CFP: Catholic Library World (ongoing basis)

Though this call does not specifically mention archives, it is an opportunity for theological/religious archives to publish.

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Submissions are being accepted on an ongoing basis for upcoming issues of Catholic Library World.

Catholic Library World is the official journal of the Catholic Library Association. Established in 1929, CLW is a peer reviewed association journal. CLW publishes articles focusing on all aspects of librarianship, especially as it relates to Catholic Studies and CatholicismCLW articles are intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various types of libraries, including, but not limited to academic, public, theological, parish and church libraries, and school libraries.

The preferred method for submitting manuscripts is as a word-processed attachment in e-mail. Author’s full name, affiliation, and e-mail address must accompany any manuscript submission.

Articles should provide something new to the existing literature. The word count should be 3500- 5000 words and should adhere to The Chicago Manual of Style (humanities is preferred). The style should be accessible and well-documented.

For more information, visit: https://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications

Send submissions and queries to: Sigrid Kelsey, General Editor, sigridkelsey@gmail.com

Archives Themed Issue: Anglia Journal of English Philology

Anglia, Volume 138 (2020): Issue 3 (Sep 2020)
(subscription)

Special Issue: Archives

Articles

Daniel Stein
Whats in an Archive? Cursory Observations and Serendipitous Reflections

David Kerler
Archive Fever and British Romanticism: Blake, Byron, and Keats

Tim Sommer
Between Aura and Access: Artefactuality, Institutionality, and the Allure of the Archival

Alexander Starre
The Document as Epistemic Object: Notes on Archival Knowledge Cultures

Katrin Horn
Of Gaps and Gossip: Intimacy in the Archive

Michael A. Chaney
Words, Wares, Names: Dave the Potter as American Archive 

Diana Folsom, Renee Harvey and Kristen T. Oertel
From Parchment to Podcast: The Collaborative Process of Building and Unlocking an Archive

Birgit Däwes
The People Shall Continue: Native American Museums as Archives of Futurity

Ryan Cordell
Speculative Bibliography

Call for Chapter Proposals: Innovation and Experiential Learning in Academic Libraries Meeting the Needs of 21st Century Students

This call does not specifically mention archives, but is potentially related to academic archivists.

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Innovation and Experiential Learning in Academic Libraries
Meeting the Needs of 21st Century Students

Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group
Series: Innovations in Information Literacy
Editors: Sarah Nagle and Elias Tzoc

As technology advances and the skills required for the future workforce continue to change rapidly, academic libraries have begun to expand the definition of information literacy and the type of library services they provide to better prepare students for the constantly-developing world they will face upon graduation. More than teaching the newest technologies, information literacy is expanding to help students develop enduring skills such as critical thinking, creativity, problem solving, communication, teamwork, and more. Innovation and Experiential Learning in Academic Libraries: Meeting the Needs of 21st Century Students addresses the multitude of ways that academic librarians are collaborating with faculty and helping students develop these enduring skills by developing and integrating active and experiential learning approaches into teaching activities.

We plan to organize 8-10 chapters (from a multidisciplinary group of authors) into three main sections:

  • Section I – Innovation and Leadership: in times of unprecedented changes and transformations, library leaders must plan, advocate and implement innovative services that support effective learning and teaching environments for all disciplines.

  • Section II – Examples and Case Studies: academic librarianship is a field of practice where librarians and information professionals are actively involved in creating programs and services that meet the dynamic and ever-changing needs of students and faculty.

  • Section III – Future Literacy Developments: as the world continues to change, because of new technologies or global crisis, the academic library community must also continue to change/create innovative literacy services that will contribute to student success.

Chapters will be 15-20 pages (5,000 – 7,000 words and will include 1-2 figures, tables, or images) each.

