Call for Contributions: Special Section of American Archivist

Hello and good day, everyone,

I am writing to you this morning as both a member of the SAA Design Records Section and as an Editorial Board member of the American Archivist. I would like to invite you all to consider writing an article for an upcoming special design records-related section of the journal.

The section will focus on such topics as design records management, repositories, practices, content, challenges, etc. We will also feature an image from a contributing repository for the issue’s cover.

Submitting a written work to AA is a wonderful way to reach out to your peers, contribute to the professional literature, and highlight your innovative practice and special content.

The AA Editor and Editorial Board have designated volume 84, issue 1 (fall/winter 2021) for this dedicated content; the publication/production calendar is:

July 1, 2020: Submissions due
December 2020: Peer review feedback returned and final decisions made
June 2021: Final drafts due

Many submission questions can be answered at www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/submissions. I am also certainly happy to field any questions and you are welcome to write to me off-line (please see my contact information below).

Thank you for considering this invitation; we look forward to your submissions!

Yours,
Karen

——————————
Karen Jamison TRIVETTE, MLS
Assoc. Prof., Head of Special Collections and College Archives
Gladys Marcus Library | Goodman Resource Center | Room E432
Fashion Institute of Technology – SUNY
Seventh Avenue at 27 Street
New York City 10001-5992
www.fitnyc.edu/library
karen_trivette@fitnyc.edu
212 217.4386 office | 212 217.4371 Library fax | 518.526.6307 cell

How to Create an APA Style Reference for a Canceled Conference Presentation

To help slow the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), officials have canceled many public events, including conferences and conventions. This has raised a question for researchers who were planning to present.

Question: How should the APA Style reference for an accepted presentation appear on my CV when the conference has been canceled?

Answer: Include the presentation in your CV, as your work was peer reviewed and accepted, but consider which of the following cases is most applicable.

Note that in the examples shown in this post, the text in brackets varies by the type of contribution, as described in Section 10.5 of the Publication Manual (7th ed.). Options for bracketed text include “Conference session,” “Paper presentation,” “Keynote address,” and so forth. Use the labeling that matches what a user would see in the program or website for the conference.

Read more

Update, plus Archivaria and The Public Historian are open access

Greetings to all-

As I’m sure it has been for many of you, the past couple of weeks have consisted of planning work-from-home projects. I hope to get back to regular posts soon.

In the meantime, Archivaria and The Public Historian have temporarily opened all their content for free access. If you hear of more, send me a message and I’ll share!

Thanks,
Cheryl

Archivaria

Temporary removal of embargo

In response to the public health crisis of COVID-19, we’re pleased to announce that we’ll be making the eight most recent issues of Archivaria freely available to all through this site and on Project Muse. Content from the last four years will now be available free for all until June 30th 2020. As always, all other previous issues are available in the Back Issues section of this site for your reading pleasure during these challenging times!

Posted: 2020-03-23

The Public Historian

Looking for free, unlocked access to The Public Historian
(University of California Press) at this time? As part of the Press’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Press has made arrangements for all of its journal content (including that of The Public Historian) to be made freely available through the end of June. This is to assist the community of libraries, faculty, students, and scholars with access during a time when their usual access is likely disrupted or challenged due to library closures, remote working arrangements, etc. Let us know how this access changes the way you use The Public Historian during this time! https://tph.ucpress.edu

 

Call for Research Survey Participation: Uses of Web Archives in Scholarly Research

Hello all,

You are invited to take a brief survey as part of my research study designed to learn more about the uses of web archives in scholarly research:

https://forms.gle/r4PRi5eCXxGTKyDo7

Participation in this study is voluntary, and will involve 10-15 minutes to complete the survey with questions about your familiarity with, current/potential uses of, and obstacles to using web archives in research. Whether or not you’ve ever used a web archive, your participation is welcome.

There are no known risks associated with your participation in this research beyond those of everyday life. Although you will receive no direct benefits, this research may help the investigator (Mary Bakija, Pratt Institute School of Information/New York Art Resources Consortium (NYARC) Web Archiving Fellow) understand the current and/or potential uses of web archives in research.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

Thank you,
Mary

——————————
Mary Bakija
MSLIS Candidate, Pratt Institute School of Information
NYARC Web Archiving Fellow
mbakija@pratt.edu
——————————

CFP: Multiple conferences, CLIR’s Digital Library Federation

CLIR’s Digital Library Federation is pleased to announce that we have opened Calls for Proposals for our conferences happening over a week this November in Baltimore, Maryland: the DLF Forum, Learn@DLF, Digital Preservation 2020, and this year, CLIR’s Digitizing Hidden Collections Symposium.

