SAA’s Archival History Section: Archival History Article Award

The AHS Award Committee is pleased to announce the selection of Patricia Kennedy Grimsted‘s chapter “Pan-European Displaced Archives in the Russian Federation: Still Prisoners of War on the 70th Anniversary of V-E Day” from the 2017 book Displaced Archives edited by James Lowry for the inaugural Archival History Article Award.

AHS created this prize to encourage and reward articles or other short pieces of superior excellence in the field of archival history. The committee was impressed by the depth of knowledge and research the author brought to the topic of displaced European records in Russia. Grimsted’s historical contextualization of the ongoing efforts of repatriation underscores the importance of the history of archives to our contemporary work. Click here for a copy of this excellent work. 

Call for Applications: Publications Editor

Become Part of SAA’s Dynamic Publishing Tradition!

The Society of American Archivists seeks an energetic individual to serve as Publications Editor and to continue the momentum of our dynamic publishing tradition.  SAA’s robust book publishing program has brought a rich variety of content to readers since the 1970s. The 150+ titles published by SAA since 2000 include original research, advanced texts, fundamentals, manuals, readers, and classics. Twenty modules have been published in the modular series Trends in Archives Practice. The first three volumes in the new Archival Fundamentals Series III and the first volume in a new series co-published with ALA, Archival Futures, were launched this summer. There are now seven open-access case studies series. And there are seventeen more projects in the pipeline.

The new Publications Editor will serve a three-year term beginning no later than April 1, 2020.

The Publications Editor is responsible for:

  • Setting a vision for the program and providing philosophical and strategic direction;
  • Directing the work of the Publications Board;
  • Acquiring manuscripts, writing, editing, and collaborating with authors;
  • Maintaining a clear and transparent review process;
  • Establishing and maintaining partnerships with other professional associations; and
  • With Council approval, seeking external financial support for specific projects.

The Publications Editor reports directly to the SAA Council and works closely with the Director of Publishing, who is responsible for production and business matters. The honorarium is commensurate with experience ($20,000–$30,000).

Qualifications:

  • SAA member with substantial archival experience;
  • Published author, skilled writer, and experienced editor;
  • Excellent communication, collaboration, and leadership skills;
  • Ability to nurture authors and board members;
  • Sufficient financial skill to ensure that the program remains within the budget established for it; and
  • Knowledge of current trends in the publishing industry.

Application

Please send a letter of interest and your curriculum vitae by November 1, 2019, to PubsEditorSearch@archivists.org.

New SAA Professional Writers Virtual Group

Greetings fellow archivists,

We are proud to announce a whole new way for Archivists to meet ad a whole new group to turn to for support…

Welcome to the Professional Writers Virtual Group!

This is an online-only group dedicated to the act of professional writing. It is a group that is under the auspices of the Society of American Archivists – and open to SAA members as well as non-SAA affiliated people.

Our goal to create a space where people can come together to support each other through the professional writing process. In the coming weeks we will be uploading basic resources to the document library, highlighting lesser-known opportunities to publish, and activities to help you go from idea to published piece.

To join to the virtual group just go to your Connect homepage and scroll down the Professional Writers Virtual Group and click join. Once you’ve joined you can send a message to the list at this address: ARCHIVISTS-professionalwritingvirtualgroup@ConnectedCommunity.org

The Connect page also has a Shared Files folder that includes the group’s mission statement, some resources, and a list of places to publish.

The most important part of this group will be the listserv. This is our mechanism to communicate – and we envision the conversations to be frequent and fruitful. Like all SAA lists, the PWVG is a safe space where you can ask any questions you have about professional writing and get the help you need.

The group is open to people who have published, who haven’t published but are interested, people who have ideas but need writing partners, those on the tenure track who need a mentor, or anyone who is interested in Professional Writing.

Stay tuned for more information, and happy writing!