Chapter proposal topics may include, but are not limited to:
Section I: Innovation and Leadership

  • Leading teams focused on new/innovative instructional techniques and technologies

  • Campus-library partnerships for innovative initiatives

  • Examples and best practices for working with faculty to incorporate new literacies/experiential learning into curricula

  • Challenging the status quo at your institution

  • Championing innovative efforts

Section II: Examples and Case Studies of Literacy efforts in

  • Digital humanities

  • Data literacy

  • Digital scholarship

  • Active/experiential learning in information literacy

  • Maker/creation literacy

  • Design thinking/entrepreneurial thinking

Section III: Future Literacy Developments

  • Emerging Literacy Services in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

  • Information Literacy and Academic Library Innovation in a Post-COVID World

We seek chapter proposals that can provide crucial guidance for administrators and information literacy practitioners on implementing various new and innovative literacies into their instruction.

Chapter submissions deadline: November 15th, 2020
Decision on chapters proposals: December 15th, 2020
Full chapters deadline: May 15th, 2021

CFP: Libraries: Culture, History, and Society issue on Black women librarians

In Spring 2022, the Library History Round Table will devote volume 6, number 1 of Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, and significant space in LHRT News and Notes, to scholarship, book reviews, and blog posts on Black women librarians. This issue will be guest-edited by Dr. Nicole A. Cooke, the Augusta Baker Endowed Chair and Associate Professor at the University of South Carolina.

Dr. Cooke will accept proposals for scholarly articles and select 4-6 research studies for publication in LCHS. The publication is particularly interested in material on Black women librarians who have not yet been covered adequately by the scholarly or professional literature. Proposals concerning other pathbreaking librarians are also welcomed.

To submit a proposal, please contact Dr. Cooke via this signup form (https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfjEqFwlzqJ77p4ESJ5TLTQxJ84RVV0mogsLCXdKAxEukW_WQ/viewform) by Monday, November 16, 2020.  The full CFP can be found at https://drive.google.com/file/d/1lFFga_cdu1stWAnnF0gk8_KwjYe2MfUd/view?fbclid=IwAR21Le4epLFdHhbfUQ-qD2fnCKtxEeMq2GnXLqZRWoL4e9xluWRzON5NIg4.

New Issue: Feminist Review

Feminist Review, Vol. 125 no 1 (July 2020)
Some content is open access.

Photos on the Mantelpiece
Leo Hermitt

Archival Experiments, Notes and (Dis)orientations
Nydia A. Swaby, Chandra Frank

Experimentations With the Archive: A Roundtable Conversation
La Vaughn Belle, Zayaan Khan, Holly A. Smith, Julietta Singh

Speculative Fabulations: Enter the Archive, or ‘Beneath Yaba’s Garden’
Ama Josephine B. Johnstone

Being Close to, With or Amongst
Onyeka Igwe

‘Listening’ With Gothenburg’s Iron Well: Engaging the Imperial Archive Through Black Feminist Methodologies and Arts-Based Research
Lena Sawyer, Nana Osei-Kofi

Out of Sorts: A Queer Crip in the Archive
Ryan Lee Cartwright

Black Tree Play: Learning From Anti-Lynching Ecologies in The ‘Life and Times’ of an American Called Pauli Murray
Virginia Thomas

Archiving the African Feminist Festival Through Oral Communication and Social Media
Ifeanyi Awachie

June Givanni’s Pan-African Cinema Archive: A Diasporic Feminist Dwelling Space
Aditi Jaganathan, Sarita Malik, June Givanni

Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments: Intimate Histories of Social Upheaval
Eddie Bruce-Jones

Call for proposals for Innovation Column for 2021: Journal of New Librarianship

You are invited to submit a proposal for the Journal of New Librarianship’s On Innovation in Libraries column.

