Library Technology: Innovating Technologies, Services, and Practices

This call is not archives-specific, but definitely our technological advancements can contribute to the conversation.

_________________________________

Technology is ubiquitous and ever evolving in academic libraries ranging from the technology integrated in the physical library space to online presences that connect users to library resources. Keeping up with the constant development to library technology services and practices can be a challenge for any library—there could be financial, space, or staffing constraints in addition to other potential detractors. However, there are also ample opportunities to excel in specific areas of library technology in order to better serve our library users in their research and knowledge creation journey. Academic libraries can share their innovative implementation and management of technologies or technology related services and practices. These conversations drive the future of library technology and technology practices. It all starts with a spark of inspiration.

A CALL FOR PROPOSALS

College & Undergraduate Libraries, a peer-reviewed journal published by Taylor & Francis, invites proposals for a special issue focusing on innovative technologies, technology services and practices in academic libraries. Library technology is broadly defined to be inclusive of the various types of technologies academic libraries support. Potential submissions include research studies, case studies, best practices, or position papers involving:

  • Immersive research or programs such as augmented reality or virtual reality
  • Makerspaces or creation studios
  • Enhancing library space with technology
  • Sustainability and library technology
  • Assessing library technology services using UX practices
  • Evaluating library technology department workflows or functionality
  • Securing library technology
  • Privacy and ethics with library technology or library technology services
  • Internet of Things in an academic library
  • Designing academic library websites or technology services
  • Using analytics to improve a library service or online presence
  • Improving access to library resources via discovery services or library management systems
  • Exploring alternative means of authentication or improving current authentication systems
  • Incorporating machine learning or library data projects
  • Adding technology into library instruction or using innovative technology to teach remote learners
  • Teaching technology in an academic library
  • Intentionally designing learning spaces with technology
  • Using Git or other code repositories for library technology management
  • Strategic planning of technology services
  • Accessibility of library technologies
  • Increasing inclusion using technology
  • Innovative or inspiring library technology projects/programs
  • Technology trends outside the library we should be watching

Submissions may address opportunities, challenges, and criticism in any of these areas. Topics not listed in these themes may also be considered.

This special issue is set to be published in June 2020.

Submitting a Proposal

Proposals should include a title, an abstract (500 words maximum), keywords describing the article (6 keywords max), and author(s) contact information.

Please submit article proposals via email to Tabatha Farney (guest editor) at tfarney@uccs.edu by September 30th, 2019. Final manuscripts are due by February 15, 2020.

Feel free to contact me with any questions that you may have,

Tabatha Farney, guest editor

Director of Web Services and Emerging Technologies

Kraemer Family Library

University of Colorado Colorado Springs

tfarney@uccs.edu

CFP: College & Undergraduate Libraries Special Issue on Technology

This call doesn’t specifically mention archives, but definitely relates.

_____________________________________

LIBRARY TECHNOLOGY: INNOVATING TECHNOLOGIES, SERVICES AND PRACTICES

Technology is ubiquitous and ever evolving in academic libraries ranging from the technology integrated in the physical library space to online presences that connect users to library resources. Keeping up with the constant development to library technology services and practices can be a challenge for any library—there could be financial, space, or staffing constraints in addition to other potential detractors. However, there are also ample opportunities to excel in specific areas of library technology in order to better serve our library users in their research and knowledge creation journey. Academic libraries can share their innovative implementation and management of technologies or technology related services and practices. These conversations drive the future of library technology and technology practices. It all starts with a spark of inspiration.

A CALL FOR PROPOSALS

College & Undergraduate Libraries, a peer-reviewed journal published by Taylor & Francis, invites proposals for a special issue focusing on innovative technologies, technology services and practices in academic libraries. Library technology is broadly defined to be inclusive of the various types of technologies academic libraries support. Potential submissions include research studies, case studies, best practices, or position papers involving:

  • Immersive research or programs such as augmented reality or virtual reality
  • Makerspaces or creation studios
  • Enhancing library space with technology
  • Sustainability and library technology
  • Assessing library technology services using UX practices
  • Evaluating library technology department workflows or functionality
  • Securing library technology
  • Privacy and ethics with library technology or library technology services
  • Internet of Things in an academic library
  • Designing academic library websites or technology services
  • Using analytics to improve a library service or online presence
  • Improving access to library resources via discovery services or library management systems
  • Exploring alternative means of authentication or improving current authentication systems
  • Incorporating machine learning or library data projects
  • Adding technology into library instruction or using innovative technology to teach remote learners
  • Teaching technology in an academic library
  • Intentionally designing learning spaces with technology
  • Using Git or other code repositories for library technology management
  • Strategic planning of technology services
  • Accessibility of library technologies
  • Increasing inclusion using technology
  • Innovative or inspiring library technology projects/programs
  • Technology trends outside the library we should be watching

Submissions may address opportunities, challenges, and criticism in any of these areas. Topics not listed in these themes may also be considered.