For all events, we welcome submissions from members and nonmembers alike. Students, practitioners, and others from any related field are invited to submit for one conference or multiple (though, different proposals for each, please).

  • The DLF Forum (#DLFforum, November 9-11), our signature event, includes digital library practitioners and others from member institutions and the broader community, for whom it serves as a meeting place, marketplace, and congress. In these respects, the event is a chance for attendees to conduct business, present work, share experiences, practices and information, and assess DLF’s programs and progress with community participation and input. Learn more and check out the CFP here: https://forum2020.diglib.org/call-for-proposals
  • Learn@DLF (#LearnAtDLF, November 8) is our dedicated pre-conference workshop day for digging into tools, techniques, workflows, and concepts. Through engaging, hands-on sessions, attendees will gain experience with new tools and resources, exchange ideas, and develop and share expertise with fellow community members. Learn more and check out the CFP here: https://forum2020.diglib.org/learnatdlf/
  • Digital Preservation (#digipres20, November 11-12), NDSA‘s major meeting and conference, will help to chart future directions for both the NDSA and digital stewardship, and is expected to be a crucial venue for intellectual exchange, community-building, development of best practices, and national-level agenda-setting in the field. Learn more and check out the CFP for this year’s event, with the theme Get Active with Digital Preservation, here: https://ndsa.org/digital-preservation-2020-cfp/
  • CLIR’s Digitizing Hidden Collections Symposium (#digHC, November 11-12), is a two-day event for CLIR’s Digitizing Hidden Collections grant recipients and the wider library and archives communities to celebrate and reflect on five years of project work. Recipients’ collective experiences will create opportunities to discuss the current state and future potential of digitization practice in collecting institutions, including how the digital cultural record can better reflect the diversity of human experience, how law and ethics affect strategies for access, and how technologies and standards can improve discovery and learning. Learn more and check out the CFP here: https://www.clir.org/hiddencollections/2020-symposium/call-for-proposals/.

Please keep in mind that submissions for the Digitizing Hidden Collections Symposium should come from current or former participants in CLIR Digitizing Hidden Collections grant projects.

Session options range from 2-minute lighting talk sessions at DigiPres to half-day workshops at Learn@DLF, with many options in between.

New this year, we’ve put together a video with some tips for successful conference proposals. We encourage everyone to watch and incorporate these suggestions clearly into your submissions. Watch the video here: https://youtu.be/xxrIQ273q30

The deadline for all three opportunities is Monday, April 27 at 11:59pm Eastern Time.

If you have any questions, please write to us at forum@diglib.org. We’re looking forward to seeing you in Baltimore.

P.S. Want to stay updated on all things #DLFforum? Subscribe to our Forum newsletter or follow us at @CLIRDLF on Twitter.

Job Opportunity: Consultants for the Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents

The Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents (IEHD) seeks consultants to join its faculty and develop online and in-person training in editing and publishing historical documents. Topics covered will include but are not limited to the following:

  • collecting and cataloging documents
  • selecting which documents to publish
  • digitizing
  • transcribing, and proofreading
  • encoding
  • creating metadata
  • designing, researching and writing annotation
  • conceptualizing, organizing, and designing a publication (whether print or digital)

The IEHD has offered introductory training to small groups of scholars since 1972, and now seeks to expand its audience to include archivists, librarians, teachers, undergraduate students, genealogists, and family historians by creating a free online course to be called Fundamentals of Publishing Historical Documents. We are also designing advanced in-person workshops for further training and skills development.

The IEHD seeks to fill four faculty consultant positions. Faculty will help develop the online Fundamentals course, which will be launched in 2021. The faculty will work with other members of the IEHD in a series of four in-person curriculum workshops at the University of Virginia to conceptualize and develop the Fundamentals course. Each faculty member will be responsible for designing several modules and will contribute to the development of other faculty’s modules. The workshops will take place in summer and fall of 2020, and winter and summer of 2021.

Recognizing that not all who practice editing call themselves editors, we are committed to creating a faculty diverse in disciplinary background. Such a faculty will include practitioners outside the traditional field of editing, as well as practitioners focusing on underrepresented subjects and materials. We thus encourage not only scholarly editors to apply, but also public historians, archivists, and other individuals with experience in the preparation, publication, and promotion of historical records. Preference will be given to candidates with experience teaching in-person or online courses and with demonstrated experience using multiple publication platforms.

To be considered for this position, please send a cover letter and CV via email to Jennifer Stertzer at jes7z@virginia.edu. Deadline for applications is March 27, 2020.

