Call for Papers | Special Issue of Notes on “Digital Humanities and Music Pedagogy”

This call does not specifically mention archives, but has potential for archivists who work with music collections.

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We invite submissions to a special issue of Notes entitled “Digital Humanities and Music Pedagogy” that will explore the current state of thought and practice at the intersections of the digital humanities and social sciences, music information, and graduate, undergraduate, and continuing education in music. The goal of this issue is to better understand the influence of digital methodologies on the formation of music researchers. To that end, we aim to explore current cross-disciplinary work where information specialists, technicians, ethnomusicologists and musicologists, theorists, performers, and composers strive in tandem to construct learning environments in which new questions, different interpretive angles, wider contextual frames, and humanizing influences are brought to the fore in musical study.

We encourage the following types of submission:

  • Short, 2,000 to 4,000 word position papers on the ways in which the methods, techniques, and collaborative infrastructures of the digital humanities and social sciences further pedagogical work in music, in and outside of the academy
  • Research articles of up to 10,000 words exploring case studies, best practices, theoretical approaches, and critically examined experiments in digital methods and forms of presentation with students in music and music librarianship

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Explorations of the implications of the digital humanities and social sciences for the current and future study of music
  • The intersections of the human and the digital in music study, including constructions of personal and social identity along the lines of gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, class, disability, religion, nation, and age
  • Examinations of labor equity, power, and precarity in digital humanities/digital musicological pedagogy
  • (Re)examinations of our approaches to music pedagogy and to the digital at moments of global or local crisis, trauma, and uncertainty, including the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Digital humanities and digital social science in the music classroom as an incubator for student-, librarian-, or faculty-led digital projects
  • Challenges and obstacles to the adoption of digital modes of analysis and presentation among music students, scholars, and librarians, within the library or the academy
  • Digital pedagogical approaches that center student research questions and foster the creation of student communities of practice
  • Critical approaches to the curation, analysis, presentation, and preservation of music data and metadata that excavate and make manifest embedded assumptions and biases
  • Pedagogical explorations of models of music data and of music information systems that reveal the seams of their construction and the tensions of part versus whole

Manuscript submissions are due September 18, 2020. Questions and expressions of interest may be sent to the guest editor, Francesca Giannetti, Digital Humanities Librarian at Rutgers University–New Brunswick, at fg162@rutgers.edu. For details on citations, figures, and formatting, please see “Information for Contributors”.

Call for Submissions: Sustainability in Libraries

This call does not specifically mention archives, but directly relates to initiatives that archivists are engaged in.

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Sustainability in Libraries, edited by Rebekkah Smith Aldrich, Monika Antonelli, Adrian Ho, and René Tanner will be published by ALA Editions. The book will offer insights into the important developments on how librarians provide leadership and how libraries serve as models for sustainable practices. The editors are seeking articles from a variety of perspectives on topics related to sustainability-including crisis preparation, response, and recovery-within the library profession.

Objective of the Book:

In 2019, the American Library Association adopted Sustainability as a new core value. This book will provide direction to library personnel and libraries as institutions to position themselves as connectors, conveners, and catalysts for the changes needed. “Sustainability” is not an end point but a mindset, a lens through which operational and outreach decisions can be made. With the climate crisis upon us and its devastating impact on wildlife, oceans, air quality, soil, and the very fabric of life on Earth, we are compelled to find answers and provide direction for our library communities whether they be rural, suburban, metropolitan, schools, or institutions of higher learning. The examples and ideas shared in this edited volume will have far reaching potential and bolster the United Nations’ work on the Sustainable Development Goals, which seek to create a more sustainable future for all.

Suggested Topics:

The book chapters will be divided into three main themes for sustainable action.

Theme #1: Libraries as Inspiration & Catalysts – Content that would fall under this theme include topics and examples related to how libraries may provide leadership and serve as a model for sustainable practices through facility stewardship, innovative service design, and outreach and partnership practices.

Theme #2: Libraries as Conveners & Connectors – Content that would fall under this theme include topics and examples related to how libraries work collaboratively through visionary partnerships to facilitate collective impact work to address existing challenges and opportunities with a focus on community well-being and self-reliance.

