Webinar: Writing for History Publications

Archivists have appeared in these publications, and if you’re looking to reach beyond archival professional publications, this is a great opportunity.

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NCPH is partnering with the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) on a “Writing for History Publications” webinar. NCPH members can get a code for a discounted rate by emailing ncph@iupui.edu

Every project has a story, and the field wants to hear yours! Public history publications offer a way to share your research and experiences with others, gather feedback from across the field, and make connections for future partnerships. But how do you get started? Join editors from AASLH, NCPH, and Nursing Clio to learn about sharing your work through magazines, journals, and blogs. We’ll cover the basics of submitting work to History News, the AASLH blog, The Public HistorianHistory@Work, and the Nursing Clio blog, with tips on choosing your platform and focus.

DATE: May 30, 2019

TIME: 3:00 – 4:15 pm EASTERN (Remember to adjust for your time zone!)

COST: $40 Members of AASLH and NCPH (NCPH members email ncph@iupui.edu for a discount code) / $65 Nonmembers

For a full description and to register visit https://aaslh.org/event/webinar-writing-for-history-publications/ .

New Translations: IASA-TC 03

While this is not scholarly per se, I want to highlight the new Portuguese and German translations of the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives’ Safeguarding of the Audiovisual Heritage: Ethics, Principles and Preservation Strategy (IASA-TC 03). Congrats to IASA on their great work!

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IASA is excited to announce the release of a German translation of The Safeguarding of the Audiovisual Heritage: Ethics, Principles and Preservation Strategy (IASA-TC 03). The new translation is available as a PDF only on the web edition page for TC 03 here: https://www.iasa-web.org/tc03/ethics-principles-preservation-strategy

IASA thanks Dietrich Schüller and Kurt Deggeller for their extraordinary work in ensuring the completion and publication of this new translation.

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IASA is excited to announce the release of a Portuguese (Brazilian) translation of The Safeguarding of the Audiovisual Heritage: Ethics, Principles and Preservation Strategy (IASA-TC 03). The new translation is available as a PDF only on the web edition page for TC 03 here: https://www.iasa-web.org/tc03/ethics-principles-preservation-strategy

IASA thanks Ariane Gervásio and Marco Dreer for their extraordinary work in ensuring the completion and publication of this new translation. IASA also thanks members of the Associação Brasileira de Preservação Audiovisual (ABPA), especially Carlos Roberto de Souza, Igor Calado, and Ines Aisengart Menezes, for their assistance with reviewing the translation for publication.

CFP: Special Issue, Meta: Translators’ Journal

Meta: Translators’ Journal calls for papers dedicated to the archives of literary translators. Literary authorship has long been studied from a genetic perspective, yet only recently have literary translators’ working documents—their research notes, drafts, revisions, proofs, their manuscripts, contracts and correspondence—become a focus of translation process research. The emergence of genetic translation studies (Cordingley and Montini 2015) has coincided with a heightened interest in translators’ creativity and agency stimulated by post-structuralist and sociological approaches, and the advent of ‘translator studies’. Despite a growing number of case studies engaging with translators’ avant-textes, translation studies is yet to have its ‘archival turn’. Unlike other disciplines in the humanities, such as philosophy, literature, history, or sociology, in translation studies there has been little reflection upon the concept or function of the archive. Historically, most translators’ papers survived incidentally, because the translator was also a literary author. However, the general revaluing of translation and the rise of translation studies has begun to attract institutional investment in the form of the purchasing or collecting of translators’ papers, manuscripts and materials, and the creation of translation archives.

Articles are encouraged to introduce transdisciplinary perspectives that resonate with theories or notions of the archive in other disciplines. The translation archive can be conceptualised within book history or sociological approaches to the archive as an artefact or space inscribed with the material history of a translator’s work—such as a hard drive, box of manuscript pages, a private study, an office, an online forum, a curated collection, an uncatalogued library holding—sites that witness the labour of translation and its relationship to its environment, collaborators and other semiotic systems. It may be conceptualised within the parameters of genetic criticism as a dossier génétique, a series of texts that attest a translation’s genesis over time to reveal the evolution of translation strategies. It can be approached from the perspectives of library and information sciences and archive studies to elucidate the value, place and function of translation archives within the development and organisation of libraries and collections, as well as the acquisition, documentation, cataloguing and  communication practices that affect translators’ archives and their use by the public,
researchers or translators themselves—in short, how records of translation and users interact to make meaning.

