New/Recent Publications: Various

ARL White Paper on Wikidata: Opportunities and Recommendations
Association of Research Libraries, 2019

Scholarship in the Sandbox: Academic Libraries as Laboratories, Forums, and Archives for Student Work
edited by Amy S. Jackson, Cindy Pierard, and Suzanne M. Schadl
Association for College and Research Libraries, 2019

Research Library Issues, RLI 297: The Current Privacy Landscape
2019

Triple Storage for Random Access: Versioned Querying of RDF Archives
Ruben Taelman, Miel Vander Sande, Joachim Van Herwegen, Erik Mannens and Ruben Verborgh

Digital Heritage. Progress in Cultural Heritage: Documentation, Preservation, and Protection, 7th International Conference, EuroMed 2018, Nicosia, Cyprus, October 29 – November 3, 2018, Proceedings, Part II
Editors: Marinos Ioannides, Eleanor Fink, Raffaella Brumana, Petros Patias, Anastasios Doulamis, João Martins, Manolis Wallace
(Springer International Publishing, 2018)

Always Already Computational: Collections
Thomas Padilla, PI, Laurie Allen, Co-PI, Hannah Frost, Co-I, Sarah Potvin, Co-I, Elizabeth Russey Roke, Co-I, Stewart Varner, Co-I

 

Call for Reviewers

Are you interested in writing a review for the American Archivist Reviews Portal? Reviewers assess digital collections, exhibits, tools, platforms, services, and other resources that archivists use. New professionals and students welcome! View guidelines for writing reviews and contact the Reviews Portal Coordinator, Gloria Gonzalez (gloria@zepheira.com), with any questions.​

New Issue: Manuscript Studies: A Journal of the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies

Spring 2019 Vol. 4.1

Articles

In the Age of Non-Mechanical Reproduction: Manuscript Variation in Early-Modern South Asia
Arthur Dudney and Neer aja Poddar

Manuscript Variations of Dabistān-i Maẕāhib and Writing Histories of Religion in Mughal India
Sudev Sheth

Power Permutations in Early Hindi Manuscripts: Who Asks the Questions and Who Gives the Answers, Rāmānand or Kabīr?
Heidi Pauwels

The Strange Afterlife of Vidyāpati Ṭhākura (ca. 1350–1450 CE): Anthological Manuscripts, Linguistic Confusion, and Religious Appropriation
Christopher L. Diamond

Prefatory Notes on Persian Idioms of Islamic Jurisprudence:Reasoning and Procedures of Law-Making in Premodern Islamicate India
Naveen Kanalu

Replication and Innovation in the Folk Narratives of Telangana:Scroll Paintings of the Padmasali Purana, 1625–2000
Anais Da Fonseca

Nectar or Arrow:Cases of Missense Textual Mutations in Early Kabīrian Padas
Zhang Minyu

“Publishing” and Publics in a World Without Print:Vernacular Manuscripts in Early Modern India
Tyler Williams

Reviews

Kay Davenport. The Bar Books: Manuscripts Illuminated for Renaud de Bar, Bishop of Metz (1303–1316). Manuscripta Illuminata 2. (review by Richard A. Leson)

Matti Peikola, Aleksi Mäkilähde, Hanna Salmi, Mari-Liisa Varila, and Janne Skaffari, eds. Verbal and Visual Communication in Early English Texts. Utrecht Studies in Medieval Literacy 37. (review by Lydia Yaitsky Kertz)

Alpo Honkapohja. Alchemy, Medicine, and Commercial Book Production: A Codicological and Linguistic Study of the Voigts-Sloane Manuscript Group. (review by Winston Black)

New Issue: Library Trends

I am deviating from posting archives-related content because I believe many of you will be interested in this special issue of Library Trends. While I have not (yet) read it, I hope it contains information that we can also use in our practices.

