CFP: Sharing Polar Cultures and Knowledge: Perspectives from Libraries and Archives

First call for submission of proposals for oral presentations, posters and panel sessions for the 28th Polar Libraries Colloquy to be held in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, from June 7 to June 13, 2020.

Go to the Submissions page

Theme

The theme of the Colloquy is Sharing Polar Cultures and Knowledge: Perspectives from Libraries and Archives.

Do librarians and archivists have a significant role in sharing Indigenous and non-Indigenous northern cultures? Do they still have a real impact in 2019 on the transmission of knowledge related to the polar world? How can the physical and virtual spaces of libraries and archive centres remain, in the era of information and communication technologies, essential places for sharing cultures and knowledge about the North and the Poles? The organizers invite you to submit papers on projects, services or thoughts related to these issues. Within the context of libraries and archives, the following sub-themes could be addressed:

  • Cultural exchanges and connections between Indigenous and non-Indigenous northern communities.
  • Transmission of Indigenous and non-Indigenous northern traditional knowledge and practices.
  • First Nations involvement in information management, preservation or dissemination.
  • Reconciliation and decolonization of libraries and archives.
  • Enhancement of heritage documents related to polar cultures and knowledge.
  • Popularization of major social and environmental issues and democratization of scientific knowledge related to northern or polar territories.
  • Establishing a culture of data preservation and sharing among northern or polar researchers.
  • Interdisciplinary and intersectoral management of research data on northern or polar territories.
  • Contributions from libraries or archive centres to foster the practice of interdisciplinarity in research on northern and polar territories.

NOTE : All information professionals are invited to the Colloquy. Proposals on other subjects related to northern or polar information will also be considered.

Presentations

Submissions are invited for papers presentations, posters and panel discussions. Abstract must contain a maximum of 250 words.

Paper presentation

Time allocated for oral presentations is 20 minutes, plus a 10-minute period for questions and discussions after the presentation. Conference papers will be published in the proceedings of the Colloquy, with the authors’ permission.

Posters

Submitting a poster can be an equally interesting alternative to share your ideas, projects or expertise connected the theme of the Colloquy, or another topic related to polar information.

The posters will be displayed in the main conference room during the week and the authors will be asked to present them at pre-determined times. The exact times will be specified when the program is finalized.

The recommended poster size is 84,1 × 118,9 cm (33.1 in × 46.8 in), vertical orientation (portrait). Please note that the organizers can print the posters for you.

Panel discussions

You can propose a panel discussion concerning topics related to the theme of the Colloquy. Panel discussions normally last an hour and include three to five participants.

Timeline for papers, posters or panel discussion proposals

  • January 31, 2020 – Submissions deadline (new deadline: February 28, 2020)
  • February 14, 2020 – Acceptance notification (new acceptance notification date: March 6, 2020)
  • May 22, 2020 – Sending PowerPoint and other visual presentations to the organizers.

Conference registration is required in order to present an oral communication, a poster or a panel discussion. The PLC Steering Committee may be able to provide financial assistance via the Hubert Wenger Award.

Go to the Submissions page

Proceedings

The organizers undertake to publish the conference proceedings in an open access venue. The conference proceedings will include the full article for each oral presentation and copies of posters. For this purpose, the accepted oral presenters or poster presenters must send the full text of their presentation or copies of their poster before the conference, by 1 june 2020 and complete a publication permission that will be sent to them with the acceptance notification.

Questions about this call for papers? Please feel free to contact us at plc2020@bibl.ulaval.ca .

We look forward to your participation!

ACRL’s Publications in Librarianship Monograph Series Announces First Open Peer Review

This has nothing to do with archives, but I find this a very interesting project – to have an open peer-review. Anyone can participate as long as they agree to the terms.


ACRL’s Publications in Librarianship (PIL) series—a peer-reviewed collection of books that examine emerging theories and research—is launching its first open peer review, for Stories of Open: Opening Peer Review through Narrative Inquiry by Emily Ford.

“Open access, open data, open science, and other ‘open’ initiatives bring democratization and transparency to scholarly publishing and access to information,” said PIL Editor Daniel C. Mack. “Rather than limiting the assessment and evaluation of research to a single editor or editorial board, open peer review empowers the entire community of scholars to participate in the review process. Stories of Open presents readers with a thought-provoking introduction to open peer review; we couldn’t imagine a better manuscript for our pilot open review.”

The manuscript is open for comment through Monday, March 23, 2020. It is available for review in two places, and we welcome and encourage your participation: First, via Google documents here, where participants will need to use their Google account and request access at the top left before commenting. Doing so means agreeing to the reviewer’s code of conduct. A PDF version of the manuscript is available for review on the ACRL site. Comments should be sent to Daniel C. Mack at dmack@umd.edu.

Stories of Open is expected to publish in early 2021. Previous PIL books can be found in the ALA Store; information on publishing in the series is here. Questions on the review, process, or publishing with ACRL can be sent to ACRL Content Strategist Erin Nevius at enevius@ala.org.

Call for pitches and manuscripts: Commemoration and Public History

Read the full post from NCPH

We invite reports from the field by public historians about the challenges of commemoration at museums and archives, online, or in your community at large. Submissions might address upcoming and recent national and international anniversaries (such as the American Revolution, 9/11, the 19th Amendment, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Stonewall uprising, and World War I).

But we also want to hear about local or regional site-specific commemorations of less widely known people, places, or events. All submissions should engage with the historiography of commemoration and what or whom is being commemorated and should provide readers with portable lessons or best practices for doing public history.  As always, we welcome and encourage international perspectives.

Successful submissions will address one or more of the following questions:

  • What can we learn about the practice of public history from commemorations of people, places, or events?
  • What counts as commemoration?
  • In what new ways are public historians remembering local or regional history?
  • Who are the stakeholders and collaborators for these projects?
  • What forms does commemoration take, and what are public historians getting right and wrong?
  • Who is included in commemoration, and who is left out?
  • What role does material culture play in how we commemorate the past?
  • What purpose does commemoration serve, and how does it change over time?

New: Software Preservation Bibliography

The Software Preservation Network (SPN) is delighted to announce the release of the Software Preservation Bibliography.

Created by SPN’s Training & Education Working Group, the Bibliography is a living, curated Zotero library of resources, tools, organizations, and research related to software preservation. The Bibliography currently contains over fifty resources that span multiple formats including reports, presentations, grant proposals, blog posts, worksheets, and more!

The Software Preservation Bibliography is a living resource that can be added to as new software preservation resources become available. Aware of a resource that isn’t yet represented? Let us know via this Google Form. SPN’s Training & Education Working Group will perform batch updates on a regular basis.
If you have any questions about the Bibliography, please reach out to Katherine Boss at katherine.boss@nyu.edu.
Best wishes,
Jess (on behalf of SPN’s Training & Education Working Group)

Jess Farrell | she/her/hers
Community Facilitator
Software Preservation Network and BitCurator Consortium
Educopia Institute