CFP: JELIS Issue on Creative Approaches to Teaching and Pedagogy (Journal of Education for Library and Information Science)

Opportunity for archival educators:

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JELIS Special Issue: Volume 62, 2021

JELIS would like to announce the opening for submissions to a Special Issue of the journal (Volume 62, Issue 3, 2021). The Issue theme is as follows:

Creative approaches to teaching and pedagogy

Topics including, but not limited to:

  • Construction of positive learning outcomes
  • Engagement of students in course content
  • Innovative assessment techniques
  • Employment of learning theories
  • Utilization of learning management systems
  • Peer learning strategies
  • Creative syllabus development
  • Advances in assignments for students
  • Employment of tactics from other disciplines
  • Sage and guide
  • Communicative action and teaching
  • Students as teachers
  • The field of creativity studies and its contribution to LIS education and pedagogy

Submissions (see the JELIS guidelines at https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458) may be made in the “Special Issue Papers” section of ScholarOne. Submit only completed papers. The submission is open until September 30, 2020. The submitted papers will be assessed according to the following criteria:

  • Importance of the research question
  • Inclusiveness of the literature review
  • Appropriateness of the methodology
  • Reporting of the findings
  • Quality of the presentation

CFP: Research Methods & Social Justice in LIS: Special issue of IJIDI (International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion)

This call is geared towards librarians, but there is potential for archivists’ voices.

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

A Special Issue of The International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI)

INTERSECTING THEORIES AND METHODS
TO RESEARCH SOCIAL JUSTICE IN LIS SCHOLARSHIP

We invite contributions for a special issue of TheInternational Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI) (http://publish.lib.umd.edu/IJIDI) on the topic of “Intersecting Theories and Methods to Research Social Justice in LIS Scholarship.” We welcome full research papers that make a novel contribution to library and information science (LIS) scholarship, whether empirical, methodological, theory-based, pedagogical, and/or practical in nature. We also ask for Expressions of Interest contributions for a special section on notes-from-the-field, LIS student work, works-in-progress, opinion pieces, and professional reports.

The goal of this special issue is to bring together voices of both emerging scholars and established researchers from a wide range of interdisciplinary perspectives and paradigmatic roots that embrace social justice as an intentional and deliberate strategy in LIS scholarship to generate impact via their information-related work. The term “scholarship” is intentionally used to include documentation and analysis through intersecting lens of diverse theories and methods to implement social justice in LIS practice and research, education and teaching, policy development, service design, and program implementation, among other areas. This collection will showcase exemplars of LIS scholarship from across local, regional, national, and international contexts.

Thus, this special issue will provide examples of study that adopt rigorous models, frameworks, theories, methods, and approaches in LIS research to further social justice and inclusion advocacy in the field. In the process, this collection will fill gaps in showcasing intersections of LIS and interdisciplinary theories with traditional and non-traditional methods of research to further social justice principles of fairness, justice, and equality/equity for all people, including those on the margins of society.

Topics and subjects that expound the intersection of LIS theories and methods may include:

  • Implementing social justice within various domains (e.g., agriculture/rural, diversity, economy, education, health, information technology, law, manufacturing and industry, public policy, social welfare, etc.);
  • Addressing social justice issues related to the information creation-organization-management-dissemination-use processes, critical research design of socio-technical systems, or human information behavior of underserved or disenfranchised populations;
  • Examining problematic dimensions associated with information poverty, marginalization, information literacy of diverse patrons, privileged access and use, biased communication behaviors, information “expert” versus information user, and oppressive technologies;
  • Exploring ways in which LIS programs worldwide are seeking to develop and implement systematic approaches to integrate social justice, social equity, inclusion advocacy, critical information literacies and engaged scholarship while partnering with minority and underserved populations to make meaningful changes in LIS curriculum and discourse.

We invite fully developed research papers for the Articles section (original empirical research, conceptual and theoretical papers), as well as shorter submissions for the Special section (notes-from-the-field, LIS student work, works-in-progress, opinion pieces, and professional reports).

Submission Process – Important Dates

This special issue of IJIDI is scheduled for publication in January 2021. The following submission timeline applies:

31 March, 2020: Abstracts and Expressions of interest (name, role and affiliation: extended abstracts of up to 1,000 words for full research papers, and 250-500 words for contributions to the special section). Please email your submissions to: bmehra@ua.edu.