Theme #3: Libraries as Contributors to Community Resilience – Content that would fall under this theme includes topics and examples of how libraries contribute to future community resilience. For example, active participation in library-centric or community-based resilience/disaster preparedness, response, and recovery efforts and work that contributes to creating a culture of respect, understanding, and empathy in the library’s service area.

Target Audience:

The intended audience for this book is people working in public, school, academic, special, rural, and urban libraries. In addition, this book will include instructional materials to be used in Library and Information Science programs to educate future library practitioners about Sustainability, the newest Core Value of Librarianship.

Special Considerations:

High quality, large file, professional, black and white images are encouraged to enhance the text. Unless they are public domain or openly licensed for commercial use, a permission release will be required for each image submitted. A model release form will be necessary for any images with recognizable people in them. The person must be a legal adult or have a parent’s permission to use the image.

Submission Guidelines:

The editors welcome submissions from authors who are interested or have experience creating sustainable libraries or working on topics of sustainability in connection with libraries. The editors are open to a variety of submissions including research articles, how-to articles, essays, and interviews. Manuscript submissions should comply with APA Style.

The editors are looking for submissions about sustainability in libraries that emphasize scalable approaches that can be applied to a variety of libraries at different levels. Brief proposals about programs and partnerships that provide inspiration and actionable takeaways are encouraged. Submit a summary of your proposed article (300 words or less) to Sustainability in Libraries.

The development of manuscripts will be done in phases. After comments are returned to authors regarding accepted chapter summary proposals, a chapter outline (500 words or less) will be requested.

Once authors receive acceptance for their chapters they will submit their final manuscripts in .doc or .docx format.  Suggested length is 2,000 to 3,500 words.  Manuscripts should comply with APA style guidelines.

Timeline:

  • Chapter Summary Proposal deadline:  June 15, 2020
  • Notification by editors of proposal acceptance: July 15, 2020
  • Chapter Outlines deadline:  August 17, 2020
  • First Manuscript Drafts deadline: October 1, 2020
  • Additional key dates will be sent to successful proposal writers.

Submit chapter summary proposals to: forms.gle/axqBoa1c9LAa6GQF6

For additional information, please contact:

Adrian Ho, Director of Digital Scholarship, University of Kentucky, hoadriank[at]gmail[dot]com, or

Rene Tanner, Liaison Librarian, Humanities Division, Arizona State University, rene.tanner[at]asu[dot]edu.

Call for Essays: Women and the Art and Science of Collecting: Eighteenth-Century Collecting Beyond Europe

Women and the Art and Science of Collecting: Eighteenth-Century Collecting Beyond Europe
Edited by Dr. Arlene Leis and Dr. Kacie Wills
Abstracts due by 1 July 2020, with case studies due by 31 October 2020 and longer essays due 1 December 2020

We are inviting chapter abstracts for a collection of essays designed for academics, specialists, and enthusiasts interested in the interrelations between art and science in women’s collections and collecting practices beyond Europe in the long 18th century. This volume will follow our forthcoming compendium on the topic entitled, Women and the Art and Science of Collecting in Eighteenth-Century Europe, published by Routledge. This book recovers women’s histories through numerous interdisciplinary discourses pertaining to the subject of collecting, and it examines their interests, methodologies, and practices in relation to cultures of art and science.

In the second volume, we continue this discussion and consider women’s relationships to collecting of European and non-European objects, gathered, exchanged, and displayed within colonies and with indigenous cultures beyond Europe. Responding to ideas about indigenous collecting raised by Nicholas Thomas, Jennifer Newell, Greg Dening, Anne D’Alleva, Adriana Craciun, Mary Terrall, and others, we also aim to consider intercultural exchanges and collections of objects relatively unknown to Europeans. European collecting often traces its roots to biblical mythologies, such as the stories of Adam (naming and owning) and Noah (rescuing and preserving). What are the histories of collecting beyond Europe? And in what ways did women actively participate in or challenge those stories?

We hope to explore a diverse range of theoretical contexts, such as art historical, material culture, feminist, social, performance, gender, colonial, archival, and literary. We welcome essays that take a material culture approach and are particularly keen on research that makes use of new archival resources. We encourage interdisciplinary perspectives and are especially interested in essays that reveal the way in which women’s collections outside of Europe participated in cultures of art and science.

