Recent Issue: Archivaria

Latest Issue – Archivaria 88 (Fall 2019)
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Articles
Reciprocal Archival Imaginaries: The Shifting Boundaries of “Community” in Community Archives
GRACEN BRILMYER, JOYCE GABIOLA, JIMMY ZAVALA & MICHELLE CASWELL

The Trust in Archives–Trust in Digital Archival Content Framework
DEVAN RAY DONALDSON

“Treat Them with the Reverence of Archivists”: Records Work, Grief Work, and Relationship Work in the Archives
JENNIFER DOUGLAS, ALEXANDRA ALISAUSKAS, AND DEVON MORDELL

Investigating the Impact of the Living Archives on Eugenics in Western Canada
WENDY DUFF, JEFFERSON SPORN, AND EMILY HERRON

In Critical Condition: (Un)Becoming Bodies in Archival Acts of Truth Telling
JAMIE A. LEE

Counterpoint
For the Purpose of Accountability: The Need for a Comprehensive Recordkeeping Act
D. RICHARD VALPY

Book Reviews
Matthew Harle, Afterlives of Abandoned Work: Creative Debris in the Archive
AMY MARSHALL FURNESS

Jordan Landes and Richard Espley, eds., Radical Collections: Re-Examining the Roots of Collections, Practices and Information Professions
JENNIFER GRANT

Trevor Owens, The Theory and Craft of Digital Preservation
EVELYN MCLELLAN

Obituary
Elizabeth Blight, 1944-2019

Letter to the Editor
Ray Edmondson

CFP: JELIS Issue on Creative Approaches to Teaching and Pedagogy (Journal of Education for Library and Information Science)

Opportunity for archival educators:

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JELIS Special Issue: Volume 62, 2021

JELIS would like to announce the opening for submissions to a Special Issue of the journal (Volume 62, Issue 3, 2021). The Issue theme is as follows:

Creative approaches to teaching and pedagogy

Topics including, but not limited to:

  • Construction of positive learning outcomes
  • Engagement of students in course content
  • Innovative assessment techniques
  • Employment of learning theories
  • Utilization of learning management systems
  • Peer learning strategies
  • Creative syllabus development
  • Advances in assignments for students
  • Employment of tactics from other disciplines
  • Sage and guide
  • Communicative action and teaching
  • Students as teachers
  • The field of creativity studies and its contribution to LIS education and pedagogy

Submissions (see the JELIS guidelines at https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458) may be made in the “Special Issue Papers” section of ScholarOne. Submit only completed papers. The submission is open until September 30, 2020. The submitted papers will be assessed according to the following criteria:

  • Importance of the research question
  • Inclusiveness of the literature review
  • Appropriateness of the methodology
  • Reporting of the findings
  • Quality of the presentation

CFP: Research Methods & Social Justice in LIS: Special issue of IJIDI (International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion)

This call is geared towards librarians, but there is potential for archivists’ voices.

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

A Special Issue of The International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI)

INTERSECTING THEORIES AND METHODS
TO RESEARCH SOCIAL JUSTICE IN LIS SCHOLARSHIP

We invite contributions for a special issue of TheInternational Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI) (http://publish.lib.umd.edu/IJIDI) on the topic of “Intersecting Theories and Methods to Research Social Justice in LIS Scholarship.” We welcome full research papers that make a novel contribution to library and information science (LIS) scholarship, whether empirical, methodological, theory-based, pedagogical, and/or practical in nature. We also ask for Expressions of Interest contributions for a special section on notes-from-the-field, LIS student work, works-in-progress, opinion pieces, and professional reports.

The goal of this special issue is to bring together voices of both emerging scholars and established researchers from a wide range of interdisciplinary perspectives and paradigmatic roots that embrace social justice as an intentional and deliberate strategy in LIS scholarship to generate impact via their information-related work. The term “scholarship” is intentionally used to include documentation and analysis through intersecting lens of diverse theories and methods to implement social justice in LIS practice and research, education and teaching, policy development, service design, and program implementation, among other areas. This collection will showcase exemplars of LIS scholarship from across local, regional, national, and international contexts.