______________________________________

Volume 67, Number 3, Winter 2019
Disabled Adults in Libraries
Jessica Schomberg and Shanna Hollich, Issue Editors

Introduction
Jessica Schomberg, Shanna Hollich

Articles

The Impact of Disbelief: On Being a Library Employee with a Disability
JJ Pionke

Reproductive Failure and Information Work: An Autoethnography
Gina Schlesselman-Tarango

Disability, Identity, and Professionalism: Precarity in Librarianship
Christine M. Moeller

Claiming Our Space: A Quantitative and Qualitative Picture of Disabled Librarians
Robin Brown, Scott Sheidlower

Disability, the Silent D in Diversity
Teneka Williams, Asha Hagood

Evaluating the User Experience of Patrons with Disabilities at a Community College Library
Catherine Pontoriero, Gina Zippo-Mazur

Access Provision for Sight Impaired Students (SISs) in Nigerian University Libraries
Emmanuel Chukwudi Ihekwoaba, Roseline Ngozi Okwor, Austin Jude Chikaodi Mole, Caroline Uchenna Nnadi

Supporting Students with Histories of Trauma in Libraries: A Collaboration of Accessibility and Library Services
Sasha Conley, Aaron Ferguson, Alana Kumbier

Beyond Sensory Story Time: An Intersectional Analysis of Information Seeking Among Parents of Autistic Individuals
Amelia N. Gibson, Dana Hanson-Baldauf

Call for Chapters – Teaching with Archives & Special Collections Cookbook (ACRL Publications)

CALL FOR “RECIPES” (CHAPTER PROPOSALS)

The Teaching with Archives & Special Collections Cookbook is seeking recipes!

We are now accepting recipe proposals detailing lesson plans or projects that demonstrate the integration of archives and special collections material into the classroom. We are seeking practical guides that provide an entry point to teaching with primary sources for information professionals new to teaching and learning with archives and special collections, including archivists, special collections librarians, and instruction librarians. Additionally, we seek innovative proposals that will serve as a resource for those experienced with teaching with primary sources and archives by providing a repository of ideas for when their lesson plans need to be refreshed and updated.

Recipes will include the following:

Recipes will follow the ACRL Cookbook format. Your 600- to 800-word submission must describe a successful lesson plan or activity using archives and special collections material. Please also include:

  • Recipe name (a.k.a. your “chapter” title)
  • Your name, university or other affiliation
  • Your email address, if you would like it included with your recipe (optional)
  • Potential cookbook category, section, and part (see below)

Submission information and due dates:

Email your draft recipes to jmp48@psu.edu by July 16, 2019

Notifications will be sent out in August 2019

Final recipes will be due on October 5, 2019

Cookbook Outline:

  1. Meal Prep: Teaching Archival Literacy

Lessons that prepare students for the situated and unique aspects of doing research in archives and special collections libraries. 

  1. Good Orderer: Teaching Search & Discovery in Archives & Special Collections

Lessons that help students make use of archival search and discovery tools, such as finding aids. 

  1. Food Critics: Teaching Primary Source Literacy

 Lessons that support student analysis of primary sources. 

  1. Something from the Cart: Exhibitions as Teaching & Learning

Lessons that utilize the exhibition of primary sources as a teaching and learning tool. 

  1. Community Picnics: K-12 & Non-course-related Instruction

      Lessons for K-12 & community audiences. 

  1. Takeout: Teaching with Digital Collections

Lessons that utilize digital collections to teach primary sources literacy outside of archives and special collections libraries’ physical spaces. 

Email jmp48@psu.edu with any questions. Please refer to The Embedded Librarians Cookbook (ACRL 2014), The First Year Experience Library Cookbook (ACRL 2017), and The Library Assessment Cookbook (ACRL 2017) for examples of format and tone. We are willing to be flexible with length, wording, style, and topics.  Creativity encouraged! We look forward to your proposals!

Editor:

Julie M. Porterfield, Instruction & Outreach Archivist, Penn State University Libraries

Archives and Manuscripts Special Issue: Information Technologies and Indigenous Communities

The long-awaited Information Technologies and Indigenous Communities special issue of Archives and Manuscripts has been published online. ASA Members get free access to all A&M papers online via the Taylor and Francis webpage, make sure you log in via the member centre, to take full advantage of your membership.

This most recent issue was guest edited by Lyndon Ormond-Parker and Aaron Corn and contains revised versions of papers that were presented at the Information Technology and Indigenous Communities (ITIC) symposium that took place in tandem with the ASA Conference 2017.

