Call for Chapters: Access, Control, and Dissemination in Digital Humanities

While DH is seen by some as especially interdisciplinary or more conducive to group work, linked data, and open research, including both access to results and participation in research itself, the very nature of its connectedness creates challenges for researchers who wish to assert control of data, have some role in how data is used or how work is acknowledged, and how it is attributed and recorded. Researchers involved in any substantial DH project must confront similar questions: who should be allowed to make reproductions of artifacts, which ones, how many, how often, of what quality and at what cost, what are the rights of possession and reproduction, including access, copyright, intellectual property rights or digital rights management. Given the potential of open and accessible data, it is sometimes suggested that DH might be a much-needed bridge between ivory tower institutions and the general public. The promise of DH in this regard, however, still remains in many ways unfulfilled, raising the question of who DH is for, if not solely for bodies of like-minded academics.

Contributors to this volume have varied experiences with applications for digital technology in the classroom, in museums and archives, and with the general public and they present answers to these problems from a variety of perspectives. Digital Humanities is not a homogeneous enterprise, and we find that DH functions differently in different fields across the humanities and is put to different ends with varying results. As a result, one may already (fore)see DH moving in distinct directions in individual academic fields, but whether this splintering will have a positive effect or is an indication that disciplines are retreating to their respective silos, remains to be seen. We need to understand better how such differences are communicated among various fields, and how those results are adopted, not to mention evaluated, and by whom. This volume addresses these issues with concrete examples from researchers in the field.

The editors have been working with Routledge to prepare a proposal for publication. Successful submissions will be included in a proposed volume based on a workshop held at Carleton University in May, 2016 (http://dhworkshop.ca/).

Editors:
Dr. Richard Mann, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario
Richard.Mann at carleton.ca

Dr. Shane Hawkins, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario
shane_hawkins at carleton.ca

Proposals Submission Deadline: 01 May 2018
Notification of Acceptance: 31 May 2018
Submission Date: 30 November 2018

Submission Procedure

You are invited to submit a word document with title of the proposal and abstract (500-800 words) and a CV. All proposals should be submitted to the following address: shane_hawkins at carleton.ca

Deadline is 01 May 2018.

Authors will be notified of a final decision by 31 May 2018 and asked to send a full text by 30 November 2018. The chapter’s length will be 5000-7000 words. Submitted chapters should not have been previously published or sent to another editor.

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