Thus, this special issue will provide examples of study that adopt rigorous models, frameworks, theories, methods, and approaches in LIS research to further social justice and inclusion advocacy in the field. In the process, this collection will fill gaps in showcasing intersections of LIS and interdisciplinary theories with traditional and non-traditional methods of research to further social justice principles of fairness, justice, and equality/equity for all people, including those on the margins of society.

Topics and subjects that expound the intersection of LIS theories and methods may include:

  • Implementing social justice within various domains (e.g., agriculture/rural, diversity, economy, education, health, information technology, law, manufacturing and industry, public policy, social welfare, etc.);
  • Addressing social justice issues related to the information creation-organization-management-dissemination-use processes, critical research design of socio-technical systems, or human information behavior of underserved or disenfranchised populations;
  • Examining problematic dimensions associated with information poverty, marginalization, information literacy of diverse patrons, privileged access and use, biased communication behaviors, information “expert” versus information user, and oppressive technologies;
  • Exploring ways in which LIS programs worldwide are seeking to develop and implement systematic approaches to integrate social justice, social equity, inclusion advocacy, critical information literacies and engaged scholarship while partnering with minority and underserved populations to make meaningful changes in LIS curriculum and discourse.

We invite fully developed research papers for the Articles section (original empirical research, conceptual and theoretical papers), as well as shorter submissions for the Special section (notes-from-the-field, LIS student work, works-in-progress, opinion pieces, and professional reports).

Submission Process – Important Dates

This special issue of IJIDI is scheduled for publication in January 2021. The following submission timeline applies:

31 March, 2020: Abstracts and Expressions of interest (name, role and affiliation: extended abstracts of up to 1,000 words for full research papers, and 250-500 words for contributions to the special section). Please email your submissions to: bmehra@ua.edu.

30 April, 2020: Notification of acceptance

1 July, 2020: Full papers due

January 2021: Special issue published
This issue will be guest edited by: Bharat Mehra, Endowed Chair in Social Justice and Professor, University of Alabama, USA (bmehra@ua.edu)

Author Guidelines and Peer Review Process
Please consult IJIDI Author Guidelines and IJIDI Peer Review Process at: https://jps.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/ijidi/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Any questions related to this issue should be addressed to: bmehra@ua.edu

New Journal: Reviews in Digital Humanities

Welcome to Reviews in Digital Humanities

Reviews in Digital Humanities, edited by Dr. Jennifer Guiliano and Dr. Roopika Risam, is the pilot of a peer-reviewed journal and project registry that facilitates scholarly evaluation and dissemination of digital humanities work and its outputs. We accept submissions of projects that blend humanistic and technical inquiry in a broad range of methods, disciplines, scopes, and scales. These include but are not limited to: digital archives, multimedia or multimodal scholarship, digital exhibits, visualizations, digital games, and digital tools. We particularly encourage submission of digital scholarship in critical ethnic, African diaspora, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian American, and postcolonial studies. Submit your work or contact the editors at reviewsindigitalhumanities@gmail.com.

Call for Papers: Intimacy and Interaction The 2020 Meeting of the American Society for Ethnohistory

Though this call does not mention archives, it may be of interest to those who work with tribal collections.

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Intimacy and Interaction

The 2020 Meeting of the American Society for Ethnohistory

Durham, North Carolina

The program committee of the 2020 ASE conference invites submissions for the annual meeting to take place on November 4-8, 2020 in downtown Durham, North Carolina.  We invite panel proposals on any topic related to ethnohistory and especially within this year’s theme: Intimacy and Interaction.  The program committee encourages thematic panels that include perspectives from both North and Latin America, as well as panels that include perspectives from other areas of the world.

