Society of Florida Archivists Journal Vol. 1 Issue 1 Now Available

The SFAJ Editorial Board is delighted to announce that Volume 1 Issue 1 of the Society of Florida Archivists Journal is now published online! You can find it under the Current Issue menu on the SFAJ website. Below is a list of the wonderful authors that contributed articles to this issue as well as the folks who provided some insightful book reviews. Congratulations to all for a job well done!

Articles:

Matthew Miguez
Robert Rubero
Sandra Varry
Rory Grennan
Krystal Thomas

Reviews:

Elliot Williams
David Benjamin

The editorial team learned a lot by putting this first issue together and now we’re ready to start creating the next one! A recent Call for Future Papers went out in the Fall 2018 Florida Archivist Newsletter so please consider submitting for a future issue.

If you have an essay, case study, reflective or opinion piece, tool or book review, or any other work-in-progress paper please reach out to the Journal at floridaarchivists.journal@gmail.com. We’d love to know what you’re working on as we consider content for our 2019 issue.

Call for Chapters: Changing Roles, Changing Times: Essays on Academic and Public Librarians’ Responsibilities in an Era of Change

Call for Book Chapters: Academic and Public Libraries

I am seeking chapter proposals for a new edited collection tentatively titled “Changing Roles, Changing Times: Essays on Academic and Public Librarians’ Responsibilities in an Era of Change”, to be published by McFarland & Company.

The monograph’s purpose is to examine the impact of technology on librarians’ position duties and responsibilities.  This evolution is leading to the creation of new positions and the restructuring of old positions in order to meet the increasing demands technology is placing on the profession.  The impact of technology is significantly revising the look of librarianship in the academic and public spheres.  Librarians from all levels are impacted from the newly-hired librarian to the seasoned, veteran manager.

This work seeks to capture the experiences, thoughts, and opinions of librarians whose new roles are transforming their working relationships with faculty and students and related communities. Librarians working in academic and public libraries have valuable experiences to share with the library community. The entire library community will benefit from reading and applying the experiences and knowledge shared by a group of library leaders.

Please submit a proposal of 250-500 words for consideration.

Topics may include, but not limited to:

Digital Services:

  • Big Data Analytics
  • Collaborations with constituents such as students and local communities
  • Data Curation and Preservation
  • Data Management (e.g. data management plans)
  • Data Science
  • Data Visualization
  • Digital Humanities
  • Discovery search services
  • Social Media
  • Virtual Reality

“Open” Activities:

  • Creative Commons Licensing
  • Institutional Repositories
  • Intellectual Property (patents, trademarks, copyright)
  • Open Access (e.g., monographs, journals, open educational resources)
  • Scholarly Communications

By February 8, 2019, please email your chapter proposals to:
Tom Diamond, editor
Louisiana State University
notted@lsu.edu<mailto:notted@lsu.edu>

Thanks,
Tom Diamond
Louisiana State University

Archives & Manuscripts Promotes Open Access

How to share your Archives and Manuscripts articles

The Archives and Manuscripts team are requesting that all contributors please consider posting the accepted manuscript* version of articles and reviews published from 2012 onwards on their preferred platform.

The accepted manuscript of anything published in Archives and Manuscripts from 2012 onwards can be shared on any platform. Including but not limited to: your personal website, your LinkedIn profile, your institution’s repository.

We only require that you add the following text to your manuscript:  “This is an [Accepted Manuscript / Original Manuscript] of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Archives and Manuscripts on [date of publication], available at http://wwww.tandfonline. com/[Article DOI].”

Adding this text will assist anyone who found your article or review to cite you correctly.

Refer to this infographic for further information about ways in which you can share your Archives and Manuscripts article.

If you have any questions or queries about this information, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with the A&M Journal Team.

*The accepted manuscript version of your article is “your paper after peer review, when it has been revised and accepted for publication by the journal editor”. Please note that it is not the final version of your article which has been copyedited and typeset.  Instructions to sharing your work

Information & Culture: New Book Reviews

Making IT Work: A History of the Computer Services Industry by Jeffrey R. Yost
Reviewed by Sarah A. Bell

The computer services industry has worldwide annual revenues of nearly a trillion dollars and employs millions of workers, but is often overshadowed by the hardware and software products industries. In this book, Jeffrey Yost shows how computer services, from consulting and programming to data analytics and cloud computing, have played a crucial role in shaping information technology—in making IT work… (MIT Press)

Weaving the Dark Web: Legitimacy on Freenet, Tor, and I2P, by Robert Gehl
Reviewed by Elinor Carmi

The term “Dark Web” conjures up drug markets, unregulated gun sales, stolen credit cards. But, as Robert Gehl points out in Weaving the Dark Web, for each of these illegitimate uses, there are other, legitimate ones: the New York Times‘s anonymous whistleblowing system, for example, and the use of encryption by political dissidents. Defining the Dark Web straightforwardly as websites that can be accessed only with special routing software, and noting the frequent use of “legitimate” and its variations by users, journalists, and law enforcement to describe Dark Web practices (judging them “legit” or “sh!t”), Gehl uses the concept of legitimacy as a window into the Dark Web. He does so by examining the history of three Dark Web systems: Freenet, Tor, and I2P… (MIT Press)