Innovations in a Time of Crisis and Complexity

Rogers (2003) defined innovation as an “idea, practice, or object that is perceived as new by an individual or other unit of adoption” (p. 12). Innovations may take place as social problems gain a position of high priority in response to heightened recognition of problems or needs (Rogers, 2003). As the Journal of New Librarianship completes its transition to OJS at CU Boulder, we are issuing a call for proposals for the column, On Innovation in Libraries. The theme for this cycle of column publications will explore the topic of library innovations in a time of crisis and complexity during which we have seen exacerbation of existing inequalities (Campbell, 2020). We invite you to share what this has looked like in your Library’s praxis.

Completed columns will be 1,500 – 3,000 words. Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit proposals of 200-500 words on or before Monday, September 21, 2020. Authors will be notified by Wednesday, October 21, 2020 regarding the status of their proposals and to discuss a timeline for column submission, editorial review, and publication in early 2021 on our new OJS platform.

Please submit column proposals via this web form. [https://nam04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fokstatelib.qualtrics.com%2Fjfe%2Fform%2FSV_2aVV41UunoLtUu9&data=02|01|cristina.colquhoun%40okstate.edu|c99d10c8c5b84140f33508d8359044df|2a69c91de8494e34a230cdf8b27e1964|0|0|637318241029274081&sdata=HWtradEN2PxmdHO4WQBz5vnTaGF%2Fcl4mZQnZY3uplhM%3D&reserved=0) ]

Campbell, L. (July 8, 2020). Sustaining an ethic of care. Open World. https://lornamcampbell.org/higher-education/sustaining-care/.

CFP: Libraries: Culture, History, and Society

Type: Call for Papers
Date: August 27, 2020
Location: United States
Subject Fields: Graduate Studies, Humanities, Political History / Studies, Social History / Studies, Women’s & Gender History / Studies

Libraries: Culture, History, and Society (LCHS) is now accepting submissions for volume 5, number 1, to be published Spring 2021, and for subsequent issues to be published semiannually. A peer-reviewed publication of the Library History Round Table of the American Library Association and the Penn State University Press, LCHS is available in print and online via JSTOR and Project Muse.

The only journal in the United States devoted to library history, LCHS positions library history as its own field of scholarship, while bringing together scholars from many disciplines to examine the history of libraries as institutions, collections, and services, as well as the experiences of library employees and users. There are no limits of time period or geography, and libraries of every type are included (private, public, corporate, academic, and school libraries, and special collections). In addition to Library Science, the journal welcomes contributors from History, English, Literary Studies, Education, Sociology, Gender/Women’s Studies, Race/Ethnic Studies, Political Science, Architecture, and other disciplines.

Submissions for volume 5, issue 1, are due August 28th, 2020, and the deadline for volume 5, issue 2 will be in late February. Manuscripts must be submitted electronically through LCHS’s Editorial Manager system at https://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS . They must also conform to the instructions for authors at https://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS/account/LCHS%20Author%20Submission%20Guidelines.pdf. New scholars, and authors whose work is in the “idea” stage, are welcomed to contact the editors if they would like guidance prior to submission.

For further questions, please contact the editors:
Bernadette Lear, BAL19@psu.edu
Eric Novotny, ECN1@psu.edu

Contact Info:
Bernadette A. Lear
Co-Editor, LCHS
BAL19@psu.edu

Contact Email:
bal19@psu.edu

URL: http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html

 

New Issue: Judaica Librarianship

The newest issue of Judaica Librarianship includes several articles about archives.

Judaica Librarianship, Vol. 21 (2020)
(open access)

Editorial
Vol. 21 Editor’s Note
Rachel Leket-Mor

Essays and Research

The Victor Perera Papers: The Archive of a Twentieth Century Sephardic-American Writer
Gabriel Mordoch

The Importance of Being Discovered: The Werner Von Boltenstern Shanghai Photograph and Negative Collection
Melanie Hubbard

The UCLA Sephardic Archive Initiative: Finding the Keys to an Untold History
Max Modiano Daniel

Primary Sources in the College Classroom: The Beck Archives at the University of Denver Libraries
Jeanne Abrams