Michelle, Rebecca, Alison, and Josh

Michelle Ganz
Archives Director
McDonough Innovation
michelle.ganz42@gmail.com

Alison Stankrauff
University Archivist
Wayne State University
alison.stankrauff@wayne.edu

Rebecca Hankins
Associate Professor
Africana and Women’s & Gender Studies Archivist/Librarian/Curator
Texas A&M University
rhankins@tamu.edu

Joshua Kitchens
Director, Master of Archival Studies Program
Clayton State University
JoshuaKitchens@clayton.edu

CFP: The American Archivist

Call for Journal Contributions on Design Records
You are invited to consider writing an article or presenting a case study on design records management, repositories, practices, content, etc., for volume 84, issue 1 (Fall/Winter 2021) of American Archivist. Visual materials are encouraged. Karen Jamison Trivette of the Fashion Institute of Technology – SUNY and a member of the American Archivist Editorial Board can answer any questions you may have about this special section and/or issue of the journal. She may be reached at karen_trivette@fitnyc.edu or 212-217-4386. Click here for more info on submissions. Submitting a written work for publication consideration in the journal is a wonderful way to reach out to your peers, contribute to the professional literature, and highlight your innovative practice and special content.

CFP: College & Undergraduate Libraries Special Issue on Technology

This call doesn’t specifically mention archives, but definitely relates.

_____________________________________

LIBRARY TECHNOLOGY: INNOVATING TECHNOLOGIES, SERVICES AND PRACTICES

Technology is ubiquitous and ever evolving in academic libraries ranging from the technology integrated in the physical library space to online presences that connect users to library resources. Keeping up with the constant development to library technology services and practices can be a challenge for any library—there could be financial, space, or staffing constraints in addition to other potential detractors. However, there are also ample opportunities to excel in specific areas of library technology in order to better serve our library users in their research and knowledge creation journey. Academic libraries can share their innovative implementation and management of technologies or technology related services and practices. These conversations drive the future of library technology and technology practices. It all starts with a spark of inspiration.

A CALL FOR PROPOSALS

College & Undergraduate Libraries, a peer-reviewed journal published by Taylor & Francis, invites proposals for a special issue focusing on innovative technologies, technology services and practices in academic libraries. Library technology is broadly defined to be inclusive of the various types of technologies academic libraries support. Potential submissions include research studies, case studies, best practices, or position papers involving:

  • Immersive research or programs such as augmented reality or virtual reality
  • Makerspaces or creation studios
  • Enhancing library space with technology
  • Sustainability and library technology
  • Assessing library technology services using UX practices
  • Evaluating library technology department workflows or functionality
  • Securing library technology
  • Privacy and ethics with library technology or library technology services
  • Internet of Things in an academic library
  • Designing academic library websites or technology services
  • Using analytics to improve a library service or online presence
  • Improving access to library resources via discovery services or library management systems
  • Exploring alternative means of authentication or improving current authentication systems
  • Incorporating machine learning or library data projects
  • Adding technology into library instruction or using innovative technology to teach remote learners
  • Teaching technology in an academic library
  • Intentionally designing learning spaces with technology
  • Using Git or other code repositories for library technology management
  • Strategic planning of technology services
  • Accessibility of library technologies
  • Increasing inclusion using technology
  • Innovative or inspiring library technology projects/programs
  • Technology trends outside the library we should be watching

Submissions may address opportunities, challenges, and criticism in any of these areas. Topics not listed in these themes may also be considered.

This special issue is set to be published in June 2020.

Submitting a Proposal

Proposals should include a title, an abstract (500 words maximum), keywords describing the article (6 keywords max), and author(s) contact information.

Please submit article proposals via email to Tabatha Farney (guest editor) at tfarney@uccs.edu by September 30th, 2019. Final manuscripts are due by February 15, 2020.

Feel free to contact me with any questions that you may have,

Tabatha Farney, guest editor
Director of Web Services and Emerging Technologies
Kraemer Family Library
University of Colorado Colorado Springs
tfarney@uccs.edu

Recent Issue: RBM

Spring 2019
Editor’s Note
Richard Saunders. “Editor’s Note.”

