CFP: 2018 Issue of Openings: Studies in Book Art

For those institutions that have collections of or related to book arts.

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Openings: Studies in Book Art is an open-access, online journal published annually by the College Book Art Association (CBAA). As a double-blind peer-reviewed journal, Openings is dedicated to scholarship on the book as medium, construct, work of art, and, more generally, the arts of the book.

Openings seeks submissions on any relevant topic for its 2018 issue. We welcome articles (suggested length of 4,000-8,000 words) that span the full spectrum of aesthetic, semiotic, historical, political, pedagogical, or other approaches to book art. Contributions from diverse perspectives are encouraged as are interdisciplinary and international explorations of the relationship of book art to the broader art world or other related fields.

We also seek proposals for academic book reviews (750-1,250 words) of recently published criticism on book arts, media studies, or craft and artistic practices. Reviews of artist books or a group or genre of artist books may also be considered. Proposals are not peer reviewed but individually considered by the Editors. Proposals (250 words max.) for book reviews should include the name of the book and demonstrate how the book relates to the themes and audiences of Openings.

Submission and formatting requirements, along with further information about Openings, are linked from the homepage: http://journals.sfu.ca/cbaa/index.php/jcbaa. For any questions not addressed by the website, contact the Editor at journal@collegebookart.org. Please note that membership in CBAA is not required to contribute to Openings; however, submissions that do not meet our requirements or fall outside the scope of the journal will not be considered.

Manuscripts formatted according to the Submission Preparation Checklist are due by June 15, 2018. Please consult the Author Guidelines for details: http://journals.sfu.ca/cbaa/index.php/jcbaa/about/submissions#authorGuidelines.

Molly E. Dotson | Editor
Openings: Studies in Book Art
College Book Art Association (CBAA)

CFP: Archives and Records Special Issue, Archives and Education: New Pedagogies and Practice

This special issue of Archives and Records seeks to explore innovative pedagogical approaches to engagement with archival collections at higher education institutions. Of particular interest are submissions that explicate change through pedagogical practice in both institutional strategy and the engaged population. The issue aims to facilitate a dialogue between researchers, practitioners, archivists, curators, users, educators and scholars and to address questions such as the following:

  • What are the most pressing pedagogical demands being placed on archival collections at higher education institutions and how has this impacted on short, medium and long term engagement strategies?
  • How have archival teams attempted to engage with their target demographics and what successes have been achieved in the attraction of new audiences?
  • How has pedagogical design been integrated into the development of existing and/or new engagement strategies?
  • What are the technological challenges associated with such pedagogical engagement and how has fusion of traditional archival practice with pedagogical design enhanced the learning experience for all involved?
  • How have archivist/teachers developed and embedded critical thinking and archival literacy skills into key partnerships for new impacts in teaching and learning?
  • How have academic archive repositories expanded their user base into non-traditional user groups?
  • How have material culture and digital pedagogies combined within the learning space?
  • What has been the impact of the application of learning theory in practice on the archival teams?
  • How can archival teams begin to think about supporting students across a wide variety of disciplines through pedagogical design and practice?
  • What are the challenges that archival teams are facing in the future and how can relationships with educational/designers help to develop programmes that respond to the needs of the student population with a measurable impact?

Academic libraries are being refocused and repositioned within the traditional infrastructure of higher education and learning. Library and archive repositories are the engine room of such higher education institutions, fibrously connected to the objectives of impactful and innovative learning, teaching and research. Such archive resources support and inspire students in response to a wide variety of demands. Increasing pressure on academic libraries and archival collections in particular, to demonstrate impact, is prompting institutions to evaluate established practices, respond to demand and to plan for the future.

However, in the last thirty years these demands have changed along with a rapid, although not in parallel, evolution of technology, provoking debate amongst this community around how to pedagogically support engagement with collections with demonstrable output. New developments in pedagogical design for student engagement also predominate, responding to the need for the development of 21st century skills that students require to make a successful transition into employment. The digital archive is becoming ever-more integrated into the digital classroom – but what are the implications for this as regards learning through and with tangible objects and the physical record? The role of ‘archivist-as-teacher’ and mediator of the educational experience is taking greater prominence. The reading-room becomes an extension of the lecture theatre.