Topics covered include audiovisual archives, the administration of Indigenous archives, connecting community to their archives, digital tools and approaches to representing Indigenous knowledge.

Eight peer-reviewed articles are complemented by two reflections that explore specific archives in depth. Two book reviews are included about recent books that have built significantly on research into archived Indigenous resources.

Lots of food for thought and practical examples of managing archives in a changing world.

Call for Chapters: Digital Heritage in Cultural Conflicts

The DigiCONFLICT international Research Consortium are seeking proposals for chapter contributions to an academic, peer-reviewed, edited volume on uses and abuses of digital heritage in the context of socially and politically charged cultural conflicts.

DigiCONFLICT is a Research Consortium funded by the Joint Programming Initiative on Cultural Heritage. Its founding research partners are based in the United Kingdom, Poland, and Sweden, each exploring the impact of digital heritage in nationally framed cultural conflicts. While acknowledging the role digitalization plays in shaping transnational attitudes to cultural heritage, members of the DigiCONFLICT Research Consortium contest common convictions about the allegedly universal and democratic nature of digital heritage. Also recognizing the role digital heritage plays in increasing access to cultural heritage and in making cultural heritage products readily available across borders, they pay particular attention to the ways in which digital heritage reflects and frames given societies as well as their complex historical and cultural power structures.

Investigating how different professional, ethnic, national, civil and other interest groups anywhere in the world employ digital heritage to advance their agendas, we are interested in receiving empirically as well as theoretically underpinned chapter proposals on subjects, themes, and case studies related, but not limited, to questions such as:

  • How does specifically national politics affect digital definitions and the scope of what counts as cultural heritage?
  • How do transitions of in/tangible forms of cultural heritage into digital formats and displays affect public engagement with them?
  • How is the scope and value of cultural heritage being negotiated in diverse culturally, socially and politically charged digital contexts?
  • How do individuals and/or interest groups use and engage with digital heritage to resist acts of social, political, or cultural oppression/repression.
  • How do individuals or interest groups engage with digital heritage to enhance, modify, or contest forms of intergenerational communication about history and past experiences.

Members of the DigiCONFLICT Research Consortium take specific interest in multimedia museums, oral history, and photography as the most common media employed in the creation and dissemination of digital heritage. Nevertheless, keen to expand as well as delve deeper into this range of interests, we equally welcome chapter proposals on these and any other media and practices.

The volume editors will be the Consortium’s founding partners: Gil Pasternak (DigiCONFLICT Project Leader and UK Team Principal Investigator), Ewa Manikowska (Polish Team Principal Investigator), and Malin Thor Tureby (Swedish Team Principal Investigator). It will be published with a well-recognized, academic publisher, and it is intended that the book/chapters will be Open Access.

While preparing your proposal, you may want to know that each chapter in the edited volume will ideally range between 7,500 and 8,000 words (including notes and references/bibliography).

In addition, the proposals should not exceed 500 words while clearly identifying the subject and main argument of the intended contribution, and indicating with as much specificity as possible what primary sources are going to inform the discussion (for example, interviews, archival research, participant observations, digital ethnography etc).

A list of up to 5 keywords and a short bibliography of relevance to your proposal may also be included in the submission (i.e. beyond the 500 words already allocated).

All chapter proposals must be written in English, and should be sent to DigiCONFLICT@gmail.com by the 7th of June 2019.

Thank you very much and we look forward to hearing from you.

DigiCONFLICT | Research Consortium

Gil Pasternak, Project Leader and UK Team Principal Investigator
Ewa Manikowska, Polish Team Principal Investigator
Malin Thor Tureby, Swedish Team Principal Investigator

Contact Info:
For any queries please contact Dr Gil Pasternak
Contact Email: gpasternak@dmu.ac.uk

CFP: Information Studies, Race and Racism (second call)

Guest Editors:
Melissa Villa-Nicholas
Latesha Velez

Description

As Safiya Noble asserts in her seminal work Algorithms of Oppression “The cultural practices of our society…are part of the ways in which race-neutral narratives have increased investments in Whiteness” (p. 59). There is a need to disrupt these race-neutral narratives in Information Studies research and there is a growing body of work that does just that by re-orienting Information Studies research to centralize discussions of race and racism. Many researchers also use critical theories to help analyze their findings or are offering counter-narratives highlighting minoritized actors (such as women and people of color). Re-centering Information Studies by contextualizing it within an analysis of how race and racism affects our field changes what we think we know, and our understandings about Information Studies. Only when these alternate narratives are integrated into the fabric of Information Studies research can Information Studies begin interrogating the long held beliefs in our field.