The compendium will consist of around ten essays of 6,000–6,500 words (with footnotes), each with up to four illustrations. In addition to these more traditional essays, we are looking for shorter (circa 1,000 words) case studies on material objects of interest from the period. The subject of women’s collections and art and science is also central to these smaller contributions, and each will include one illustration.

We aim to address the following topics and questions:
• The practice of collecting as cultural construct
• Decolonizing collecting
• What motivated women to collect in places outside of Europe? What were they collecting? How were women’s collections beyond Europe similar or different to their European counterparts?
• Women’s travel, immigration, exploration and the mobility of objects
• Collaborations
• Classification, taxonomies and methodologies of collecting outside of Europe
• Religious collections
• Display
• Collecting for power and status
• Preservation, creation and learning
• The aesthetics of collecting beyond Europe
• Women’s exchanges/interactions with indigenous populations
• Collections formed as a means of making sense of the world

All inquiries should be addressed to Arlene Leis, aleis914@gmail.com or Kacie Wills, kacie.wills@gmail.com
. Essay abstracts of 500 words and 300 word abstracts for smaller case studies are due July 1, 2020 and should be sent along with a short bio to: kacie.wills@gmail.com and aleis914@gmail.com. Finished case studies will be due October 31, 2020, and long essays will be due December 1, 2020.

CFP: Digital Libraries and COVID-19

Special issue call for papers from Digital Library Perspectives

Digital libraries are services that have been developed and enhanced for years, but the recent Covid-19 pandemic has made many users aware of the service for the first time. Especially because of the closure of libraries, during the pandemic, additional efforts have been made to promote Digital Libraries and their services, as clearly visible and active libraries. Moreover, traditional libraries or those without many digital services are having the challenge of keeping their services active for their users virtually during this emergency, and librarians have been engaging in new work practices in order to achieve such objectives from their home offices.

This special issue aims to understand the challenges that the COVID-19 pandemic has posed to digital libraries and users and how they are responding to these challenges:

  • How does the pandemic affect digital libraries and their users?
  • How does the pandemic make digital libraries look different now and in the future?
  • What do you think is the lasting impact of COVID-19 on digital libraries and their users?
  • What are the new digital services and activities that librarians are conducting from their home offices to keep their libraries alive and support their users?
  • What are the responsibilities of professionals now and in the future?

We are interested in receiving papers highlighting the current initiatives and best practices that digital libraries are engaging with, in order to deepen the conversation on how they are responding to this historic challenge.

This special issue aims to be a platform for individuals and institutions to share reflections and experiences, to help us support each other as we collectively adapt and grow stronger from this experience.

Submissions should comply with the journal author guidelines and should be made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer review system.

Important Dates:

Initial submissions due date: May 1st, 2020
Preliminary Feedback notification:  May 15th, 2020
Revised submissions due:  June 1st, 2020
Peer review / editorial decisions due:  June 20th, 2020
Final submissions due:  July 30th, 2020
Expected publication: Fall/Autumn 2020

CFP: JELIS Issue on Creative Approaches to Teaching and Pedagogy (Journal of Education for Library and Information Science)

Opportunity for archival educators:

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JELIS Special Issue: Volume 62, 2021

JELIS would like to announce the opening for submissions to a Special Issue of the journal (Volume 62, Issue 3, 2021). The Issue theme is as follows:

Creative approaches to teaching and pedagogy

Topics including, but not limited to:

  • Construction of positive learning outcomes
  • Engagement of students in course content
  • Innovative assessment techniques
  • Employment of learning theories
  • Utilization of learning management systems
  • Peer learning strategies
  • Creative syllabus development
  • Advances in assignments for students
  • Employment of tactics from other disciplines
  • Sage and guide
  • Communicative action and teaching
  • Students as teachers
  • The field of creativity studies and its contribution to LIS education and pedagogy

Submissions (see the JELIS guidelines at https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458) may be made in the “Special Issue Papers” section of ScholarOne. Submit only completed papers. The submission is open until September 30, 2020. The submitted papers will be assessed according to the following criteria:

  • Importance of the research question
  • Inclusiveness of the literature review
  • Appropriateness of the methodology
  • Reporting of the findings
  • Quality of the presentation

CFP: Research Methods & Social Justice in LIS: Special issue of IJIDI (International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion)

This call is geared towards librarians, but there is potential for archivists’ voices.

