CFP: The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy

The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy

General Issue
Issue Editors:
Shelly Eversley, Baruch College, CUNY
Krystyna Michael, The Graduate Center, CUNY

The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy (JITP) seeks scholarly work that explores the intersection of technology with teaching, learning, and research. We are interested in contributions that take advantage of the affordances of digital platforms in creative ways. We invite both textual and multimedia submissions employing interdisciplinary and creative approaches in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences. Besides scholarly papers, the submissions can consist of audio or visual presentations and interviews, dialogues, or conversations; creative/artistic works; manifestos; or other scholarly materials, including work that addresses the labor and care considerations of academic technology projects.

All work appearing in the Issues section of JITP is reviewed by the issue editors and independently by two scholars in the field, who provide formative feedback to the author(s) during the review process. We practice signed, as opposed to blind, peer review. We intend that the journal itself—both in our process and in our digital product—serve as an opportunity to reveal, reflect on, and revise academic publication and classroom practices. Additionally, all submissions will be considered for our “Behind the Seams” feature, in which we publish dynamic representations of the revision and editorial processes, including reflections from the authorial and editorial participants.

Research-based submissions should include discussions of approach, method, and analysis. When possible, research data should be made publicly available and accessible via the Web and/or other digital mechanisms, a process that JITP can and will support as necessary. Successes and interesting failures are equally welcome. Submissions that focus on pedagogy should balance theoretical frameworks with practical considerations of how new technologies play out in both formal and informal educational settings. Discipline-specific submissions should be written for non-specialists.

As a courtesy to our reviewers, we will not consider simultaneous submissions, but we will do our best to reply to you within three months of the submission deadline. The expected length for finished manuscripts is under 5,000 words. All work should be original and previously unpublished. Essays or presentations posted on a personal blog may be accepted, provided they are substantially revised; please contact us with any questions at editors@jitpedagogy.org.

For further information on style and formatting, accessibility requirements, and multimedia submissions, consult JITP’s accessibility guidelinesstyle guide and multimedia submission guidelines.

Important Dates

Submission deadline for full manuscripts is May 15, 2019. Please view our submission guidelines for information about submitting to the Journal.

Themed Issue, The Journal of Interactive Technology & Pedagogy: Teaching & Research with Archives

The Journal of Interactive Technology & Pedagogy: Teaching & Research with Archives, Issue Fourteen

Introduction
Danica Savonick, Jojo Karlin, and Stephen Klein

Possibly Impossible; Or, Teaching Undergraduates to Confront Digital and Archival Research Methodologies, Social Media Networking, and Potential Failure 
Rebekah Fitzsimmons and Suzan Alteri

From Page to Screen and Back Again: Archives-Centered Pedagogy in the 21st Century Writing Classroom
Elizabeth Davis, Nancee Reeves, and Teresa Saxton

Crowdsourcing Traumatic History: Understanding the Historial Archive
Kristi Girdharry

Digital Paxton: Collaborative Construction with Eighteenth-Century Manuscript Collections
Will Fenton, Kate Johnson, and Kelly Schmidt

The Space Between Researcher, Object, Institution: Building Collaborative Knowledge with Primary Sources
Mary Catherine Kinniburgh

Narrating Memory through Rhetorical Reflections: CUNY Students and Their Archives
Wendy Hayden, María Hernández-Ojeda, and Iris Finkel

Engaging Women’s History through Collaborative Archival Wikipedia Projects  

Ariella Rotramel, Rebecca Parmer, and Rose Oliveira

Collaboration Adventures with Primary Sources: Exploring Creative and Digital Outputs
Jennifer Needham and Jeanann Croft Haas

Realizing the Past: Charting a Course for Sustainable Instruction and Engagement with Archival Materials Using Augmented and Virtual Reality Technologies
Amanda G. Pellerin, Ximin Mi, and Alison Valk

Branching Out: Using Historical Records to Connect with the Environment
Wendy Wasman, Thomas Beatman, Shanon Donnelly, Kathryn Flinn, Jeremy Spencer, and Ryan Trimbath

Views from the Field

Teaching Colonial Translations Through Archives: From Ink and Quill to XML (Or Not)
Allison Margaret Bigelow

Diving into the Wreck: (Re)Creating the Archive in the First Year Writing Classroom 
Maxine Krenzel and Daisy Atterbury

Born-Digital Archives in the Undergraduate Classroom
Mackenzie Brooks

How a Digital Collaboration at Oberlin College Between Archivists, Faculty, Students and Librarians Found Its Muse in Mary Church Terrell, Nineteenth-Century Feminist and Civil Rights Icon
Ken Grossi, Alexia Hudson-Ward, Carol Lasser, Sarah Minion, and Natalia Shevin