Researchers of other disciplines are invited, furthermore, to consider how recognising the presence and dynamics of translation may shift their own relationship to the archive. Can translation studies offer other fields with tools to interrogate their historical or theoretical understanding of the archive? Can it challenge existing attitudes to translation within archival spaces? What can a translational turn offer studies of the archive in fields beyond translation studies? Articles for this special issue may therefore address one or more of the following questions:

  • What is a ‘translation archive’ and how are translation archives formed? Why do the materials of certain literary translators survive while others are lost or forgotten? What are the epistemological and ontological particularities of different kinds of translation archives?
  • What methodologies are available to researchers of translation archives and what can translation researchers learn from cognate disciplines that study and theorise archives? How do archival approaches enrich translation analysis, and what are their limits or limitations? What criteria should be used when evaluating the claims of archival research? What can knowledge of translation dynamics and translation studies offer archival studies?
  • What is the importance of informal archives produced by online networks, community groups, fans, volunteers? What are the challenges for researchers approaching archives found outside of libraries and institutional settings? What challenges does the proliferation of personal computers, translation technologies,
    translation memories and other digital media pose for archival approaches to translation studies

Abstracts of no more than 600 words to be submitted by 1st of May 2019

Submission of completed articles in English, French or Spanish by 1st of December 2019

Please send an abstract with short biographical note to  translationarchives.meta@gmail.com

Newsletters

This is a periodic reminder about newsletters as a publishing option. I encourage writing for newsletters because there’s usually a quicker turnaround and they are always looking for content. But mostly, because it’s a great way to start writing. It can be overwhelming to think about starting with a scholarly article, so writing short pieces is good practice while getting another line on your resume. Plus, they generally don’t require research and instead focus more on current project and activities.

And a quick note about two new newsletters, the Appalachian Curator and the BAS Quarterly (from SAA’s Business Archives Section).

As much as I’d like to, I can’t post every call or new newsletter, because there’s too many (which is great!). So take a look at the list of newsletters and find one that works for you!

Call for Nominations: Lyman H. Butterfield Award 2019

Since 1985, the Lyman H. Butterfield Award has been presented annually to an individual, editorial project, or institution for notable contributions in the areas of documentary publication, teaching, and service. The award is granted in memoriam of Lyman Henry Butterfield, whose editing career included contributions to The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, the editing of the Adams Family Papers, and publishing The Letters of Benjamin Rush.

For a list of previous recipients see  https://www.documentaryediting.org/wordpress/?page_id=14

Nominations should be made by email. Supporting letters from members of the Association are encouraged. All materials should reach the committee chair by 15 May 2019, sent by e-mail to:

Sue Perdue
ssh8a@virginia.edu

Butterfield Award Committee

Sue Perdue, Chair
Tenisha Armstrong
Mark Cheatham
Elaine Pascu
Michael Stevens

CFP: special issue on Information Management and Digital Information

The journal Open Information Science is seeking papers for a special issue on Information Management and Digital Information to be published in December 2019.

  • Deadline for extended abstracts: 31 May 2019
  • Notification of acceptance to authors: 15 June 2019
  • Deadline for full articles: 30 September 2019
  • Publication: December 2019-Spring 2020

Topics might include, but are not restricted to:

  • Historical accounts of the development of information management
  • Systematic reviews of contextualised information management (by industry sector, jurisdiction)
  • Theoretical models of information management (including comparative analyses)
  • Information management issues in “niche” sectors
  • Information management professions and professionals (for example education and training, career paths, de-professionalism)
  • Implications of open science for information management
  • Participatory culture and information management (including marginal practitioners in online communities, crowdsourcing information and data, open public data)
  • Regulatory and ethical issues in information management

Abstracts and Submissions

Please send an extended abstract (maximum 1,500 words) by 31 May 2019 to the guest editor Adrienne Muir, Professor of Information Management, Robert Gordon University (a.muir3@rgu.ac.uk). Submitted abstracts should be in English.  The guest editor will evaluated abstracts and will inform authors of acceptance or rejection by 30 June 2019.

All submitted articles will be subject to peer review. Therefore, the acceptance of an extended abstract does not imply the publication of the final text unless the article has passed the peer review and revisions (if required) have been made to the text.

New Issue: Journal of Western Archives

Articles

Review