Research Articles
Maggie Gallup Kopp. “Internships in Special Collections: Experiential Pedagogy, Intentional Design, and High-Impact Practice.”

Sarah Wilkinson. “Who Owns these Records? Authority, Ownership, and Custody of Iraq’s Baath Party Records.”

Book Reviews

Cassie Brand. Eric Marshall White. Editio Princeps: A History of the Gutenberg Bible.

Katherine Fisher. Michèle Valerie Cloonan. The Monumental Challenge of Preservation: The Past in a Volatile World.

Tamara E. Livingston. Paul Conway and Martha O’Hara Conway. Flood in Florence, 1966: A Fifty-Year Retrospective: Proceedings of Symposium, November 3 and 4, 2016, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Richard L. Saunders. John Carter’s ABC for Book Collectors, 9th edition. Nicholas Barker and Simran Thadani, eds. and Sidney E. Berger. The Dictionary of the Book: A Glossary for Book Collectors, Booksellers, Librarians, and Others.

 

New Issue: Information & Culture

Volume 54 Number 2 (May 2019)
(subscription)

Articles

Making Messages Private: The Formation of Postal Privacy and Its Relevance for Digital Surveillance
Efrat Nechushtai

Archival Automation in the United Kingdom and the Relationship between Standardization and Computerization
Jenny Bunn

Information in an Industrial Culture: Walter A. Shewhart and the Evolution of the Control Chart, 1917–1954
Phillip G. Bradford and Paul J. Miranti

Innovation in Search of a Context: The Early History of Lexis
Xiaohua Zhu

Reviews

Making IT Work: A History of the Computer Services Industry by Jeffrey R. Yost (review)
Sarah A. Bell

Weaving the Dark Web: Legitimacy on Freenet, Tor, and I2P by Robert Gehl (review)
Elinor Carmi

Open Space: The Global Effort for Open Access to Environmental Satellite Data by Mariel Borowitz (review)
Robert D. Montoya

My Life as a Spy: Investigations in a Secret Police File by Katherine Verdery (review)
Kalpana Shankar

New Issue: Archives & Manuscripts

Volume 47, 2019
(subscription)

Editorial
Viviane Frings-Hessami

Articles

More human than human? Artificial intelligence in the archive
Gregory Rolan, Glen Humphries, Lisa Jeffrey, Evanthia Samaras, Tatiana Antsoupova & Katharine Stuart

Memory-making: a review of the Community Heritage Grant Program 1994–2018
Leisa Gibbons

Metadata as a machine for feeling in Germaine Greer’s archive
Millicent Weber & Rachel Buchanan

Digitised, digital and static archives and the struggles in the Middle East and North Africa
C. R. Pennell

An archive of humanity: the NSW Division of the Australian Red Cross, 1914–2014
Alison Wishart & Michael Carney

Diversity’s discontents: in search of an archive of the oppressed
Jarrett M. Drake

Reviews

Queering Archives: Historical Unravellings, Radical Histories Review Special Issue
Lachlan Glanville

The Big Archive: Art from Bureaucracy
Antonina Lewis

Agents of Empire: How E.L. Mitchell’s Photographs Shaped Australia
Catherine Robinson

Call for Submissions: Education Libraries

This call doesn’t specifically mention archives, but because it’s about education it is an opportunity to share teaching with primary sources or other topics of interest to educators.

__________________________________

The editors of Education Libraries are soliciting submissions for:

  • Articles
  • Case Studies
  • Book Reviews

Education Libraries is an Open Access, double-blind peer-reviewed journal that offers a forum for new and challenging ideas in education, and library and information science. It also explores the effect of new technologies on the library profession and library and information curriculum.