As you think about the topic of Intimacy and Interaction, we note that the re-structuring to which this CFP refers includes religious ceremonialism, language, re-adjustments of spatial configurations of families and communities, and the simple exigencies of material and cultural survival. We ask you to consider such questions as: How have indigenous peoples structured notions of intimacy and intimate relationships? How have colonial rule, settler colonialism, and empire formation forced a restructuring of intimate interactions between people both within indigenous communities and between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples? How have extended families, family networks, and communities been altered or disrupted (often violently) by colonial and neocolonial forces? How has the law been used to alter, limit, control, or outlaw intimate relationships within indigenous societies or between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples? How have capitalism, neoliberalism, globalization and other institutional forces altered notions of intimate relationships among indigenous peoples? How have indigenous and non-indigenous peoples responded to these structural forces?

We will consider proposals for multiple formats including panels, roundtables, and public workshops, but we strongly encourage creativity, moving beyond the typical 20-minute paper presentation format. We also strongly encourage individuals who have paper ideas to get together with others through various forums in order to meet other people working on related topics.  If you are thinking about an individual paper, please post on H-AmIndian, H-LatAm, H-Borderlands, or similar listservs to find others who are interested in presenting related papers.

If you have any questions about proposals, please email the program committee assistant at ethnohistory@duke.edu.

Please note that panels can consist of three to four papers, while roundtables and “working-groups/workshops” can be more loosely formatted by each organizer, but all need to adhere to each session’s 90-minute time slot.  Please ensure your proposal has a designated chair.  You may include a separate commentator before audience discussion, or you may designate the panel chair as commentator or discussion facilitator.  To maximize time for audience discussion, we ask papers to be 15-20 minutes (in a three-paper panel) or 10-15 minutes (in a 4-paper panel), with formal commentary no longer than 5 minutes.  Complete panel proposals with a chair and/or a commentator are preferred, but individual paper proposals will also be considered.

Submission Deadline: May 1, 2020

For each submission, organizers need to include:

  1. The session’s title
  2. Organizer’s name, title, and institutional affiliation
  3. Participant’s names, titles, and institutional affiliations

In addition, for each type of session listed below, the organizer must submit the relevant material:

  • Panels: panel abstract, titles and abstracts of all papers, abstracts not to be longer than 150 words
  • Roundtables: 300 word description of the topic and goals of the discussion
  • Working-groups/workshops: 300 word description of the topic and goals of the workshop

To submit, please have all required documentation collated into a single pdf file, named with the last name of the session’s organizer. It is not necessary to register for the conference in order to have a paper or panel accepted. Once papers and panels are accepted, however, each participant must register as an ASE member.

Email all proposals to: ethnohistory@duke.edu

CFP: Collaborate, Connect, Transform: A partnership of world experts in media and audiovisual archives, The joint 2020 IASA – FIAT/IFTA conference

Call for presentations

Collaborate, Connect, Transform: A partnership of world experts in media and audiovisual archives”

The joint 2020 IASA – FIAT/IFTA conference

Call for Proposals
(submission deadline: 16 March 2020)

In an age where global audiovisual communication has become a highway of social media traffic, audiovisual records offer us the opportunity to transcend the limitations of time and place.  Audiovisual archives convey messages from one era to another. It is the audiovisual archivist’s responsibility that the messages captured are reliable, authentic, persistent and complete. The convergence of technical, organisational and social-political realities are now challenges that can no longer be tackled in isolation. With an explosion of content creation audiovisual archive experts are a vital connector between publishers, industry, technology, policy makers and cultural heritage bodies.

Technological advancements help archives collect, manage and share their collections more efficiently. Audiovisual media archivists need to be open to this evolution. It is the job of the archive industry to redefine heritage and future access methods in this new technology driven multimedia landscape. Therefore, for the first time in 25 years, the FIAT/IFTA Executive Council and the IASA Board have decided to join forces and organize a joint conference with an integrated programme. The 51st IASA Conference will unite with the 44th FIAT/IFTA World Conference. Together with our host RTÉ, a long-standing and active member of both, we bring together the two leading associations in broadcast, media, sound and audiovisual archiving.