30 April, 2020: Notification of acceptance

1 July, 2020: Full papers due

January 2021: Special issue published
This issue will be guest edited by: Bharat Mehra, Endowed Chair in Social Justice and Professor, University of Alabama, USA (bmehra@ua.edu)

Author Guidelines and Peer Review Process
Please consult IJIDI Author Guidelines and IJIDI Peer Review Process at: https://jps.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/ijidi/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Any questions related to this issue should be addressed to: bmehra@ua.edu

New Journal: Reviews in Digital Humanities

Welcome to Reviews in Digital Humanities

Reviews in Digital Humanities, edited by Dr. Jennifer Guiliano and Dr. Roopika Risam, is the pilot of a peer-reviewed journal and project registry that facilitates scholarly evaluation and dissemination of digital humanities work and its outputs. We accept submissions of projects that blend humanistic and technical inquiry in a broad range of methods, disciplines, scopes, and scales. These include but are not limited to: digital archives, multimedia or multimodal scholarship, digital exhibits, visualizations, digital games, and digital tools. We particularly encourage submission of digital scholarship in critical ethnic, African diaspora, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian American, and postcolonial studies. Submit your work or contact the editors at reviewsindigitalhumanities@gmail.com.

Call for Proposals: A special issue of Across the Disciplines, Spring 2021 Unsettling Archival Research Across the Disciplines: Engaging Critical, Communal, and Digital Archives

This CFP was sent to me via the Suggest a Topic form I have. I always welcome notices of calls or other publication news!

Call for Proposals: A special issue of Across the Disciplines, Spring 2021 Unsettling Archival Research Across the Disciplines: Engaging Critical, Communal, and Digital Archives

Guest editors: Gesa Kirsch, Caitlin Burns, and Dakoda P. Smith, University of Louisville

This special issue of Across the Disciplines invites scholars to explore what it means to unsettle archival research across the disciplines. Efforts have long been underway to decolonize archival work and archival holdings, to repatriate artifacts, to change derogatory terms in finding aids, to consult with community members about appropriate protection of sacred artifacts, and to heal and reconcile in the wake of wounded/wounding histories (Till; Brasher et al.). Much work has attended to unsettling and wrestling with archives. From one perspective, settler archives are a storehouse for the West’s fictions and myths and a premier site of production for colonial difference, demanding a recovery of absences and silences (García). Yet, despite these important interventions, institutional archives with colonial roots continue to grow, collecting artifacts outside of the communities to which they belong; university archives continue to occupy Native American lands; and governments and corporations surveil our behavior and organize our personal data into digital archives, often with harmful consequences. Such institutions often remain wound(ed/ing) spaces and places.

This special issue of ATD welcomes both critiques of archiving as a set of institutional practices, ideologies, and conventions, and new tactics of critical, communal, and digital archiving within and against those systems of power. We invite scholars to highlight critical, communal, and digital approaches to archival work, to consider how radical political approaches might support them, to reflect on how to counteract and resist racist, colonial histories, and to explore alternatives, perhaps through decolonial, engaged, reciprocal, or collaborative archival practices. We encourage scholars to consider multimodal and digital technologies (Enoch & Bessette), Indigenous methodologies (Cushman, Powell, Tuhiwai Smith, Wilson), decolonial theories (García & Baca; Ruiz & Sánchez), feminist approaches (Enoch, Gaillet, Ramírez, Royster and Kirsch), antiracist efforts (Archives for Black Lives in Philadelphia), queer and trans practices (Bessette, Rawson), disability studies (Brilmyer, Dolmage, McRuer, White), and other perspectives for reconsidering archival research.

Critical, communal, and digital archives often respond to a political moment, to social and cultural conditions, and to the needs of a community by reclaiming and/or retooling certain archival practices, sometimes rewriting archival conventions altogether. For example, marginalized communities and groups do not collect for the sake of collection. They often collect with the survival of their future generations in mind and to pass down their histories. This special issue invites contributions that shed light on how tactical archival practices can decenter, reshape, unsettle and rewrite traditional archival methodologies.