Issue Fourteen Masthead

Issue Editors
Danica Savonick
Jojo Karlin
Stephen Klein

Managing Editor
Patrick DeDauw

Copyeditors
Anne Donlon
Patrick DeDauw
Jojo Karlin
Benjamin Miller
Nicole Zeftel

Style and Structure Editor
Dominique Zino

Staging Editors
Teresa Ober
Lisa Brundage
Anne Donlon
Krystyna Michael
Benjamin Miller
Danica Savonick
sava saheli singh
Inés Vañó García
Luke Waltzer

Archives-Focused Issue: Public

Public: 57, Summer 2018
(subscription/purchase)

ARCHIVE/COUNTER-ARCHIVES advances conversations regarding the changing nature and political realities of audio and visual heritage in the twenty-first century. Bringing together artists, archivists, and researchers, this issue of PUBLIC argues that the re-thinking of audio-visual heritage preservation is ultimately strategic and political, especially given the precarious material conditions of archives in the digital era, and the fact that colonial and racialized forms of structural control over the history of place and belonging continue to embargo access to the past for many communities. This issue thus turns towards the transformative potential of counter-archives, which can be political, ingenious, resistant, and community-based. These insurgent archives are embodied differently and have explicit intention to historicize differently, to disrupt conventional national narratives, and to write difference into public accounts. PUBLIC 57 also brings to the fore the work of women and Indigenous, racialized, diasporic, and LGBT2Q+ communities to create counter-archives that expand, interrogate, and disrupt conventional archives and archival methodologies.

Call for papers: GKMC special issue on Community and small archives

Call for papers: GKMC special issue on Community and small archives. Submission deadline: 15 February 2019.

This is a call for papers on community and small archives for a special issue of Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication

Recently there has been noticeable growth in discussion around community and small archives. Such archives may be stand-alone or part of other organisations such as schools, universities, historic societies, churches, cultural or indigenous communities, and local government or quasi-government organisations. They are often the result of local or community initiatives (where community does not necessarily have a geographic meaning). The notion of critical archiving and giving voice to the marginalised and non-elites is another important aspect, and community archives are considered to challenge the dominant modes of archival practice. Yet the realities of day-to-day practice in small archives are not widely understood or acknowledged by the mainstream or formal archive sector, and it can be difficult to identify key themes or concerns for community and small archives.

Papers are requested that explore the nature and use of community and small archives, their collections and management, and their place in the wider cultural heritage industries. Practitioner perspectives and case studies are especially encouraged.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:
* Community archives and digital heritage
* The management of community and small archives including the use of volunteers, access, funding, governance, and strategy
* Diversity and discrimination vs the neutrality of the archives
* Social justice and community archives
* The nature and diversity of collections in community archives including digital collections and the issues around digital preservation and/or digitisation
* The use of community archives in digital humanities and local history
* Training and professional development for community archivists and archives staff
* Case studies and practitioner perspectives on the role, purpose, and place of community archives
* Cross-sectoral and shared practice around small and community archives or collections
* The place of community archives in the wider archival environment
* The place of community archives in the cultural heritage industries

Submission deadline: 15 February 2019

Guest Editors:
Sarah Welland
Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
sarah.welland@openpolytechnic.ac.nz

Dr Amanda Cossham
Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
amanda.cossham@openpolytechnic.ac.nz

Further information can be found here: Community and small archives: evaluating, preserving, accessing, and engaging with community-based archival heritage http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/call_for_papers.htm?id=8127

CFP: Special Issue of The Journal of Popular Culture: Archives and Popular Culture

Guest Editors      

  • Rüstem Ertuğ Altınay, University of Vienna
  • Olivera Jokic, City University of New York

Description

This special issue explores the intricate relationship between archives and popular culture: how archives shape our understanding of “popular culture,” and how diverse forms of popular culture shape conceptions and contents of archives. Conventional conceptualizations of the archive as the repository of authoritative historical documents, assembled and maintained by institutions of the state, have increasingly been challenged. Formation of repositories, in public and private, of materials created by individuals who lack epistemic authority has been of interest not only to historians looking for traces of their lives. Especially through diverse forms of popular culture—from books, photography, video, and music to statues and garments—archives have taken on new lives to become part of public culture. In such cultural products, that which ostensibly belongs to history shapes how we understand the past, can experience the present, and imagine the future.

While both mainstream and unorthodox archives gain new lives in and through popular culture, they also challenge our contemporary conceptions of “popular culture” by revealing how the definitions of popular culture have changed, and how new genres of documentation have emerged and disappeared over time. With the profound transformation of the recording media and conceptions of literacy, these processes have reached an unprecedented speed. As more people have acquired access to recording, distribution, and preservation of written and visual texts with broad availability of high-speed Internet connections, the time difference between the moment of recording and the moment of historiography has shrunk beyond measure. The archive is still about the past, but the past may appear closer than ever to the present.