Dublin is widely recognized as a hub of technological innovation, it is like much of Ireland, a vibrant destination that boasts a young progressive demographic while steeped in the maturity of a learning and artistic culture, revered internationally. For the goals of the FIAT/IFTA – IASA Joint Conference 2020 our host venue, Trinity College Dublin is an excellent fit.  From the Book of Kells to the Oscar Wilde Collection, it is home to ancient as well as recent cultural icons. Since its founding in the 16th century, Trinity aims to grow, preserve and disseminate knowledge, a mission it shares with IASA and FIAT/IFTA alike.

We welcome proposals on the following topics:

A. Turning the temporary into the everlasting

While time is running out for analogue sound and moving image carriers to be digitized, the challenges of the digital domain are already awaiting us: do we just continue to carefully collect, monitor, and document, or are we already venturing into large-scale transcoding, rewrapping, and normalisation? And isn’t it about time to start working on that big pile of films that we have always pushed back? We’d love to hear you talk about:

  • Accept, ignore, transform or discard? Strategies to cope with unsustainable file formats
  • Obsolete digital carriers: efficient approaches for mixed media collections
  • Your best 5 dollars spent in preservation: stories of optimising cost and quality as well
  • Advocating, planning and realising film digitisation at large

B. Increasing efficiency in media management and metadata creation

With ever higher quantities of objects and files acquired, stored, edited and accessed, keeping control of the traffic running on your archival highways is paramount. To all these processes, metadata is crucial and artificial intelligence is helping us with that, but introducing it into your archive brings technical, ethical and organisational questions. Our audience will be interested in a presentation tackling:

  • Efficiency measurement and comparison of methods of metadata creation
  • Working with the big ones in AI: wolves in sheep’s clothing or unmissable opportunity?
  • From monolith to Lego set: build-your-own, modular and open source in media management
  • Player, coach or referee? Archivist’s and media manager’s roles in the news and sports rooms of the future

C. As open as possible, but not more than that

Free and open to all is definitely a commendable goal, but it’s hardly ever applicable to a complete collection. Ethical, commercial and legal rules are indispensable in the operation of audiovisual archives and therefore deserve our attention. How to answer questions about who gets access to what, how, when, and where?

  • Justified inaccessibility: access restriction for ethical reasons
  • Copyright: raising awareness about rules, opportunities and threats
  • Making audiovisual archival content accessible for people with disabilities
  • Role divisions or collaborations? Audiovisual digitisation, preservation and access between broadcasters and national (audiovisual) archives

D. The social role of archives here and now

What we preserve carries the truths and values of the past. In addition, many social movements accumulate their own audiovisual archive, thus shaping their own image and a set of historical sources for the future. This makes the archive nolens volens an actor that cannot stay on the sidelines, especially in a time of polarisation. But how do we respond to what is happening around us? When do we come to the fore? Do we offer a forum for debate, or do we also take a position, and for what purpose?

  • Storytelling, new and interactive forms such as podcasts, vlogs and other contemporary means to tell and prove archival value(s)
  • Archives as (big) data: mining the audiovisual collections for unexplored narratives
  • Strongholds of trust: the audiovisual archive’s role in fact checking and unmasking fake news
  • The value of public service in public service broadcasting archives: a matter of independence, neutrality or diversity?
  • Users and user practices: new practices of archival access in the digital age, addressing academic, educational and public communities

E. Future proofing the archive: towards new structures and skill sets

To gain global recognition of their profession, audiovisual archivists have to conquer their place. But a credible claim that audiovisual archiving is a profession in its own right can’t be supported by expensive words only. Professionalization and continuous adaptation of the archive as an organization have become a necessity. Therefore we’d welcome papers about:

  • Academic training and certification in audiovisual archiving: necessity or luxury?
  • Radio and TV collections under the same roof: between shared solutions and respect for specificity.
  • Audiovisual collections in archives with a broader scope: no longer the odd one out?
  • Redesigning audiovisual heritage landscapes: regional, national, continental collaborations
  • The broadcast archive in the public media landscape

F. The business of archives

Media archives form part of global enterprises today, with demand for content on new platforms and services continuing to grow and be re-invented. Where does the archive process fit into this model? We welcome insights into the sector from traditional and new business perspectives, services and the impacts of technologies through case studies which enhance the use and value of archives.

  • What are the business imperatives of managing archives for revenue generation in different organisations? Who are the new players?
  • What are the latest trends and tools which promote archive value in the commercial and professional markets?
  • Is the market contracting or expanding? Where do archives and commercial libraries meet? Is there a correlation?

Send us your proposal

We welcome presentations based on user experiences, new initiatives or perspectives, striking conclusions, successes but also failures. Your story is welcome, also if you’re sure that it is not amongst the world’s most advanced ones. The main objective is to share knowledge and results with audiovisual archives professionals in order to understand the lessons learned and new challenges or solutions arising. The topics mentioned above reflect current interests and evolutions. Suggestions for subjects not mentioned are equally welcome but should be contextualised thoroughly.

The conference will have different presenting formats:

FORMAT TYPE DURATION FORMAT INFORMATION
Keynote 45 minutes Keynote speakers will be decided by the Programme Committee
Parallel session presentation 25 minutes A presentation with 5 minutes for Q&A, selected by the Programme Committee from the proposals submitted.
Workshop 3 or 6 hours An in-depth, interactive session, with a strong hands-on component, selected by the Programme Committee from the proposals submitted.
Expert led discussion panel 1 hour An in-depth discussion among more than 2 experts, introduced briefly and led by 1 moderator expert in the subject discussed. Selected by the Programme Committee from the proposals submitted.
Poster To be decided A poster option may be offered to present a summary of a project or key insights through texts, schemes and images, on a poster in a central location of the conference venue at an appointed time slot. Selected by the Programme Committee from the proposals submitted.

If you would like to present your work during the 2020 FIAT/IFTA – IASA Joint Conference, we ask you to submit:

  1. working title of your proposal
  2. an abstract of your proposal (300 words max)
  3. the name(s) and a short bio of the proposed speaker(s), moderator or author(s) (150 words max.)
  4. the kind of format you’d like to see your contribution included in (see above)

Please submit your proposal by completing the form below
by Monday 16 March 2020

The selection of presentations will be made in April by the Programme Committee. The presenters will receive their notification via email after this selection, in the last week of April 2020. The Programme Committee reserves the right to propose to the candidates to present in a different format.

Please note:

  • Speakers are required to cater for their own costs related to travel, stay and conference registration. In order to avoid late speaker withdrawals as much as possible, speakers will be required to register before the early bird deadline passes.
  • FIAT/IFTA and IASA intend to award a number of grants allowing less financially privileged speakers to attend the conference. More details will be announced in the following months. To stay informed please keep an eye on the FIAT/IFTA and IASA websites and social media channels.
  • Commercial companies are welcome to the stage, but their proposals are will only be accepted if they are presenting dual-client case studies, technological breakthroughs, or academically generalized topics. Presentations with an overly commercial tone of voice are generally not appreciated by our audience and will not be accepted by the Programme Committee..
  • All presentations at the conference may be recorded via audiovisual media and photos, in accordance with section 8 of the FIAT/IFTA Privacy and Data Processing Statement. If you explicitly would like to avoid this, please let us know via conferences@iasa-web.org.
  • By submitting the form below, you confirm that you have read and agree to the terms stated on this page.

Form available on their website.