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

A Special Issue of The International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI)

INTERSECTING THEORIES AND METHODS
TO RESEARCH SOCIAL JUSTICE IN LIS SCHOLARSHIP

We invite contributions for a special issue of TheInternational Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI) (http://publish.lib.umd.edu/IJIDI) on the topic of “Intersecting Theories and Methods to Research Social Justice in LIS Scholarship.” We welcome full research papers that make a novel contribution to library and information science (LIS) scholarship, whether empirical, methodological, theory-based, pedagogical, and/or practical in nature. We also ask for Expressions of Interest contributions for a special section on notes-from-the-field, LIS student work, works-in-progress, opinion pieces, and professional reports.

The goal of this special issue is to bring together voices of both emerging scholars and established researchers from a wide range of interdisciplinary perspectives and paradigmatic roots that embrace social justice as an intentional and deliberate strategy in LIS scholarship to generate impact via their information-related work. The term “scholarship” is intentionally used to include documentation and analysis through intersecting lens of diverse theories and methods to implement social justice in LIS practice and research, education and teaching, policy development, service design, and program implementation, among other areas. This collection will showcase exemplars of LIS scholarship from across local, regional, national, and international contexts.

Thus, this special issue will provide examples of study that adopt rigorous models, frameworks, theories, methods, and approaches in LIS research to further social justice and inclusion advocacy in the field. In the process, this collection will fill gaps in showcasing intersections of LIS and interdisciplinary theories with traditional and non-traditional methods of research to further social justice principles of fairness, justice, and equality/equity for all people, including those on the margins of society.

Topics and subjects that expound the intersection of LIS theories and methods may include:

  • Implementing social justice within various domains (e.g., agriculture/rural, diversity, economy, education, health, information technology, law, manufacturing and industry, public policy, social welfare, etc.);
  • Addressing social justice issues related to the information creation-organization-management-dissemination-use processes, critical research design of socio-technical systems, or human information behavior of underserved or disenfranchised populations;
  • Examining problematic dimensions associated with information poverty, marginalization, information literacy of diverse patrons, privileged access and use, biased communication behaviors, information “expert” versus information user, and oppressive technologies;
  • Exploring ways in which LIS programs worldwide are seeking to develop and implement systematic approaches to integrate social justice, social equity, inclusion advocacy, critical information literacies and engaged scholarship while partnering with minority and underserved populations to make meaningful changes in LIS curriculum and discourse.

We invite fully developed research papers for the Articles section (original empirical research, conceptual and theoretical papers), as well as shorter submissions for the Special section (notes-from-the-field, LIS student work, works-in-progress, opinion pieces, and professional reports).

Submission Process – Important Dates

This special issue of IJIDI is scheduled for publication in January 2021. The following submission timeline applies:

31 March, 2020: Abstracts and Expressions of interest (name, role and affiliation: extended abstracts of up to 1,000 words for full research papers, and 250-500 words for contributions to the special section). Please email your submissions to: bmehra@ua.edu.

30 April, 2020: Notification of acceptance

1 July, 2020: Full papers due

January 2021: Special issue published
This issue will be guest edited by: Bharat Mehra, Endowed Chair in Social Justice and Professor, University of Alabama, USA (bmehra@ua.edu)

Author Guidelines and Peer Review Process
Please consult IJIDI Author Guidelines and IJIDI Peer Review Process at: https://jps.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/ijidi/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Any questions related to this issue should be addressed to: bmehra@ua.edu

New Journal: Reviews in Digital Humanities

Welcome to Reviews in Digital Humanities

Reviews in Digital Humanities, edited by Dr. Jennifer Guiliano and Dr. Roopika Risam, is the pilot of a peer-reviewed journal and project registry that facilitates scholarly evaluation and dissemination of digital humanities work and its outputs. We accept submissions of projects that blend humanistic and technical inquiry in a broad range of methods, disciplines, scopes, and scales. These include but are not limited to: digital archives, multimedia or multimodal scholarship, digital exhibits, visualizations, digital games, and digital tools. We particularly encourage submission of digital scholarship in critical ethnic, African diaspora, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian American, and postcolonial studies. Submit your work or contact the editors at reviewsindigitalhumanities@gmail.com.