New Case Study: Engaging History of Science Students with Primary Sources

Despite a significant portion of non-English science and technology texts, Leigh Rupinski, archivist in Special Collections and University Archives at Grand Valley State University Libraries, devises an interactive lesson plan to engage history of science students visiting the archives. Read all about it in “Bingo! Engaging History of Science Students with Primary Sources,” which is the thirteenth case in the open access series Case Studies on Teaching With Primary Sources sponsored by SAA’s Reference, Access, and Outreach Section.

Request to Participate in Thesis Research: Decolonizing Strategies

Hello all,

I am currently enrolled at Queens College at the City University of New York where I am finishing my MLS. For my thesis, I am conducting survey research about the range of decolonizing strategies that non-tribal archival institutions adopt across the United States and their respective successes and limitations. I would like to contact as many archivists as possible to participate in the survey.

I am attaching a link to the survey here for anyone that would care to participate! Also if you know of any colleagues that this survey applies to and might want to participate, please feel free to share it. It should take approximately 20-30 minutes to complete and all information will be completely anonymous. Your participation will be greatly appreciated! Feel free to message me if you have any questions.

forms.office.com/Pages/…

Best,
Kuba Pieczarski
Brooklyn NY

New Issue: American Archivist

Fall/Winter 2019 Issue Online Now,
Print Edition To Be Mailed Later

The Fall/Winter 2019 issue is available open access online. Read about the historical hazards of finding aids, virtual reality experiences in the archives, reassessing audiovisual archives, and more! Note: Due to shelter-in-place orders across the country, our printer/distributor has recommended delaying the mailing of the print edition as the majority of copies are sent to members’ workplaces and institutions. Expect your Fall/Winter 2019 and Spring/Summer 2020 issues to arrive together in early summer. Until then, read all content online at AmericanArchivist.org—and let your colleagues and friends know that the most recent journal content is temporarily fully accessible through June 30!

Research Survey: Workload in Special Collections public services librarianship: challenges, feelings, and impact

Good afternoon,

We hope that everyone is safe and well. We would like to invite you to participate in our research study titled, “Workload in Special Collections public services librarianship: challenges, feelings, and impact.” This study defines public services as reference, instruction, and outreach.

In 2019, the PI and Co-PI conducted a research project entitled on “A content and comparative analysis of job advertisements for Special Collections professionals using ACRL RBMS Guidelines” in order to 1) analyze and compare skilled level public services special collections job advertisements and 2) identify responsibilities that exceeded public services to further the discussion on burnout. The key findings revealed that there was a significant amount of additional work, and the work-work conflict framework is a lens through which we should view this problem (Warren & Scoulas, in press). From the results of the study conducted by Warren and Scoulas, we can conclude that overworked professionals will eventually experience burnout. The current study is designed to follow up on the previous study by conducting a survey of Special Collections librarians who work in academic libraries in the United States.

The goal of this study is 1) to identify duties that exceed position descriptions, 2) to explore how Special Collection librarians, feel about and manage their additional duties and 3) to examine the impact of the additional duties on work/life balance and productivity.

If you are 1) a special collections librarian (rare book librarian, outreach archivist, etc.) in public services in a U.S. academic institution, and 2) a special collections librarian who has had to manage duties outside of your official job description for 3 or more years, you are eligible to participate in this study.

This survey should take you less than 10 minutes to complete. You will be asked questions about your academic background, responsibilities, challenges, and support you receive in performing your daily tasks. Your decision to participate in this study is voluntary and you have the right to terminate your participation at any time. You may skip any questions you do not wish to answer. If you have questions about this project, you may contact the Principal Investigator, Kellee E. Warren, Special Collections Librarian, UIC at kwarre4@uic.edu.

This research has been reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review Board, which is a committee that works to protect your rights and welfare.  If you have questions or concerns about your rights as a research subject you may contact (anonymously if you wish) the Institutional Review Board at 1-866-789-6215 or uicirb@uic.edu.

Click here to access the survey:

Thank you for participating in our survey. If you would like to enter our lottery for a $25 gift card, please include your contact information at the conclusion of the survey.

Principal Investigator:

Kellee Warren, MLIS

Assistant Professor and Special Collections Librarian

University of Illinois at Chicago, University Library

kwarre4@uic.edu

 

Co-Investigator:Jung Mi Scoulas, PhD

Clinical Assistant Professor and Assessment Coordinator

University of Illinois at Chicago, University Library

 

Research Protocol: # 2020-0365

CFP: Digital Libraries and COVID-19

Special issue call for papers from Digital Library Perspectives

Digital libraries are services that have been developed and enhanced for years, but the recent Covid-19 pandemic has made many users aware of the service for the first time. Especially because of the closure of libraries, during the pandemic, additional efforts have been made to promote Digital Libraries and their services, as clearly visible and active libraries. Moreover, traditional libraries or those without many digital services are having the challenge of keeping their services active for their users virtually during this emergency, and librarians have been engaging in new work practices in order to achieve such objectives from their home offices.