This special issue is set to be published in June 2020.

Submitting a Proposal

Proposals should include a title, an abstract (500 words maximum), keywords describing the article (6 keywords max), and author(s) contact information.

Please submit article proposals via email to Tabatha Farney (guest editor) at tfarney@uccs.edu by September 30th, 2019. Final manuscripts are due by February 15, 2020.

Feel free to contact me with any questions that you may have,

Tabatha Farney, guest editor
Director of Web Services and Emerging Technologies
Kraemer Family Library
University of Colorado Colorado Springs
tfarney@uccs.edu

Call for Submissions: Education Libraries

This call doesn’t specifically mention archives, but because it’s about education it is an opportunity to share teaching with primary sources or other topics of interest to educators.

__________________________________

The editors of Education Libraries are soliciting submissions for:

  • Articles
  • Case Studies
  • Book Reviews

Education Libraries is an Open Access, double-blind peer-reviewed journal that offers a forum for new and challenging ideas in education, and library and information science. It also explores the effect of new technologies on the library profession and library and information curriculum.

Education Libraries is published by the Education Division of the Special Libraries Association. Its audience consists of education information professionals employed in a variety of venues, including special libraries and information centers, academic libraries, public libraries, and school libraries.

Manuscripts submitted for publication in Education Libraries should present research studies, descriptive narratives, or other thoughtful considerations of topics of interest to the education information professional. Manuscripts focusing on issues relevant to more general concerns either in the field of education or in the field of library and information science are also welcome provided they include a significant component specifically germane to education, libraries, and librarianship.

Submission guidelines

Education Libraries is indexed in ERIC, EBSCOhost’s Education Collection, and Library Literature.

In addition, we are looking for volunteers interested in acting as peer-reviewers, or interesting in supporting the journal in other ways.

Please contact Editor-in chief, Willow Fuchs, at education.libraries@gmail.com if you have any questions.

Willow Fuchs
Editor-in-chief, Education Libraries
University of Iowa Libraries
willow-fuchs@uiowa.edu
319-353-0151

Call for Chapters: Implementing Excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: A Handbook for Academic Libraries

Call for Chapter Proposals
Implementing Excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: A Handbook for Academic Libraries

Chapter proposals are requested for an edited volume titled Implementing Excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: A Handbook for Academic Libraries, to be published by the Association of College and Research Libraries. Head Editors are Brian Lym (Hunter College) and Corliss Lee (University of California, Berkeley), and Co-Editors are Tatiana Bryant (Adelphi University), Jonathan Cain (University of Oregon), and Kenneth Schlesinger (Lehman College).

We are seeking case studies, qualitative research studies, quantitative research studies, survey research studies, and other research-based solutions that can be implemented in today’s libraries. A more detailed outline appears below.

Proposals, including a 600-800 word abstract, should be submitted by August 19, 2019. Notification of acceptance will occur by the end of September 2019. Selected authors should expect to submit a full draft of their article no later than January 14, 2020.

Call for Proposals:
https://tinyurl.com/yyefwazv

Send questions to Head Editors Brian Lym (blym@hunter.cuny.edu) and Corliss Lee (clee@library.berkeley.edu).

Book Outline

The well-documented lack of diversity in the academic library workforce remains problematic, especially given growing expectations that the overall academic workforce be more representative of the increasingly diverse student bodies at our colleges and universities. That the lack of diversity is especially notable among the professional ranks (librarians, library leadership, and administrators) is indicative of inequity of opportunities for people of color and “minoritized” ethnic groups.

Further, remediation of racial and ethnic diversity in the academic library workplace raises broader diversity issues, including individuals with identities outside the gender binary and other individuals who face discrimination due to their sexual orientation, disabilities, religious affiliation, military status, age, or other identities.

Emerging efforts to diversify the academic library workplace are pointedly raising issues of inclusion in libraries where demographic homogeneity has historically prevailed. With Implementing  excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, we hope to capture emerging research and practice that
demonstrate ways academic libraries and librarians can work with and within their institutions to create a more equitable and representative workforce.