The Sydney Taylor Book Award at Fifty: Trends in Canonized Jewish Children’s Literature (1968–2020)
Rachel Leket-Mor, Fred Isaac

The Cultural Doings and Undoings of the Sydney Taylor Book Award
Stacy M. Collins

“Love Your Neighbor”: An AJL Project to Combat Antisemitism
Heidi Rabinowitz, Kathleen Bloomfield

Columns

JS/DH: Primary Sources and Open Data
Michelle Chesner

Scatter of the Literature
June 2017–February 2020
Haim A. Gottschalk

CFP: Public Services Quarterly

PUBLIC SERVICES QUARTERLY is always looking for quality submissions.

Public Services Quarterly covers a broad spectrum of public service issues in academic libraries, presenting practical strategies for implementing new initiatives and research-based insights into effective practices. The journal publishes research-based and theoretical articles as well as case studies that advance the understanding of public services, including reference and research assistance, information literacy instruction, access and delivery services, and other services to patrons. Articles may examine creative ways to use technology to assist students and faculty. Practice-based articles are thoroughly grounded in the literature and situate the work done in one library into the larger context.

Manuscript Submissions:  This journal uses ScholarOne Manuscripts to manage submissions and the peer-review process.
To view an online sample copy, go to: www.tandfonline.com/WPSQ

For more information, feel free to contact the editor, editorial board, or columns editors, listed here.

Sian Brannon <Sian.Brannon@unt.edu>

CFP: Library Diversity and Residency Studies

Type: Journal
Date: September 15, 2020
Location: United States
Subject Fields: Library and Information Science, Archival Science
Library Diversity and Residency Studies: Journal Call for Papers

We are pleased to announce a call for papers for the next issue of Library Diversity and Residency Studies (LDRS), an open access, peer-reviewed journal founded and published by a team of librarians and LIS faculty members. LDRS publishes articles that are engaged in the social justice project of increasing diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in the library profession and in LIS curricula.

Journal URL: https://librarydiversity.institute/ldrs/
Author Guidelines: https://librarydiversity.institute/ldrs/author-guidelines/
Link to submit papers: https://librarydiversity.institute/ldrs/submit/

Deadline for submissions to the next issue is: September 15, 2020

LDRS is committed to providing a platform for the publication of work that might otherwise be marginalized from dominant discourses. We welcome work from established authors in the field, and also encourage submissions from new authors. We will prioritize submissions from minoritized voices, including submissions that represent diverse perspectives. We are committed to working with authors during the submission and review process.

We publish high quality, peer-reviewed articles in a range of formats, with a focus on DEI issues and residency programs. While we are open to suggestions for new article types and formats, We expect proposals to include unique and substantial new content from the author and are open to suggestions for new article types and formats. Examples of material we would publish include:

  • articles about particular DEI programs in libraries, with an objective assessment of strengths and weaknesses, the specific impacts of these programs, and strategies by which these programs could be replicated elsewhere;
  • rigorous and original research that includes discussion of implications and an argument for action that makes a unique, significant contribution to the professional literature;
  • articles arguing for a particular approach, strategy or development in librarianship, with practical examples of how it might be achieved;
  • transformative works with additional explanatory or interpretive content. For example, a transcription of an interview or panel discussion, with a substantial introduction explaining the importance of the subject to librarianship and a discussion; and
  • best practices to aid in the retention of librarians from minoritized populations.

Open Access Policy

LDRS is an open access publication. We believe making works that engage with DEI topics freely accessible will support a greater exchange of knowledge and provide the best possibility for change. There are no Article Processing Charges or any other charges associated with publishing in LDRS.

Works are released under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Attribution-NonCommercial license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0), which provides unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Copyright remains with the authors of articles published in LDRS, with the journal retaining a permanent right to display articles in final accepted form. For further details, refer to the LDRS author guidelines (https://librarydiversity.institute/ldrs/author-guidelines/).