My Life as a Spy: Investigations in a Secret Police File by Katherine Verdery
Reviewed by Kalpana Shankar

As Katherine Verdery observes, “There’s nothing like reading your secret police file to make you wonder who you really are.” In 1973 Verdery began her doctoral fieldwork in the Transylvanian region of Romania, ruled at the time by communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. She returned several times over the next twenty-five years, during which time the secret police—the Securitate—compiled a massive surveillance file on her. Reading through its 2,781 pages, she learned that she was “actually” a spy, a CIA agent, a Hungarian agitator, and a friend of dissidents: in short, an enemy of Romania. (Duke University Press)

CFP: 2019 issue of Provenance

Provenance: The Journal of the Society of Georgia Archivists, a peer reviewed academic publication, seeks articles on archival theory and practice for the first issue of 2019. Please note that the content of the journal is not limited to the state of Georgia, and articles of regional or national significance are welcome. First-time authors are especially encouraged to submit articles for consideration. Provenance is also interested in innovative and unique methods for presenting scholarly content. Please contact Heather Oswald if you would like to discuss an article idea or format.

Articles on archival topics outside of theory and practice which meet publication standards will also be considered. Typical papers should be a Word document, 10-20 pages, double spaced, and formatted according to the 17th edition of the Chicago Manual of Style. Please review information for contributors: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/provenance/policies.html.

Articles are to be submitted utilizing Provenance’s new online system: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/provenance/.

For additional information contact Editor Heather Oswald at: provenance@soga.orgDeadline for contributions is April 15, 2019.

Gracy Award 

Each year the SGA awards the Gracy Award, a $350 prize which recognizes a superior contribution to Provenance. Named for David B. Gracy II, founder and first editor of Georgia Archive, the award began in 1990 and is judged by the editorial board.

*Back issues of Provenance and Georgia Archive available online.*

Best,

Heather Oswald
Manager of Public Services
Baker Library, Harvard Business School
Somerville MA

Call for Participants and Presentations: SAA 2019 Research Forum

Call for Participants and Presentations
Society of American Archivists
2019 Research Forum
Friday, August 2, 9:00 am–5:00 pm
JW Marriott, Austin, Texas

Archivists from around the country and the world will convene at ARCHIVES*RECORDS 2019, the Joint Annual Meeting of the Council of State Archivists and Society of American Archivists, in Austin, Texas, July 31- August 6, 2019. If you’re engaged in research…seeking to identify research-based solutions for your institution…willing to participate in the research cycle by serving as a beta site for research trials…or simply interested in what’s happening in research and innovation…then join us in Austin, Texas, for the 13th annual SAA Research Forum: “Transformative!”

Researchers, practitioners, educators, students, and the curious across all sectors of archives and records management are invited to participate. Use the Forum to discuss, debate, plan, organize, evaluate, or motivate research projects and initiatives. Here’s your chance to find collaborators or to help inform researchers about what questions and problems need to be tackled. The Forum features the full spectrum of research activities—from “pure” research to applied research to innovative practice—all of interest and value to the archives community.

The organizers encourage submissions for the Research Forum that address 1) diversity and inclusion and/or 2) models for collaboration across domains (archives, libraries, galleries, and museums).

For ideas or to learn more about past Forums, see the 2007-2018 proceedings at http://archivists.org/proceedings/research-forum.

Questions? Contact the organizers at researchforum@archivists.org – and watch for updates on the Forum’s webpage at http://archivists.org/proceedings/research-forum.

The 2019 Research Forum will feature a full day of presentations. The following events are planned:

● Research Presentations and Posters (Friday, August 2, 9:00 am–5:00 pm): Here’s your chance to present, discuss, listen to, or view research reports and results on a variety of topics. The final 30 minutes of this session will seek input for SAA’s 2020 Research Forum.

● Poster Sessions: Be sure to make time to visit the poster sessions, which will include practice innovation and research topics.

Call for Platform and Poster Presentations

SAA invites submission of abstracts (of 250 words or fewer) for either 10-minute platform presentations or poster presentations. Topics may address research on, or innovations in, any aspect of archives practice or records management in government, corporate, academic, scientific, or other setting. Presentations on research results that may have emerged since the 2018 Joint Annual Meeting Call for Proposals deadline are welcome, as are reports on research completed within the past three years that you think is relevant and valuable for discussion. Please indicate whether you intend a platform or poster presentation.

Abstracts will be evaluated by a review committee co-chaired by Nance McGovern (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and Heather Soyka (Kent State University).
Abstract Submission Form

Deadline for submission of abstracts: May 15, 2019. You will be notified of the review committee’s decision by July 2 (in advance of the Early-Bird registration deadline).