We are intentionally casting a wide net and invite authors from a broad range of professional and academic backgrounds to contribute to this special issue of Open Information Science journal. We are asking for submissions that centralize the theme of Information Studies, race and racism, in order to evolve the field into a more critical theoretical foundation that moves away from colorblind ideology and narratives of neutrality, which only serve to disguise the ubiquity of whiteness.

The scope of this issue might include, but is not limited to, research on:

  • Anti-racism methods in Information Studies
  • Critical Race Theory and Information Studies
  • Deconstructing ‘colorblindness’ in Information Studies and/or information institutions
  • Intersectional analysis of Information Studies (race and : gender, sexuality, class, disability and ableism, indigeneity,
  • Classifications, cataloging, and taxonomies
  • Analysis of whiteness and information organizations, information institutions, or applications of whiteness studies to Information Studies
  • How notions of race and racism affect our we conceptualize and teach information literacy
  • Contemporary or historical debates around race and/or racism in information institutions (Libraries, Archives, Museums, special collections, business, education, labor, Silicon Valley, Government, incarceration)
  • Big Data, race and racism
  • Race and racism as it relates to knowledge organization
  • Anti racism or applications of an analysis of racism of Information Studies in non-Western and/or non U.S. contexts
  • Information, surveillance, and racism

How to Submit

Authors are kindly invited to register at our paper processing system at: http://www.editorialmanager.com/opis/ and submit their contribution.

Every manuscript should be clearly marked as intended for this special issue. All papers will go through the Open Information Science’s high standards, quick, fair and comprehensive peer-review procedure. Instructions for authors are available here. In case of any questions, please contact Guest Editors or Managing Editor (katarzyna.grzegorek@degruyter.com).

As an author of Open Information Science you will benefit from:

  • transparent, comprehensive and fast peer review managed by our esteemed Guest Editor;
  • efficient route to fast-track publication and full advantage of De Gruyter e-technology;
  • no publication fees;
  • free language assistance for authors from non-English speaking regions.

The deadline is June, the 30th, 2019.

Contact Info:
In case of any questions, please contact Guest Editors or Managing Editor (katarzyna.grzegorek@degruyter.com).

Contact Email: Lukasz.Gworek@degruyter.com

URL: https://www.degruyter.com/page/1930

CFP: Journal of Archival Organization – special issue on “Archives and Artifacts”

Archivists manage artifacts in a variety of situations – plaques and memorabilia found in personal papers; models, material samples, and mockups in architectural and industrial design collections; academic and business archives with significant artifactual holdings; or even hybrid archives-museum collections. This special issue will feature articles and case studies relating to the arrangement and description of artifacts in archives. We hope to encourage wider sharing of information between archivists who manage artifacts, and to spur dialogue that will hopefully lead to professional best practices.

We invite papers on any aspect of the archival organization of artifacts. Contributions might cover the following themes:

  • Impacts on processing planning and workflows
  • Integrating processing of artifacts with processing of manuscript material
  • Costs associated with arranging, describing, and storing artifacts
  • Minimum, added-value, and optimal description for artifacts
  • Artifact description and arrangement practices to maximize use/discovery by curators, researchers, and other users
  • Archival management systems and tools used to manage data about artifacts in an archival setting
  • Commonalities between the archives and museum profession in arrangement and description

We are particularly interested in exploring approaches to managing data about artifacts. Questions include: If extant archival systems do not meet our management needs for artifacts, how can we address these system limitations? What tools have archivists adopted or developed to manage data about artifacts? What can archivists learn from museum professionals about managing data about artifacts?  Can item-level processing of artifacts be usefully (and practically) integrated into the container- or folder-level processing usually applied to manuscript material, and if so, how?