Current discourse and evidence places high prominence on transferable graduate attributes – those who can learn and work co-dependently as well as independently. Society today, owing to recent global economic and political changes, maintains a cautious position and distrust towards information and data. Documented evidence and testimony has become weaponised. The faculties of critical thinking, evaluation, analytical skills and academic/argumentative writing can be learnt directly from creative engagement with learning through encountering archive collections.

Academic libraries underpin such learning experiences and skills development through archive literacies. There is a need, therefore, to develop a better understanding of how the library and archival collections of higher education institutions can meet the expectations placed upon them while concomitantly meeting the expectations of increasingly dynamic pedagogical environments.

We invite papers on any aspect of pedagogical engagement with archival collections. Submissions to this special issue might consider, although are not limited to, the following themes:

  • Archival collections and the educational practitioner
  • The archivist and the 21st century student
  • Archives and material culture in the digital era – learning through encountering
  • Archival collections and technological enhanced learning experiences
  • Pedagogical design for engagement with archival collections
  • 21st century skill development in the archival environment
  • Educational theory in archival practice
  • Managing and facilitating pedagogical engagement with archives
  • The impact of evolving technology on short, medium and long term planning

How to submit your paper

Prospective authors are invited to contact the Guest Editors, in order to discuss proposed articles for this special issue of Archives and Records which will be published in Spring 2020.

Timelines:

The deadline for expressions of interest is 31 November 2018. All submissions will be double blind peer-reviewed and should be presented in line with the Archives and Records Instructions for Authors.

The final deadline for article submissions is 30 June 2019.

Editorial information

 

New Articles: Journal of Contemporary Archival Studies

Volume 5, 2018

Articles
Nineteenth-Century Depictions of Disabilities and Modern Metadata: A Consideration of Material in the P. T. Barnum Digital Collection
Meghan R. Rinn

Exploring the American Archivist: Corpus analysis tools and the professional literature
J. Gordon Daines III, Cory L. Nimer, and Jacob R. Lee

Moving Toward a Reparative Archive: A Roadmap for a Holistic Approach to Disrupting Homogenous Histories in Academic Repositories and Creating Inclusive Spaces for Marginalized Voices
Lae’l Hughes-Watkins

Book Reviews
Review of Queer Library Alliance: Global Reflections and Imaginings
Matthew P. Messbarger

Review of Curators: Behind the Scenes of Natural History Museums
Danielle Castronovo

Case Study
Adapting an Analog Records Management System for the Ingest and Accession of Permanent Electronic Records
Brandy Tunmire, Amy Dinkins, Mary K. Coker, Shelly J. Croteau, and John Korasick

Work in Progress
Researcher Access to Born-Digital Collections: an Exploratory Study
Julia Y. Kim

New Issue: Information & Culture

Volume 53, Number 2 (April/May 2018)
(subscription)

“Crises” in Scholarly Communications?: Maturity and Transfer of the Journal of Library History to the University of Texas, 1968–1976
by Maria Gonzalez and Patricia Galloway

“Save the Cross Campus”: Library Planning and Protests at Yale, 1968–1969
by Geoffrey Robert Little

Media Prophylaxis: Night Modes and the Politics of Preventing Harm
by Dylan Mulvin

Rethinking the Call for a US National Data Center in the 1960s: Privacy, Social Science Research, and Data Fragmentation Viewed from the Perspective of Contemporary Archival Theory
by Christopher Loughnane, and William Aspray

Book Reviews, Summer 2018

Read our latest book review of: The Intellectual Properties of Learning, by John Willinsky, reviewed by Jesse Erickson.

CFP: Censorship Stories from the Frontline (ALA Publication)

This call doesn’t specifically mention archives, but there’s definite potential.

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You are invited to participate in a new book that will be published by the American Library Association.  The book is a collection of stories from and about librarians who have experienced challenges to library material and/or challenges to intellectual freedom.  The book has the current working title:  Censorship Stories from the Frontline.

The book is an anthology of stories from all library types.  Stories will address examples of censorship challenges related to (but not limited to): religious intolerance, prisoner rights,  Black Lives Matter, anti-immigrant sentiment, international challenges, politics, working with culturally sensitive material, weeding as a form of censorship, self-censorship, displays, intellectual freedom, disinvited speakers, trigger warnings, Me Too, meeting room uses, or any other censorship topic you have experienced in a library or related to library material and/or programming.