This special issue aims to understand the challenges that the COVID-19 pandemic has posed to digital libraries and users and how they are responding to these challenges:

  • How does the pandemic affect digital libraries and their users?
  • How does the pandemic make digital libraries look different now and in the future?
  • What do you think is the lasting impact of COVID-19 on digital libraries and their users?
  • What are the new digital services and activities that librarians are conducting from their home offices to keep their libraries alive and support their users?
  • What are the responsibilities of professionals now and in the future?

We are interested in receiving papers highlighting the current initiatives and best practices that digital libraries are engaging with, in order to deepen the conversation on how they are responding to this historic challenge.

This special issue aims to be a platform for individuals and institutions to share reflections and experiences, to help us support each other as we collectively adapt and grow stronger from this experience.

Submissions should comply with the journal author guidelines and should be made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer review system.

Important Dates:

Initial submissions due date: May 1st, 2020
Preliminary Feedback notification:  May 15th, 2020
Revised submissions due:  June 1st, 2020
Peer review / editorial decisions due:  June 20th, 2020
Final submissions due:  July 30th, 2020
Expected publication: Fall/Autumn 2020

Call for Participation: Graduate Student Research Survey

Dear All,
As part of a research project for the Management of Archives and Special Collections course at Pratt Institute School of Information, I am conducting a survey on web and PDF accessibility considerations in Archives and Special Collections.

Web Accessibility Survey 
Submissions will be anonymous. The survey is 9 questions and will take about 10 minutes.

If you are able and willing, please complete the survey by Monday, April 27th.
Thanks in advance for your participation, please reach out if you have any questions (hwang63@pratt.edu)

Be well,
Hilary
——————————

Hilary Wang |
MSLIS Graduate Student
(She/her/hers)
PRATT INSTITUTE
hwang63@pratt.edu

ATALM Presentations available

We have good news! The narrated presentations of nineteen sessions recorded at the 2019 Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums (ATALM) Annual Conference, held in Temecula, California, are now available on the Sustainable Heritage Network. Each of these sessions were included in the conference’s Professional Development Certificate program and correlate with either the Library Services and Programs Certificate or the Language Preservation and Revitalization Certificate.

We are pleased to share these ATALM sessions from forty-two experts working in archives, libraries, and museums across the United States. This new set of resources covers language documentation, grant writing and reporting, international collaborations, digital records management, photo digitization, or community engagement, and more. If you were not able to attend one of these ATALM sessions or would like a refresher, visit this collection on the SHN: http://www.sustainableheritagenetwork.org/collection/2019-narrated-presentations

Please note that Professional Development Certificate sessions are organized by their respective focus under the “In this Collection” box in the page linked above.

Thanks to all the session leaders!

Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and MuseumsInstitute of Museum and Library ServicesSIL InternationalLittle Big Horn College Library/ ArchivesAcademy of Motion Picture Arts and SciencesNortheast Document Conservation CenterHuna Heritage FoundationNational Endowment For HumanitiesNational Endowment for the ArtsNational Park ServiceZiibiwing Center of Anishinabe Culture and LifewaysNational Native American Boarding School Healing CoalitionSherman Indian MuseumNorthern Arizona UniversityUBC Museum Of AnthropologyIndigenous Library Services, University of ManitobaQuapaw Tribal LibraryHennepin County LibraryMinnesota Department of EducationHistorypinSustainable MuseumsSaginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe Tribal OperationsUniversity of Alaska Fairbanks Rasmuson LibraryAlaska State LibraryMontana Historical SocietyCatawba Cultural CenterCenter for Digital Scholarship and Curation

Journal of Western Archives Honors Best General Interest Articles 

The recipient of the Journal of Western Archives award for Best General Interest Article is ‘”The Right to Know’: Decolonizing Native American Archives,” which focuses on the movement to restore control of tribal history to Indigenous peoples, by Jennifer O’Neal from the University of Oregon Libraries Special Collections and University Archives. In addition, the committee awarded an honorable mention to “Jumping In: Creating an Assessment Program for the L. Tom Perry Special Collections Reading Room, coauthored by Cindy Brightenburg and SAA Publications Board member Gordon Daines, both from Brigham Young University. “Jumping In” pioneers the application of the new SAA/RBMS guidelines for public service metrics, provides original user services data, and offers a model that can be adapted for use at other institutions. Congrats to all!

New Case Study: Teaching Students Research Methods with Primary Source Analysis

New Case Study: Teaching Students Research Methods with Primary Source Analysis

Archivists and history faculty collaborate to teach students about primary source research in “Scaffolding Primary Source Research and Analysis in an Undergraduate History Research Methods Course” by Kara Flynn, research and educational services archivist at the University of Arkansas. It is the twelfth case in the open access series Case Studies on Teaching With Primary Sources sponsored by SAA’s Reference, Access, and Outreach Section.