The questions we would like to explore include, but are not limited to:

  • What is the role of the archive in defining what is popular?
  • Can archives be classified as products of popular culture? When and how do some archives become popular?
  • What would an archive of popularity look like?
  • How do archives reproduce or challenge our conceptions of the popular?
  • How does popular culture produce unorthodox archives?
  • How do artifacts of popular culture use archives to create continuity or difference between the past and the present?
  • How do archives of the popular shape the desires and imaginations of the future?
  • How do minoritarian producers of popular culture use or re-define archives of oppression and dominance? What prospects and limitations are involved in such endeavors?
  • What are the affective politics of archival praxis, and how do they unravel in the context of popular culture?
  • What has been the effect of the digital and mobile technologies on the relationship between the archive and popular culture?

If you are interested in contributing to this special issue, please send a 300-word abstract to the editors, Rüstem Ertuğ Altınay (rea270@nyu.edu) and Olivera Jokic (ojokic@jjay.cuny.edu), by November 30, 2018. Authors will be notified in early December 2018 whether they should submit a full version of their article for peer review. Full-length articles of 5,000–7,500 words will be due by December 1, 2019. Please note that final decisions about publication will depend on the peer-review process.

CFP (abstract deadline 9/29): Featured section in History in Africa: Archives, the Digital Turn and Governance in Africa

Featured section in History in Africa:
Archives, the Digital Turn and Governance in Africa

Guest editors:

Dr Marie Rodet, School of Oriental and African Studies
Dr Vincent Hiribarren, King’s College London
Fabienne Chamelot, University of Portsmouth

digital.turn.africa@gmail.com

Deadline for abstracts: 29 September 2017

This featured section of History in Africa will address the wave of digitisation of archives in Africa over the last fifteen years. With the rise of information technologies, an increasing part of public – and to some extent private – African archives are being digitised and made accessible on the internet. This wave of digitisation is usually seen as a progress with the help of ambitious initiatives applying new technologies to cultural heritage of humanity such as the rescue of the manuscripts of Timbuktu or the Endangered Archives programme at the British Library. Yet as much as these new technologies raise enthusiasm, they also prompt discussions amongst researchers and archivists, which go from intellectual property to sovereignty and governance.

First, in the digital era, the issue of the ownership of these documents is crucial since the very definition of an archive is being challenged: from unique hard copies of documents, they can now exist in a variety of formats reproducible at will. Second, technical and economic issues at stake are also key to the discussion and intertwined with that of sovereignty: institutions elaborating a digitisation programme may do so under the pressure of donors or non-African scholars. All in all, beyond the discourse of transparency, whether to the benefit of governance or that of scientific research, this matter is eminently political. These archives are thus concerned with negotiations which go far beyond their sole technical and scientific aspect.

In the field of history, archives are usually addressed as sources for research, and questioned as such because of their documentary aspect. More rarely are they approached as historically constructed systems combining intellectual and physical aspects, as archival science theorises it. Yet digital archiving disrupts archival norms and practices, opening up a field of reflection relatively little explored by historians. The digital turn of African archives is therefore an object of study in its own right, located at the crossroads of political and economic interests.

This featured section seeks to reflect on the practices of digitisation of archives in Africa (pre-colonial, colonial or postcolonial) and to engage both with history and archival science.

Submission instructions

If you wish to contribute, please submit a 500-word abstract of the proposed paper as well as a short CV by Friday 29 September 2017 to digital.turn.africa@gmail.com

Notifications of decision will be sent by Friday 27 October 2017.

Selected authors will then be expected to send their full-length paper (no more than 10,000 words, including notes) by Friday 16 February 2018.

All completed papers will be subject to peer-reviewing process in accordance with History in Africa requirements.

Please address any query you may have to digital.turn.africa@gmail.com

CFP: LGBTQ Public History

THE PUBLIC HISTORIAN SEEKS ARTICLES ON LGBTQ PUBLIC HISTORY

In light of the LGTBQ theme study recently released by the National Park Service, The Public Historian invites proposals for articles to be published in a special issue of the journal on LGTBQ public history to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising. A broad range of proposals focused on LGBTQ public history in North America and beyond are encouraged, including community-based projects, oral history, digital history and new media, museum exhibits, archival initiatives, collective memory, and public history education and training. Proposals for alternative formats, such as reports from the field, interviews with practitioners, and roundtable discussions, will also be welcome. Proposals, which should be no longer than one double-spaced page, should be submitted to The Public Historian at scase@history.ucsb.edu and to the guest editor, Melinda Marie Jetté, at jettem@franklinpierce.edu. The deadline for submission of proposals is April 26, 2017. Selected authors will be notified by May 24, 2017. Articles will be due by January 1, 2018. Publication of the special issue of The Public Historian will be in 2019, Volume 41).