The deadline for submissions is September 30, 2018

For more information about this project, to join the mailing list, and to follow the book’s progress visit: www.intellectualfreedombook.com

Essay Guidelines

Essays should be no more than 2500 words in length, and should provide details of a full experience, from initial contact through ultimate resolution. Essays can be a first person narrative or a case study description. I am also seeking descriptions of interactions that may not have ended in a formal challenge or request for reconsideration. These anecdotes should reflect the concerns of either the patron or the librarian or both.

Tips on writing: Explain the situation and how you were involved.  What were some of the most interesting and/or difficult parts of the situation?  How was the issue resolved?   What resources did you draw upon (don’t list resources; tell us about the resources and why they were helpful)? Had you received any training on handling challenges prior to the situation you describe? Have you received any since? Did your library have a procedure in place? If not, does it have one now? What did you learn from the experience?  What advice would you give to someone in a similar situation?

Writers should include the facts of the challenge.  If this is information is based on a personal experience, please share your thoughts and feelings about the confrontation, dealing with administrators, and dealing with the public.

Email submissions to:  intellectualfreedombook@gmail.com

Your submissions should be submitted with the following information:

  1. Title your essay.
  2. Include a 100 word biographical statement.

Your submissions should follow these formatting rules:

  1. Text should be attached as a .doc
  2.  Your Name should be the document label (example JaneSmith.doc)
  3. If you have questions about style, please consult The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, as your general guide to punctuation, capitalization, quotation, abbreviation, source citation, use of italic, etc.

Submitting an essay does not guarantee publication.  If you have questions about your essay and/or topic, please contact me at:  intellectualfreedombook@gmail.com

Contributors will be asked to sign a writer agreement before publication.

Deadline for submissions: September 30, 2018

Interviews

If you would prefer to be interviewed about your experience, send me an email with a description of the experience.  Please provide links and/or attachments to any material that will provide additional background on the situation.

Please distribute this announcement widely and forward it to librarians you believe might have a story to tell.

I look forward to hearing from you!

Val Nye

intellectualfreedombook@gmail.com

CFP: Genealogy special issue “Decolonizing Ways of Knowing: Heritage, Living Communities, and Indigenous Built Environments”

This special issue of Genealogy invites essays on the topic, “Decolonizing Ways of Knowing: Heritage, Living Communities, and Indigenous Built Environments.” Manuscripts may focus on all aspects of heritage, heritage preservation, and traditions of knowing and engaging the past in the present. The “State of the World’s Minorities and Indigenous Peoples 2016” report, published by the Minority Rights Group International (MRG), emphasized the close interconnections between culture and nature, the relationship between people and places, and that these associations are particularly relevant to indigenous communities. We invite contributions that imagine possibilities and associations that mark our humanity cross-culturally including practices of honoring the dead, worshiping/acknowledging ancestors, tracing kinship/genealogical associations, transmitting local histories and knowledge of place, and creating shared identity through oral history and storytelling. There are, of course, associated tensions. As Michael Brown points out, “Cultural heritage, whether embodied in places or stories, is a shape-shifting, protean thing whose contours may be contested even by those who create it” (Brown 2014: 178). With these tensions in mind, we also invite contributions focusing on the ethics of the uses of heritage, including the preservation of heritage resources as commodities and as markers of cultural identity within indigenous communities.

In “Decolonizing Ways of Knowing,” we seek to investigate critical genealogies of settler colonialism, and ask, “What can genealogy studies learn from other conceptions of family history as well as family history preservation and transmission practices cross-culturally?” We are interested in how cultural groups situated outside of Western paradigms have conceived genealogy, and how these ways of knowing can challenge us to think differently about conceptions of time, create deeper dialogues between the living and the dead, and tend to our connections to place. In Benin and Nigeria, for instance, Egungun festivals call forth the spirits of the ancestors in masquerades where the living are confronted with past lives. In Australia, many indigenous communities have conducted genealogy as part land rights claims, but their claims are also directly related to their custodianship of sacred sites that are part of the Dreaming—a time outside of time—that informs cosmology and kinship. Traditionally, the names and pictures of the dead, precious to other cultures, may not be spoken of or viewed. Many documentaries now begin with a warning: “This book may contain names and images of Aboriginal people now deceased.”