Part 1: Leveraging and Deploying Systemic and Bureaucratic/Structural Solutions
Since colleges and universities are hierarchical and complex systems with centralized and bureaucratic controls that can effect or impede transformative change, academic library leaders need to leverage and deploy formal structures and administrative resources to achieve DEI excellence.

Themes (Part 1):

  • Recruitment and Hiring
  • Retention and Advancement
  • Professional Development and Support
  • Assessment: Tracking DEI Progress

Part 2: Leveraging Collegial Networks, Politics, and Symbols:
Strengthening and Deepening Change for DEI Excellence; Acknowledging and deploying collegial networks, leveraging informal and formal political power, and symbolic resources to foster diversity, equity, and inclusion excellence in academic libraries.

Themes (Part 2):

  • Navigating Collegial Networks and Normative Expectations
  • Leveraging the Politics of Organizational Behavior (formal and informal power)
  • Reinforcing the Message: Deploying Change Through Deployment of Symbolic Activities

New Issue: Library Trends

I am deviating from posting archives-related content because I believe many of you will be interested in this special issue of Library Trends. While I have not (yet) read it, I hope it contains information that we can also use in our practices.

______________________________________

Volume 67, Number 3, Winter 2019
Disabled Adults in Libraries
Jessica Schomberg and Shanna Hollich, Issue Editors

Introduction
Jessica Schomberg, Shanna Hollich

Articles

The Impact of Disbelief: On Being a Library Employee with a Disability
JJ Pionke

Reproductive Failure and Information Work: An Autoethnography
Gina Schlesselman-Tarango

Disability, Identity, and Professionalism: Precarity in Librarianship
Christine M. Moeller

Claiming Our Space: A Quantitative and Qualitative Picture of Disabled Librarians
Robin Brown, Scott Sheidlower

Disability, the Silent D in Diversity
Teneka Williams, Asha Hagood

Evaluating the User Experience of Patrons with Disabilities at a Community College Library
Catherine Pontoriero, Gina Zippo-Mazur

Access Provision for Sight Impaired Students (SISs) in Nigerian University Libraries
Emmanuel Chukwudi Ihekwoaba, Roseline Ngozi Okwor, Austin Jude Chikaodi Mole, Caroline Uchenna Nnadi

Supporting Students with Histories of Trauma in Libraries: A Collaboration of Accessibility and Library Services
Sasha Conley, Aaron Ferguson, Alana Kumbier

Beyond Sensory Story Time: An Intersectional Analysis of Information Seeking Among Parents of Autistic Individuals
Amelia N. Gibson, Dana Hanson-Baldauf

Call for Chapters: Digital Heritage in Cultural Conflicts

The DigiCONFLICT international Research Consortium are seeking proposals for chapter contributions to an academic, peer-reviewed, edited volume on uses and abuses of digital heritage in the context of socially and politically charged cultural conflicts.

DigiCONFLICT is a Research Consortium funded by the Joint Programming Initiative on Cultural Heritage. Its founding research partners are based in the United Kingdom, Poland, and Sweden, each exploring the impact of digital heritage in nationally framed cultural conflicts. While acknowledging the role digitalization plays in shaping transnational attitudes to cultural heritage, members of the DigiCONFLICT Research Consortium contest common convictions about the allegedly universal and democratic nature of digital heritage. Also recognizing the role digital heritage plays in increasing access to cultural heritage and in making cultural heritage products readily available across borders, they pay particular attention to the ways in which digital heritage reflects and frames given societies as well as their complex historical and cultural power structures.

Investigating how different professional, ethnic, national, civil and other interest groups anywhere in the world employ digital heritage to advance their agendas, we are interested in receiving empirically as well as theoretically underpinned chapter proposals on subjects, themes, and case studies related, but not limited, to questions such as:

  • How does specifically national politics affect digital definitions and the scope of what counts as cultural heritage?
  • How do transitions of in/tangible forms of cultural heritage into digital formats and displays affect public engagement with them?
  • How is the scope and value of cultural heritage being negotiated in diverse culturally, socially and politically charged digital contexts?
  • How do individuals and/or interest groups use and engage with digital heritage to resist acts of social, political, or cultural oppression/repression.
  • How do individuals or interest groups engage with digital heritage to enhance, modify, or contest forms of intergenerational communication about history and past experiences.

Members of the DigiCONFLICT Research Consortium take specific interest in multimedia museums, oral history, and photography as the most common media employed in the creation and dissemination of digital heritage. Nevertheless, keen to expand as well as delve deeper into this range of interests, we equally welcome chapter proposals on these and any other media and practices.