We invite scholars from across the disciplines, including the arts, humanities and social sciences, to submit a contribution in any of the following formats:

1. full-length essays (6,000 – 8,000 words) that unsettle archival research across the disciplines, including methodological interventions, theoretical approaches, praxis in critical, communal, and digital archival building, ethical explorations, community-engaged projects, critical reflections on affect and the consequences of archival research, and more.

2. multimodal projects that explore the affordances of a variety of digital media platforms for the purpose of critical, communal, and digital archiving, as well as projects that attend to the importance of materiality, ephemera, and the artifactual (Pahl & Rowsell; Wysocki & Sheridan).

3. shorter essays (2,500-3,000 words) that might interrogate a key term, offer a critical case study, examine a communal collection, recover a neglected site, repurpose a digital archive, or share a pedagogical application. We have designed the shorter essays to make it possible for graduate students, adjunct faculty, activists, emerging, contingent, underrepresented scholars, and other rebel voices to contribute to this special issue.

Contributors to this special issue may wish to consider the following questions:

  • How might we unsettle institutional archives, given that place-based archives are often housed in institutions such as university and community libraries, historical societies, museums, medical schools, national monuments, national archives and special collections, and research centers? How might we re-envision common features such as curated materials, organized collections, finding aids, and procedures for handling materials to avoid re-inscribing colonial, racist, and sexist perspectives (Archivists Against History Repeating Itself)?
  • How might we create, curate, and work with ephemeral archives, counter-archives, community-engaged and community-generated archives, archives-in-the-making, virtual or digital archives, rebel archives, impromptu archives? What are their affordances and limitations?
  • What does it mean to collect and curate artifacts? Who decides what’s worth collecting, and who is left out of the conversation? Is it possible to both collect and contextualize? How might we write histories of gaps, absences, and missing voices?
  • What new tactics emerge in critical, communal, and digital archiving within and against systems of power? How do we reassess our digital archival practices, in particular, in light of recent concerns about access, digital privacy, surveillance, and data collection (Beck)?
  • How can archives assist in delinking (García & Baca) and decolonial praxis projects (García)? Can archives undermine the logic of the colonial imaginary by helping us get to the locally situated practices that decoloniality calls for?
  • How do archival professionals engage with troubling, haunting, and problematic collections? What are best practices and challenges today for unsettling archival research? How do archives and archivists approach issues of coloniality?
  • How might we address the affective dimensions and emotional labor of archival research (Powell)? How might we honor “reciprocity, respect, and relational accountability” (Wilson), collaborate with the non-living, engage with the past, present, and future?
  • How do we address questions of labor—the time, resources, space, and travel often required to engage in archival research? What are the consequences of such constraints for graduate students, adjunct faculty, activists, emerging, contingent, underrepresented scholars who may be particularly vulnerable and underfunded?

All references in this CFP are available upon request.

Proposals due: April 15, 2020
Notification of Acceptance: May 15, 2020
Manuscripts Due: August 1, 2020
Editorial Feedback: October 1, 2020
Final Manuscripts Due: January 1, 2021
Publication: Spring 2021

Proposal Format: Please submit a 500-word proposal explaining your topic, the research and theoretical base on which you will draw, and your plans for the structure of your article, following the general guidelines for ATD at http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/submissions. Send your proposal electronically (in MS Word format) to Gesa Kirsch at gesa.kirsch@gmail.com and also to ATD editor Michael Cripps at mcripps@une.edu. Please provide full contact information with your submission.

New Journal: Journal of Library Outreach and Engagement

The inaugural call for papers is not yet out, but there is an announcement about a new open access journal and archives is included in the type of content.

Journal of Library Outreach and Engagement

Focus and Scope

The mission of the Journal of Library Outreach & Engagement (JLOE) is to serve as the premier peer-reviewed, open access interdisciplinary journal to advance library outreach and engagement. JLOE provides a platform to disseminate original research that examines public and community engagement initiatives and stimulates a forum to discuss the methodological and epistemological issues that inform, or emerge from, such projects and programs.

Frequency and Schedule of Publication

We will publish two issues per year, one fall and one spring issue. Each issue will contain a letter from the editor(s), a minimum of four scholarly articles, and optionally a handful of “Idea Lab” and “Notes from the Field” columns, and/or book reviews.

