CFP: Online webinars from Eogan: Energy Archives during COVID-19

As uncertainty reigns over the future, EOGAN would like to organise an online event for archivists, particularly in the energy sector, to informally meet and discuss their fears, solutions, and stories of working from home (or not) during the lockdown.

They would like to hear about new ways to interact with researchers and document collections, the state of digitisation and online access, what future for archives in the era of Coronavirus. In particular, if you work for a company’s archive, what provisions did the company or institution made / is planning for the archive? The energy sector, and the oil sector in particular, is under immense strain: how can archives be useful for developing a historically informed understanding of these processes, and thinking up appropriate strategies for interventions? Have there been requests to access specific files? How is smart working being organised for corporate archives?

The meeting aims to be an informal gathering; if you are interested in speaking, send an email at eogan.network[at]gmail.com with a quick summary of what you would like to discuss, and your availabilities for June.

Ideally they would receive these expressions of interest by the 15th May, so to decide a date for the webinars collectively.

Read more on: https://www.eogan.org/open-call-for-papers

ATALM Presentations available

We have good news! The narrated presentations of nineteen sessions recorded at the 2019 Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums (ATALM) Annual Conference, held in Temecula, California, are now available on the Sustainable Heritage Network. Each of these sessions were included in the conference’s Professional Development Certificate program and correlate with either the Library Services and Programs Certificate or the Language Preservation and Revitalization Certificate.

We are pleased to share these ATALM sessions from forty-two experts working in archives, libraries, and museums across the United States. This new set of resources covers language documentation, grant writing and reporting, international collaborations, digital records management, photo digitization, or community engagement, and more. If you were not able to attend one of these ATALM sessions or would like a refresher, visit this collection on the SHN: http://www.sustainableheritagenetwork.org/collection/2019-narrated-presentations

Please note that Professional Development Certificate sessions are organized by their respective focus under the “In this Collection” box in the page linked above.

Thanks to all the session leaders!

Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and MuseumsInstitute of Museum and Library ServicesSIL InternationalLittle Big Horn College Library/ ArchivesAcademy of Motion Picture Arts and SciencesNortheast Document Conservation CenterHuna Heritage FoundationNational Endowment For HumanitiesNational Endowment for the ArtsNational Park ServiceZiibiwing Center of Anishinabe Culture and LifewaysNational Native American Boarding School Healing CoalitionSherman Indian MuseumNorthern Arizona UniversityUBC Museum Of AnthropologyIndigenous Library Services, University of ManitobaQuapaw Tribal LibraryHennepin County LibraryMinnesota Department of EducationHistorypinSustainable MuseumsSaginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe Tribal OperationsUniversity of Alaska Fairbanks Rasmuson LibraryAlaska State LibraryMontana Historical SocietyCatawba Cultural CenterCenter for Digital Scholarship and Curation

MLA Citation for Canceled Presentation

How do I list on my CV a presentation for a conference that was canceled?

If the conference that accepted your presentation was canceled, you may list the presentation on your CV under a header such as “Accepted Papers” or “Invited Speeches” and note that the conference did not take place. The following provides an example:

Chen, Joanne. “Strategies for Teaching Grammar to First-Year College Students.” Conference on College Composition and Communication, Milwaukee, WI, 25–28 Mar. 2020. Conference canceled.

If you have an abstract or the paper, you might consider depositing it on a noncommercial repository like the MLA’s Humanities Commons so that you can get a DOI, share your work with colleagues, and invite feedback.

How to Create an APA Style Reference for a Canceled Conference Presentation

To help slow the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), officials have canceled many public events, including conferences and conventions. This has raised a question for researchers who were planning to present.

Question: How should the APA Style reference for an accepted presentation appear on my CV when the conference has been canceled?

Answer: Include the presentation in your CV, as your work was peer reviewed and accepted, but consider which of the following cases is most applicable.

Note that in the examples shown in this post, the text in brackets varies by the type of contribution, as described in Section 10.5 of the Publication Manual (7th ed.). Options for bracketed text include “Conference session,” “Paper presentation,” “Keynote address,” and so forth. Use the labeling that matches what a user would see in the program or website for the conference.

Read more

CFP: Multiple conferences, CLIR’s Digital Library Federation

CLIR’s Digital Library Federation is pleased to announce that we have opened Calls for Proposals for our conferences happening over a week this November in Baltimore, Maryland: the DLF Forum, Learn@DLF, Digital Preservation 2020, and this year, CLIR’s Digitizing Hidden Collections Symposium.

For all events, we welcome submissions from members and nonmembers alike. Students, practitioners, and others from any related field are invited to submit for one conference or multiple (though, different proposals for each, please).