The volume editors will be the Consortium’s founding partners: Gil Pasternak (DigiCONFLICT Project Leader and UK Team Principal Investigator), Ewa Manikowska (Polish Team Principal Investigator), and Malin Thor Tureby (Swedish Team Principal Investigator). It will be published with a well-recognized, academic publisher, and it is intended that the book/chapters will be Open Access.

While preparing your proposal, you may want to know that each chapter in the edited volume will ideally range between 7,500 and 8,000 words (including notes and references/bibliography).

In addition, the proposals should not exceed 500 words while clearly identifying the subject and main argument of the intended contribution, and indicating with as much specificity as possible what primary sources are going to inform the discussion (for example, interviews, archival research, participant observations, digital ethnography etc).

A list of up to 5 keywords and a short bibliography of relevance to your proposal may also be included in the submission (i.e. beyond the 500 words already allocated).

All chapter proposals must be written in English, and should be sent to DigiCONFLICT@gmail.com by the 7th of June 2019.

Thank you very much and we look forward to hearing from you.

DigiCONFLICT | Research Consortium

Gil Pasternak, Project Leader and UK Team Principal Investigator
Ewa Manikowska, Polish Team Principal Investigator
Malin Thor Tureby, Swedish Team Principal Investigator

Contact Info:
For any queries please contact Dr Gil Pasternak
Contact Email: gpasternak@dmu.ac.uk

CFP: Information Studies, Race and Racism (second call)

Guest Editors:
Melissa Villa-Nicholas
Latesha Velez

Description

As Safiya Noble asserts in her seminal work Algorithms of Oppression “The cultural practices of our society…are part of the ways in which race-neutral narratives have increased investments in Whiteness” (p. 59). There is a need to disrupt these race-neutral narratives in Information Studies research and there is a growing body of work that does just that by re-orienting Information Studies research to centralize discussions of race and racism. Many researchers also use critical theories to help analyze their findings or are offering counter-narratives highlighting minoritized actors (such as women and people of color). Re-centering Information Studies by contextualizing it within an analysis of how race and racism affects our field changes what we think we know, and our understandings about Information Studies. Only when these alternate narratives are integrated into the fabric of Information Studies research can Information Studies begin interrogating the long held beliefs in our field.

We are intentionally casting a wide net and invite authors from a broad range of professional and academic backgrounds to contribute to this special issue of Open Information Science journal. We are asking for submissions that centralize the theme of Information Studies, race and racism, in order to evolve the field into a more critical theoretical foundation that moves away from colorblind ideology and narratives of neutrality, which only serve to disguise the ubiquity of whiteness.

The scope of this issue might include, but is not limited to, research on:

  • Anti-racism methods in Information Studies
  • Critical Race Theory and Information Studies
  • Deconstructing ‘colorblindness’ in Information Studies and/or information institutions
  • Intersectional analysis of Information Studies (race and : gender, sexuality, class, disability and ableism, indigeneity,
  • Classifications, cataloging, and taxonomies
  • Analysis of whiteness and information organizations, information institutions, or applications of whiteness studies to Information Studies
  • How notions of race and racism affect our we conceptualize and teach information literacy
  • Contemporary or historical debates around race and/or racism in information institutions (Libraries, Archives, Museums, special collections, business, education, labor, Silicon Valley, Government, incarceration)
  • Big Data, race and racism
  • Race and racism as it relates to knowledge organization
  • Anti racism or applications of an analysis of racism of Information Studies in non-Western and/or non U.S. contexts
  • Information, surveillance, and racism

How to Submit

Authors are kindly invited to register at our paper processing system at: http://www.editorialmanager.com/opis/ and submit their contribution.

Every manuscript should be clearly marked as intended for this special issue. All papers will go through the Open Information Science’s high standards, quick, fair and comprehensive peer-review procedure. Instructions for authors are available here. In case of any questions, please contact Guest Editors or Managing Editor (katarzyna.grzegorek@degruyter.com).

As an author of Open Information Science you will benefit from:

  • transparent, comprehensive and fast peer review managed by our esteemed Guest Editor;
  • efficient route to fast-track publication and full advantage of De Gruyter e-technology;
  • no publication fees;
  • free language assistance for authors from non-English speaking regions.

The deadline is June, the 30th, 2019.

Contact Info:
In case of any questions, please contact Guest Editors or Managing Editor (katarzyna.grzegorek@degruyter.com).

Contact Email: Lukasz.Gworek@degruyter.com

URL: https://www.degruyter.com/page/1930