For this special issue we invite contributions that showcase the diverse ways that information, knowledge and stories are shared between generations (i.e., practice and performance); examine issues of positionality with respect to knowledge production (reflexivity); and critique relations or systems of power (critical theory/embodied knowledge). At its core, the contributions will contribute to the process of decolonization:

The divestment of foreign occupying powers from Indigenous homelands, modes of government, ways of caring for the people and living landscapes, and especially ways of thinking. For non-Indigenous individuals, decolonization work means stepping back from normative expectations… [Duarte & Belarde-Lewis 2015: 678-679]

We hope to attract a broad audience both within and outside academic institutions and encourages dialogue in multiple forms. We seek to broaden the framework for genealogy studies and welcome your creative works including scholarly research papers, reports, interviews, field notes, visual productions, poetry, prose, drawings, and descriptions of community engagement, rituals, and heritage preservations activities. We encourage submissions that address topics including, but not limited to the following:

Critical genealogies that decolonize knowledge production
Critical genealogies of settler colonialism
Cross-cultural family history-making practices
Totem identities and knowledge transfer
Ancestral worship—performance and practice in public and private settings
Critical investigations into the construction of local histories
Collaborative cultural heritage preservation with living communities
Multi-media memory work
Intergenerational communication and knowledge transfer
Critical pedagogies of place that connect global processes to local histories.
Ethics of heritage preservation and cultural appropriation
Thank-you! We look forward to receiving your works on this topic.

Dr. Antoinette Jackson
Ms. Rachel Breunlin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genealogy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords
Critical family history
radical humanism and memory work
decolonizing knowledge
ancestral worship
clans and totem associations
cultural heritage ethics

NOTE TO CONTRIBUTORS

For the instruction for the authors, please visit the journal website: http://www.mdpi.com/journal/genealogy/instructions

When your paper is ready, please submit it to the editorial office’s online system via the following link (but you need to register on the
MDPI website (http://www.mdpi.com/) first and then use the link):

http://susy.mdpi.com/user/manuscripts/upload?journal=genealogy

Contact Info:
Anyone wants to submit Please contact Guest Editors Dr. Antoinette Jackson (atjackson@usf.edu), Ms. Rachel Breunlin (rsbreunl@uno.edu), or journal managing editor Ms. Allie Shi (genealogy@mdpi.com)

Contact Email: genealogy@mdpi.com
URL: http://www.mdpi.com/journal/genealogy/special_issues/Indigenous

CFP: The Federalist (newsletter)

The Society for History in the Federal Government’s quarterly publication The Federalist seeks early-career professionals working on projects related to the history of the U.S. Federal Government, such as interns, graduate fellows, Presidential Management Fellows, or Pathways Program appointees, who are willing to write about their experiences for an ongoing feature “Internships in Federal History.”

“Internships in Federal History” profiles are typically 300 to 400 word features focusing on your experiences and job responsibilities. The Federalist (http://shfg.wildapricot.org/Federalist-Newsletter) prints “Internships in Federal History” in an effort to raise awareness about the work being done by early-career professionals throughout the field of federal history, and to help individuals who may not have a permanent position to get better-known across the Society for History in the Federal Government community. Email the editor at shfgfederalist@gmail.com with questions or expressions of interest.

Founded in 1979, the Society for History in the Federal Government works to address common concerns, support shared interests, and stimulate discussion across the federal history community. The work of that community takes many forms, including documentary collections, historic preservation and interpretation, institutional histories, museum exhibitions, oral history programs, policy research, records and information management, and reference services. The Society’s membership is similarly diverse, including not only historians but also archaeologists, archivists, consultants, curators, editors, librarians, preservationists, and others engaged in or committed to government history. The Federalist newsletter prints news of recent activities of the Society, its membership, and of important projects and issues affecting federal history programs. The Second Series of the newsletter commenced with the Spring 2004 issue, and is mailed quarterly to Society members.

Contact Info:
Thomas Faith, Editor
The Federalist, Society for History in the Federal Government
Contact Email: shfgfederalist@gmail.com
URL: http://shfg.wildapricot.org/Federalist-Newsletter