  • The DLF Forum (#DLFforum, November 9-11), our signature event, includes digital library practitioners and others from member institutions and the broader community, for whom it serves as a meeting place, marketplace, and congress. In these respects, the event is a chance for attendees to conduct business, present work, share experiences, practices and information, and assess DLF’s programs and progress with community participation and input. Learn more and check out the CFP here: https://forum2020.diglib.org/call-for-proposals
  • Learn@DLF (#LearnAtDLF, November 8) is our dedicated pre-conference workshop day for digging into tools, techniques, workflows, and concepts. Through engaging, hands-on sessions, attendees will gain experience with new tools and resources, exchange ideas, and develop and share expertise with fellow community members. Learn more and check out the CFP here: https://forum2020.diglib.org/learnatdlf/
  • Digital Preservation (#digipres20, November 11-12), NDSA‘s major meeting and conference, will help to chart future directions for both the NDSA and digital stewardship, and is expected to be a crucial venue for intellectual exchange, community-building, development of best practices, and national-level agenda-setting in the field. Learn more and check out the CFP for this year’s event, with the theme Get Active with Digital Preservation, here: https://ndsa.org/digital-preservation-2020-cfp/
  • CLIR’s Digitizing Hidden Collections Symposium (#digHC, November 11-12), is a two-day event for CLIR’s Digitizing Hidden Collections grant recipients and the wider library and archives communities to celebrate and reflect on five years of project work. Recipients’ collective experiences will create opportunities to discuss the current state and future potential of digitization practice in collecting institutions, including how the digital cultural record can better reflect the diversity of human experience, how law and ethics affect strategies for access, and how technologies and standards can improve discovery and learning. Learn more and check out the CFP here: https://www.clir.org/hiddencollections/2020-symposium/call-for-proposals/.

Please keep in mind that submissions for the Digitizing Hidden Collections Symposium should come from current or former participants in CLIR Digitizing Hidden Collections grant projects.

Session options range from 2-minute lighting talk sessions at DigiPres to half-day workshops at Learn@DLF, with many options in between.

New this year, we’ve put together a video with some tips for successful conference proposals. We encourage everyone to watch and incorporate these suggestions clearly into your submissions. Watch the video here: https://youtu.be/xxrIQ273q30

The deadline for all three opportunities is Monday, April 27 at 11:59pm Eastern Time.

If you have any questions, please write to us at forum@diglib.org. We’re looking forward to seeing you in Baltimore.

P.S. Want to stay updated on all things #DLFforum? Subscribe to our Forum newsletter or follow us at @CLIRDLF on Twitter.

CFP: Time/Location/Mode of Participation Changes: JCDL 2020 Practitioners Track

Due to the COVID-19 outbreak in Wuhan,  JCDL 2020 Organizing Committee has
made the following changes:

• Delay the conference date to August 1-5, 2020, which is right after ACM
SIGIR 2020 (July 25-30, 2020)
• Move the conference site to Xi’an China, which is at the same site as ACM
SIGIR 2020
• Allow virtual attendance/presentation of papers
• Not enforce the “no show” policy

These changes allow JCDL 2020 and SIGIR 2020 to be two conferences that are
back to back. Therefore, it is possible for attendees to attend two important
and relevant conferences with just one trip. The Organizing Committee of JCDL
2020 are working with that of SIGIR 2020 to explore further collaboration
between the two conferences.

JCDL 2020 continues to invite submissions to a newly created Practitioners
Track.

Practitioners Track Proposals

The practitioners track emphasizes innovation, insight, and vision in the
practice of digital libraries. It provides opportunities for libraries,
archives, museums, publishers, and digital content industry partners to
showcase their latest novel, speculative, and even provocative ideas,
practices, case studies, technologies, productions, strategies, datasets, and/
or designs related to digital library practices and services. Topics include
but are not limited to

• practice of emergency planning and response for libraries, archives, and
museums
• digital repositories
• digital collections development and management
• metadata and discovery services
• open access and scholarly communication
• open educational resources
• teaching and learning support
• digital publishing
• big data and library cyberinfrastructure
• research data management, digital curation, and stewardship
• digital humanities
• digital preservation
• information service
• information/data literacy
• digital heritage/culture

Authors must label their submissions with at least one of the following four
streams. Submissions will be evaluated using criteria set forth in the
respective stream. There is no expectation that a submission must cover all
four streams.

1. “I have a dream”. Submissions to this stream should focus on the vision,
speculation, or prophetic prediction of trends on a) the future environment
and/or ecosystem for libraries, museums, archives and related industry and b)
how do we adapt and flourish. Proposals will be mainly evaluated on vision,
novelty, and potential impact. We particularly encourage high-risk high-reward
ideas, as long as the risks are clearly articulated and assessed.

2. “Told you so”. Submissions to this stream provide theoretical,
experimental, computational, synthetic, or empirical proof or myth rebuttal
related to popular and current digital library trends and practices. Proposals
are expected to be well-referenced and balanced, and also offer nuance and
clearly laid-out limitations. The evaluation will be focused on the merits of
the arguments, as well as their potential impacts on the practices.