Please be sure to include:  Presentation title, your name and affiliation, email address, and whether your proposal is for a platform or poster presentation.

Recent Issue: The Moving Image

The Moving Image, Vol. 18 no. 1 Spring 2018

Editors’ Foreword
Donald Crafton and Susan Ohmer

Features

Where “Post-Race” Happens: National Basketball Association Branding and the Recontextualization of Archival Sports Footage
Timothy J. Piper

The Hidden History of the American Film Institute: The Cold War, Arts Policy, and American Film Preservation
Brian Real

“Why I am Ashamed of the Movies”: Editorial Policy, Early Hollywood, and the Case of Camera!
Peter Lester

Forum

Under Threat: One Archive’s Tale from the 2017 Napa and Sonoma County Fires
James Mockoski and Courtney Garcia

RKO’s Studio Archive: The Golden Years
Anthony Slide, Richard Jewell and Robert Carringer

Building a Crowdsourcing Platform for the Analysis of Film Colors
Barbara Flueckiger and Gaudenz Halter

Teaching (Like) Hannah Frank (1984–2017): A Tribute
Mihaela Mihailova, Jen Bircher, Robert Bird, Mariana Johnson, Ian Bryce Jones, Ryan Pierson, Alla Gadassik and Tim Palmer

A Deal with the Devil: Bill Morrison on Dawson City: Frozen Time
Donald Crafton and Bill Morrison

Review

Treasures from the Library of Congress
Review by: Richard Lewis Ward

New Issue: International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives Journal

Issue 49 of the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives (IASA) Journal

2019 Conference Reminder

IASA Journal Editorial Board

Editorial

President’s Letter

Tribute: Claes Cnattingius

Announcement: First edition of IASA-TC 06 online

Profiles
Musings on the Importance of Harnessing the Power of the Internet to Improve Access to Soundtracks
Sami Meddeb, Tunisia
Louis Fortin, Les Productions Mission Vision, Canada

On the Bright Side of Data Migrations
Reto Kromer, AV Preservation by reto.ch, Switzerland

Articles
Joining Forces in Audiovisual Digitisation, Digital Preservation and Access: The Indian and the Flemish Approach
Irfan Zuberi (NCAA) and Brecht Declercq (VIAA)

Sound Practice: Exploring DACS Compliance in Archival Description of Music Recordings
Elizabeth Surles, Archivist, Institute of Jazz Studies, Rutgers University, USA

Moving Image User-Generated Description: A Matter of Time
Edward A. Benoit, School of Library & Information Studies, Louisiana State University, USA

Call for Nominations: 2018 SAA Waldo Gifford Leland Award

Have you read a great new book about archives? Encountered a new documentary publication that is head and shoulders above the rest? Has a new web publication really stood out to you?

If you have, please consider nominating it for the Society of American Archivists Waldo Gifford Leland Award. Nomination forms, a list of previous winners, and more information are at http://www2.archivists.org/governance/handbook/section12-leland. The deadline for nominations is February 28, 2019.

The annual Leland Award – a cash prize and certificate – recognizes “writing of superior excellence and usefulness in the field of archival history, theory, and practice.”

(Please note that periodicals are not eligible.)

Established in 1959, this award honors American archival pioneer Waldo Gifford Leland (1879-1966), president of the Society of American Archivists in the 1940s and one of the driving forces behind the founding of the National Archives.

Call for Book Chapters: Academic and Public Libraries

I am seeking chapter proposals for a new edited collection tentatively titled “Changing Roles, Changing Times: Essays on Academic and Public Librarians’ Responsibilities in an Era of Change”, to be published by McFarland & Company.

The monograph’s purpose is to examine the impact of technology on librarians’ position duties and responsibilities.  This evolution is leading to the creation of new positions and the restructuring of old positions in order to meet the increasing demands technology is placing on the profession.  The impact of technology is significantly revising the look of librarianship in the academic and public spheres.  Librarians from all levels are impacted from the newly-hired librarian to the seasoned, veteran manager.

This work seeks to capture the experiences, thoughts, and opinions of librarians whose new roles are transforming their working relationships with faculty and students and related communities. Librarians working in academic and public libraries have valuable experiences to share with the library community. The entire library community will benefit from reading and applying the experiences and knowledge shared by a group of library leaders.

Please submit a proposal of 250-500 words for consideration.

Topics may include, but not limited to:

Digital Services:

Big Data Analytics
Collaborations with constituents such as students and local communities
Data Curation and Preservation
Data Management (e.g. data management plans)
Data Science
Data Visualization
Digital Humanities
Discovery search services
Social Media
Virtual Reality

“Open” Activities:

Creative Commons Licensing
Institutional Repositories
Intellectual Property (patents, trademarks, copyright)
Open Access (e.g., monographs, journals, open educational resources)
Scholarly Communications

By February 8, 2019, please email your chapter proposals to:

Tom Diamond, editor
Louisiana State University
notted@lsu.edu

Thanks,
Tom Diamond
Louisiana State University