and on a research team

Don’t see your topic here? Contact the editors at libresearcherbook@gmail.com to discuss how your idea may fit within this book’s scope.

Proposal Guidelines:
To submit a proposal,  fill out the short Survey Monkey form and attach your proposal as a Word document (.doc or .docx). The form will require author names, job titles, and institutional affiliations. The Word document for the proposal itself should be written in Times New Roman, 12 pt., be double-spaced, and include:

  • A working title for your chapter
  • A 500-word description and chapter outline including topic keywords.
  • Authors must indicate which part of the book your chapter will address: Part 1: The Research Process, Part 2: Social Research Methods for Information Professionals, or Part 3: Managing a Research Project.
  • Authors will include one or two summary sentences that make explicit the chapter’s major themes, ideas, and learning outcomes.
  • Do not use any identifying information in your proposal (e.g., do not include author names or institution names in the Word doc).
  • Citations should follow the Endnotes-Bibliography format in the Chicago Manual of Style (17th edition).

Proposals are due by Friday, April 13, 2018 at 11:59PM PST and must be submitted via online form: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/libresearcherbook

  • Contributors will be notified of their status (acceptance or rejection) within 6–8 weeks of the due date of proposals.
  • The first draft of chapters will be due in August 2018.
  • Estimated length of chapter: 2,500–4,000 words.
  • Projected publication date: Summer 2019.

Should you need to contact the editors, use the following email address: libresearcherbook@gmail.com. Bookmark the Google site: https://sites.google.com/view/libraryresearcherbook/home.

Thank you,
Lee Ann Fullington (Health Sciences Librarian, Brooklyn College/CUNY)
Brandon K. West (Head of Research Instruction Services, SUNY Geneseo)
Frans Albarillo (Social Sciences Librarian, Brooklyn College/CUNY)