3. “We can do it”. Submission to this steam showcase exemplary projects,
products, or services that have already been launched. Proposals may be
further broken down into substreams such as a) “We did it first”, where
novelty and differentiation factors are highlighted; b) “We do it best”, which
focuses on the overall value gained by the patrons, communities, and the
society; or c) “We can do better”, which highlights critical improvements.
Proposals in this stream will be evaluated on the verifiable benefits these
projects bring.

4. “Together we’ll go far”. Submissions to this stream emphasize broad
collaborations, e.g., those beyond boundaries of departments, libraries,
institutions, academic disciplines, communities, regions, or even countries.
Authors should clearly articulate what, how, and why the collaboration works
and what values the collaboration brings to each partner.

Proposals should consist of a title, extended abstract, and contact
information for the authors, and should not exceed 2 pages. As indicated in
the JCDL 2020 Call for Submissions, Practitioners Track submissions should use
the ACM Proceedings template
(http://www.acm.org/publications/proceedings-template) and are to be submitted
in electronic format via the conference’s EasyChair submission page
(https://easychair.org/my/conference?conf=jcdl2020).

Accepted proposals to the Practitioners Track will be included in the
conference proceedings and will be presented at the conference in visual
formats including but are not limited to posters, videos, or system and
production demonstrations. At least one author of each accepted proposal is
expected to give a one-minute presentation.

All questions concerning the practitioners track proposals should be discussed
with the track co-chairs prior to the submission deadline of April 6, 2020.
Notification of acceptance is April 27, 2020 . This year’s practitioners track
co-chairs are:

Zhiwu Xie, Virginia Tech Libraries, USA zhiwuxie@vt.edu
Long Xiao, Peking University Library, China, China lxiao@lib.pku.edu.cn
Wei Liu, Shanghai Library, China kevenlw@gmail.com

Call for Papers: Intimacy and Interaction The 2020 Meeting of the American Society for Ethnohistory

Though this call does not mention archives, it may be of interest to those who work with tribal collections.

___________________________________________

Intimacy and Interaction

The 2020 Meeting of the American Society for Ethnohistory

Durham, North Carolina

The program committee of the 2020 ASE conference invites submissions for the annual meeting to take place on November 4-8, 2020 in downtown Durham, North Carolina.  We invite panel proposals on any topic related to ethnohistory and especially within this year’s theme: Intimacy and Interaction.  The program committee encourages thematic panels that include perspectives from both North and Latin America, as well as panels that include perspectives from other areas of the world.

As you think about the topic of Intimacy and Interaction, we note that the re-structuring to which this CFP refers includes religious ceremonialism, language, re-adjustments of spatial configurations of families and communities, and the simple exigencies of material and cultural survival. We ask you to consider such questions as: How have indigenous peoples structured notions of intimacy and intimate relationships? How have colonial rule, settler colonialism, and empire formation forced a restructuring of intimate interactions between people both within indigenous communities and between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples? How have extended families, family networks, and communities been altered or disrupted (often violently) by colonial and neocolonial forces? How has the law been used to alter, limit, control, or outlaw intimate relationships within indigenous societies or between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples? How have capitalism, neoliberalism, globalization and other institutional forces altered notions of intimate relationships among indigenous peoples? How have indigenous and non-indigenous peoples responded to these structural forces?

We will consider proposals for multiple formats including panels, roundtables, and public workshops, but we strongly encourage creativity, moving beyond the typical 20-minute paper presentation format. We also strongly encourage individuals who have paper ideas to get together with others through various forums in order to meet other people working on related topics.  If you are thinking about an individual paper, please post on H-AmIndian, H-LatAm, H-Borderlands, or similar listservs to find others who are interested in presenting related papers.

If you have any questions about proposals, please email the program committee assistant at ethnohistory@duke.edu.

Please note that panels can consist of three to four papers, while roundtables and “working-groups/workshops” can be more loosely formatted by each organizer, but all need to adhere to each session’s 90-minute time slot.  Please ensure your proposal has a designated chair.  You may include a separate commentator before audience discussion, or you may designate the panel chair as commentator or discussion facilitator.  To maximize time for audience discussion, we ask papers to be 15-20 minutes (in a three-paper panel) or 10-15 minutes (in a 4-paper panel), with formal commentary no longer than 5 minutes.  Complete panel proposals with a chair and/or a commentator are preferred, but individual paper proposals will also be considered.

Submission Deadline: May 1, 2020

For each submission, organizers need to include:

  1. The session’s title
  2. Organizer’s name, title, and institutional affiliation
  3. Participant’s names, titles, and institutional affiliations

In addition, for each type of session listed below, the organizer must submit the relevant material:

  • Panels: panel abstract, titles and abstracts of all papers, abstracts not to be longer than 150 words
  • Roundtables: 300 word description of the topic and goals of the discussion
  • Working-groups/workshops: 300 word description of the topic and goals of the workshop

To submit, please have all required documentation collated into a single pdf file, named with the last name of the session’s organizer. It is not necessary to register for the conference in order to have a paper or panel accepted. Once papers and panels are accepted, however, each participant must register as an ASE member.

Email all proposals to: ethnohistory@duke.edu