Types of Content Included

We welcome articles or editorials that present original research, case studies, or comparable material that advance library outreach and engagement discussions. Authors and their submissions represent libraries of all types, including academic, public, school, and special libraries and archives.

Scholarly Review

Scholarly submissions will undergo a double-blind peer review process.

Open Access and Copyright Policies

The Editors and Editorial Board of JLOE strongly encourages authors to publish the Work under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license (CC BY 4.0) that allows others to distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon the Work, even commercially, as long as they credit the Author for the original creation. The Author may however choose to have the Work distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license (CC BY-NC 4.0).

Target Audience

Library workers at all administrative levels from all types of libraries who have an interest in outreach and engagement, and researchers from the field of library and information science.

CFP: Libraries: Culture, History, and Society

CFP: Libraries: Culture, History, and Society

Libraries: Culture, History, and Society (LCHS) is now accepting submissions for volume 4, number 2, to be published Fall 2020, and for subsequent issues to be published semiannually. A peer-reviewed publication of the Library History Round Table of the American Library Association and the Penn State University Press, LCHS is available in print and online via JSTOR and Project Muse.

The only journal in the United States devoted to library history, LCHS positions library history as its own field of scholarship, while bringing together scholars from many disciplines to examine the history of libraries as institutions, collections, and services, as well as the experiences of library employees and users. There are no limits of time period or geography, and libraries of every type are included (private, public, corporate, academic libraries, and special collections). In addition to Library Science, the journal welcomes contributors from History, English, Literary Studies, Sociology, Gender/Women’s Studies, Race/Ethnic Studies, Political Science, Architecture, and other disciplines.

Submissions for volume 4, issue 2, are due February 28th, 2020, and the deadline for volume 5, issue 1 will be in late August. Manuscripts must be submitted electronically through LCHS’s Editorial Manager system athttps://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS . They must also conform to the instructions for authors at https://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS/account/LCHS%20Author%20Submission%20Guidelines.pdf. New scholars, and authors whose work is in the “idea” stage, are welcomed to contact the editors if they would like guidance prior to submission.

For further questions, please contact the editors:
Bernadette Lear, BAL19@psu.edu
Eric Novotny, ECN1@psu.edu

Contact Info:

Bernadette A. Lear, co-editor, Libraries: Culture, History, and Society

BAL19@psu.edu

(717) 948-6360

Penn State Harrisburg Library

351 Olmsted Dr.

Middletown, PA  17057

Contact Email:
URL:http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html

CFP: Call for Chapter Proposals on Data Literacy

Dear colleagues,

Do you ever help students or faculty with data? Does that work involve helping them to understand:

  • How to find and interpret data?
  • How to be a critical consumer of data?
  • How to be an ethical producer of data?
  • What it means to decolonize data?
  • Why it’s important to document and share research data?
  • Any other form of data literacy?

Then you are invited and encouraged to submit chapter proposals for an upcoming book to be published by ALA Editions, tentatively titled Teaching Critical Thinking with Numbers: Data Literacy and the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Each chapter should be between 4,000 and 6,000 words, and should include a discussion of the ways in which you and/or your colleagues and institution are incorporating data literacy into your work. Possible topics for these case studies could include, but are not limited to, methods for incorporating data literacy into information literacy instruction, experiences promoting data literacy in digital scholarship projects, or strategies for getting community buy-in for data literacy across your institution. If you have any questions about a topic you are considering, you are encouraged to reach out to Julia Bauder (bauderj@grinnell.edu) to discuss it before submitting a full proposal.

To submit a proposal, please e-mail the following to bauderj@grinnell.edu by February 3, 2020:

  • An approximately 400-word summary of the proposed chapter.
  • For each author:
    • Name, institution, and current title.
    • A list of previous publications.
    • If no previous publications, please include or link to a writing sample.

Timeline:

February 3, 2020: Chapter proposals due.
February 21, 2020: Authors notified of acceptance of chapter proposals.
July 1, 2020: Chapter drafts due.
August 14, 2020: Chapter drafts returned to authors for revisions.
October 17, 2020: Chapter revisions due.

Thank you for considering submitting a proposal. Please, if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to me.

Julia Bauder, editor, Teaching Critical Thinking with Numbers: Data Literacy and the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education