Submissions

Papers may be original research articles or case studies. Submissions will be peer reviewed by independent, anonymous expert referees. Please refer to the Journal of Archival Organization Instructions for Authors: www.tandfonline.com/action/…

The deadline for submissions is June 21, 2019.

Prospective authors are invited to contact the Guest Editors, Michele Combs and John Nemmers, in order to discuss submissions for this special issue which is scheduled for publication in December 2019:

Michele Combs
Lead Archivist, Special Collections Research Center
Syracuse University
mrrothen@syr.edu, 315-443-2081

John Nemmers
Associate Chair, Special & Area Studies Collections
University of Florida
jnemmers@ufl.edu, 352-273-2766

The Journal of Archival Organization is an international, peer-reviewed journal publishing high-quality, original research relating to all aspects of the arrangement, description, and provision of access to all forms of archival materials. For more information about the Journal of Archival Organization and examples of recent articles published in the journal: www.tandfonline.com/toc/wjao20

Call for Proposals: SAA’s Archival Futures Series

I heard about this new series at SAA last year. It is a great opportunity for anyone who wants to write something longer than an article but shorter than a typical book. Also, you can write about anything!

As a former member of SAA’s Publications Board, I highly encourage you to contact the editors with any questions you have. They want good proposals, and also want to help you create good proposals. So don’t be shy and reach out if you have ideas!

___________________________________

Archival Futures explores a wide range of society and technology-focused topics (see list below). Proposals should include the following:

  • the theme, purpose, and scope
  • the main argument or premise
  • the estimated length
  • the proposed format and an annotated outline or table of contents
  • the intended audience and the potential market (especially potential for an audience outside of the archives profession or affiliated professions)
  • the prospective value to the archives profession
  • the relationship of the proposed publication to the literature in the field
  • potential graphics and illustrations
  • co-authors or contributors
  • the author’s anticipated available time for writing the first draft and for editorial revisions (i.e., how long will this take you?)

EDITORIAL PROCESS

Timely development will be facilitated by the use of a collaborative yet rigorous editorial process. Each publication will be edited by a Series Editor with input from other reviewers. A single-blind review process will be used. Authors should expect a robust editorial presence, involving considerable back-and-forth from acceptance to completion, and high-quality copyediting and design work, to ensure the creation of an outstanding product.

WORKFLOW 

  • Series Editors receive and review proposal
  • Series Editors present proposal to SAA Publications Editor
  • Publications Editor and Series Editors send for peer review
  • Publications Editor gives final approval
  • One of the Series Editors is assigned to work on the project
  • ALA issues contract to Author
  • Author begins writing book

CONTACT

For more information about Archival Futures, or to present or discuss a proposal (see potential topics below), please contact Series Editors Bethany Anderson (bgandrsn@gmail.com) and Amy Cooper Cary (amy.cary@marquette.edu).

POTENTIAL TOPICS

Society Focused:

  • Anthropology
  • Anthropocentrism
  • Arts
  • Citizenship
  • Civic Engagement
  • Colonialism
  • Community
  • Critical Race Theory
  • Cultural Competency
  • Democracy
  • Diversity / Inclusion
  • Diversifying Collections
  • Economics
  • Equality
  • Ethics
  • Ethnicity / Ethnocentrism
  • Feminism
  • Freedom of Information
  • Gaps in the archival record
  • Gender Identity
  • Historiography
  • Humanism
  • Emigrants / Immigrants
  • Intersectionality
  • Journalism
  • Labor
  • Law Enforcement
  • Memory
  • Nationalism
  • Nostalgia
  • Permanence
  • Popular culture
  • Reconciliation
  • Refugees
  • Religion / Spirituality
  • Right to be Forgotten / Erasure
  • Science
  • Secret Archives
  • Social Justice
  • Stewardship
  • Storytelling

Technology Focused:

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Bio-archives
  • Civic Data
  • Computation
  • Big Data
  • Data Rescue
  • Email
  • Free Speech
  • Machine Learning
  • Privacy
  • Social Media
  • Webarchives