The IEHD is funded by a grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission. Through this program, the NHPRC seeks to increase the number and diversity of historical documentary editors, disseminate knowledge about documentary editing, and build the capacity of attendees as leaders in their own editorial projects and in the related fields of documentary editing, digital history, and digital humanities.

NOTES:
4 openings.
Telecommuting is allowed.

CFP: Time/Location/Mode of Participation Changes: JCDL 2020 Practitioners Track

Due to the COVID-19 outbreak in Wuhan,  JCDL 2020 Organizing Committee has
made the following changes:

• Delay the conference date to August 1-5, 2020, which is right after ACM
SIGIR 2020 (July 25-30, 2020)
• Move the conference site to Xi’an China, which is at the same site as ACM
SIGIR 2020
• Allow virtual attendance/presentation of papers
• Not enforce the “no show” policy

These changes allow JCDL 2020 and SIGIR 2020 to be two conferences that are
back to back. Therefore, it is possible for attendees to attend two important
and relevant conferences with just one trip. The Organizing Committee of JCDL
2020 are working with that of SIGIR 2020 to explore further collaboration
between the two conferences.

JCDL 2020 continues to invite submissions to a newly created Practitioners
Track.

Practitioners Track Proposals

The practitioners track emphasizes innovation, insight, and vision in the
practice of digital libraries. It provides opportunities for libraries,
archives, museums, publishers, and digital content industry partners to
showcase their latest novel, speculative, and even provocative ideas,
practices, case studies, technologies, productions, strategies, datasets, and/
or designs related to digital library practices and services. Topics include
but are not limited to

• practice of emergency planning and response for libraries, archives, and
museums
• digital repositories
• digital collections development and management
• metadata and discovery services
• open access and scholarly communication
• open educational resources
• teaching and learning support
• digital publishing
• big data and library cyberinfrastructure
• research data management, digital curation, and stewardship
• digital humanities
• digital preservation
• information service
• information/data literacy
• digital heritage/culture

Authors must label their submissions with at least one of the following four
streams. Submissions will be evaluated using criteria set forth in the
respective stream. There is no expectation that a submission must cover all
four streams.

1. “I have a dream”. Submissions to this stream should focus on the vision,
speculation, or prophetic prediction of trends on a) the future environment
and/or ecosystem for libraries, museums, archives and related industry and b)
how do we adapt and flourish. Proposals will be mainly evaluated on vision,
novelty, and potential impact. We particularly encourage high-risk high-reward
ideas, as long as the risks are clearly articulated and assessed.

2. “Told you so”. Submissions to this stream provide theoretical,
experimental, computational, synthetic, or empirical proof or myth rebuttal
related to popular and current digital library trends and practices. Proposals
are expected to be well-referenced and balanced, and also offer nuance and
clearly laid-out limitations. The evaluation will be focused on the merits of
the arguments, as well as their potential impacts on the practices.

3. “We can do it”. Submission to this steam showcase exemplary projects,
products, or services that have already been launched. Proposals may be
further broken down into substreams such as a) “We did it first”, where
novelty and differentiation factors are highlighted; b) “We do it best”, which
focuses on the overall value gained by the patrons, communities, and the
society; or c) “We can do better”, which highlights critical improvements.
Proposals in this stream will be evaluated on the verifiable benefits these
projects bring.

4. “Together we’ll go far”. Submissions to this stream emphasize broad
collaborations, e.g., those beyond boundaries of departments, libraries,
institutions, academic disciplines, communities, regions, or even countries.
Authors should clearly articulate what, how, and why the collaboration works
and what values the collaboration brings to each partner.

Proposals should consist of a title, extended abstract, and contact
information for the authors, and should not exceed 2 pages. As indicated in
the JCDL 2020 Call for Submissions, Practitioners Track submissions should use
the ACM Proceedings template
(http://www.acm.org/publications/proceedings-template) and are to be submitted
in electronic format via the conference’s EasyChair submission page
(https://easychair.org/my/conference?conf=jcdl2020).

Accepted proposals to the Practitioners Track will be included in the
conference proceedings and will be presented at the conference in visual
formats including but are not limited to posters, videos, or system and
production demonstrations. At least one author of each accepted proposal is
expected to give a one-minute presentation.

All questions concerning the practitioners track proposals should be discussed
with the track co-chairs prior to the submission deadline of April 6, 2020.
Notification of acceptance is April 27, 2020 . This year’s practitioners track
co-chairs are:

Zhiwu Xie, Virginia Tech Libraries, USA zhiwuxie@vt.edu
Long Xiao, Peking University Library, China, China lxiao@lib.pku.edu.cn
Wei Liu, Shanghai Library, China kevenlw@gmail.com