CFP: ICHORA 2020 Archives and the Digital World

Call for Papers

The 9th International Conference on the History of Records and Archives (ICHORA) will be held at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.A. from October 29 to 31, 2020. Submit paper proposals to ICHORA2020@umich.edu by March 30, 2020.

ICHORA 9 will focus on Archives and the Digital World. Digital technologies have been in use for over 70 years and were, in fact, late additions to a whirlwind of new record-making and -keeping technologies that began a century before that transformed the creation, transmission, preservation, representation, and interpretation of records and archives. Digital technologies mediate how the past is documented, remembered, and commemorated. Digital recordkeeping and society are mutually constituted, a relationship that is far-reaching and challenging to predict. Despite claims of ubiquity, digital infrastructures are culturally, linguistically and historically specific, often maintaining and reinscribing longstanding power imbalances that have favoured some groups and marginalized others; but sometimes affording new opportunities for resistance to the mainstream, used by subcultures to advance their survivance, and by other groups to maintain cultural diversity.

The Program Committee seeks contributions to ICHORA 9 that will stimulate critical reflection on the evolution and development of records, archives, archival forms/genres and archival institutions in relation to the histories of digital technologies and ongoing digital transformations. Examinations of the relationship of digital technologies to indigenous communities and knowledge systems, the use of digital technologies to enhance equality or further reinforce inequality for marginalized and underrepresented communities, as well as the deployment of digital technologies in archives of resistance, activism and resurgence, are especially welcome. Areas of focus and possible topics may include:

  • Archives, digital studies, media studies and histories of the digital;
  • Non-digital media precursors of digital record making and keeping technologies;
  • Future(s) of electronic incunabula;
  • Digitization, surrogacy, and materiality of digital objects (and the reimagined future of the non-digital archive);
  • Evolution of access and preservation infrastructures, systems, platforms and analytical tools including the cloud, emulation and data visualizations;
  • Development of standards, guidelines and approaches for digital recordkeeping and digital preservation;
  • Algorithmic appraisal, acquisition, and description, including building and sustaining social media archives, and approaches to their analysis and use;
  • Histories of digital recordkeeping including punched card preservation, EDRMS, Web archiving, blockchain, and whole platform preservation;
  • Recordkeeping technologies in surveillance and policing (and how this has affected marginalized communities);
  • Postcolonialism and decolonization, particularly the role of the digital in reflecting alternative ideological approaches to archives and records;
  • Intersection of digital archiving, maintenance work, and historical trajectory of digital archival labor; and
  • Implications of the digital for copyright, privacy, ownership, trust and ethics.

Submission and Proposal Deadline: Proposals for 20 minute papers are invited. Abstracts of 450-500 words and a short bio should be sent to ICHORA2020@umich.edu by March 30, 2020. We will advise acceptance by May 8, 2020. Following the conference, presenters may be invited to submit their contributions for a peer-reviewed publication.

Previous ICHORA conferences took place in Toronto (2003), Amsterdam (2005; 2015), Boston (2007), Perth (2008), London (2010), Austin (2012), and Melbourne (2018).

Program Committee:

  • Ricardo L. Punzalan, Program Committee Chair, University of Michigan, U.S.A.
  • Greg Bak, University of Manitoba, Canada
  • Iyra Buenrostro-Cabbab, University of the Philippines Diliman, Philippines
  • Jenny Bunn, University College London, U.K.
  • Stanley Griffin, University of the West Indies, Jamaica
  • Anthea Josias, University of the Western Cape, South Africa
  • James Lowry, University of Liverpool, U.K.
  • Heather MacNeil, University of Toronto, Canada
  • Gillian Oliver, Monash University, Australia
  • Valentina Rojas Rojo, National Archives of Chile, Chile
  • Eric Stoykovich, Trinity College, U.S.A.
  • Naya Sucha-xaya, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand
  • Tonia Sutherland, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, U.S.A.
  • Ciaran Trace, University of Texas at Austin, U.S.A.