Education Libraries is published by the Education Division of the Special Libraries Association. Its audience consists of education information professionals employed in a variety of venues, including special libraries and information centers, academic libraries, public libraries, and school libraries.

Manuscripts submitted for publication in Education Libraries should present research studies, descriptive narratives, or other thoughtful considerations of topics of interest to the education information professional. Manuscripts focusing on issues relevant to more general concerns either in the field of education or in the field of library and information science are also welcome provided they include a significant component specifically germane to education, libraries, and librarianship.

Submission guidelines

Education Libraries is indexed in ERIC, EBSCOhost’s Education Collection, and Library Literature.

In addition, we are looking for volunteers interested in acting as peer-reviewers, or interesting in supporting the journal in other ways.

Please contact Editor-in chief, Willow Fuchs, at education.libraries@gmail.com if you have any questions.

Willow Fuchs
Editor-in-chief, Education Libraries
University of Iowa Libraries
willow-fuchs@uiowa.edu
319-353-0151

Call for Chapters: Implementing Excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: A Handbook for Academic Libraries

Call for Chapter Proposals
Implementing Excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: A Handbook for Academic Libraries

Chapter proposals are requested for an edited volume titled Implementing Excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: A Handbook for Academic Libraries, to be published by the Association of College and Research Libraries. Head Editors are Brian Lym (Hunter College) and Corliss Lee (University of California, Berkeley), and Co-Editors are Tatiana Bryant (Adelphi University), Jonathan Cain (University of Oregon), and Kenneth Schlesinger (Lehman College).

We are seeking case studies, qualitative research studies, quantitative research studies, survey research studies, and other research-based solutions that can be implemented in today’s libraries. A more detailed outline appears below.

Proposals, including a 600-800 word abstract, should be submitted by August 19, 2019. Notification of acceptance will occur by the end of September 2019. Selected authors should expect to submit a full draft of their article no later than January 14, 2020.

Call for Proposals:
https://tinyurl.com/yyefwazv

Send questions to Head Editors Brian Lym (blym@hunter.cuny.edu) and Corliss Lee (clee@library.berkeley.edu).

Book Outline

The well-documented lack of diversity in the academic library workforce remains problematic, especially given growing expectations that the overall academic workforce be more representative of the increasingly diverse student bodies at our colleges and universities. That the lack of diversity is especially notable among the professional ranks (librarians, library leadership, and administrators) is indicative of inequity of opportunities for people of color and “minoritized” ethnic groups.

Further, remediation of racial and ethnic diversity in the academic library workplace raises broader diversity issues, including individuals with identities outside the gender binary and other individuals who face discrimination due to their sexual orientation, disabilities, religious affiliation, military status, age, or other identities.

Emerging efforts to diversify the academic library workplace are pointedly raising issues of inclusion in libraries where demographic homogeneity has historically prevailed. With Implementing  excellence in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, we hope to capture emerging research and practice that
demonstrate ways academic libraries and librarians can work with and within their institutions to create a more equitable and representative workforce.

Part 1: Leveraging and Deploying Systemic and Bureaucratic/Structural Solutions
Since colleges and universities are hierarchical and complex systems with centralized and bureaucratic controls that can effect or impede transformative change, academic library leaders need to leverage and deploy formal structures and administrative resources to achieve DEI excellence.

Themes (Part 1):

  • Recruitment and Hiring
  • Retention and Advancement
  • Professional Development and Support
  • Assessment: Tracking DEI Progress

Part 2: Leveraging Collegial Networks, Politics, and Symbols:
Strengthening and Deepening Change for DEI Excellence; Acknowledging and deploying collegial networks, leveraging informal and formal political power, and symbolic resources to foster diversity, equity, and inclusion excellence in academic libraries.

Themes (Part 2):

  • Navigating Collegial Networks and Normative Expectations
  • Leveraging the Politics of Organizational Behavior (formal and informal power)
  • Reinforcing the Message: Deploying Change Through Deployment of Symbolic Activities